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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By David Horsey
The hymn-like tune “Alone Yet Not Alone” has been dumped from the list of five Oscar-nominated songs, and the resulting controversy has developed into a movie-worthy scenario complete with private investigators, a David-versus-Goliath confrontation and all the plot complexities of a who-done-it. Trouble began when the pretty little song with reverent lyrics popped up as a big surprise among the nominees. The movie that bears the same name as the song is a low-budget Christian film that earned a miniscule $134,000 in its initial three-week run. Some of those passed over for the best song Oscar were suspicious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Glenn Whipp
First the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences disqualified a song. Now it could be facing the music. For the first time in its history, the academy this week revoked an Oscar nomination on ethical grounds, citing improper campaigning by the composer of "Alone Yet Not Alone," which would have been one of the five contenders for original song at this year's Oscars. But the action has prompted criticism that the academy has cracked down on a small movie that can't compete with big-budget Oscar campaigns mounted by studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1992
Selling an Oscar smacks of commercialism, protests Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President Karl Malden ("Harold Russell Selling 'Best Years of Our Lives' Oscar,' " July 31). The movie industry has bronzed commercialism and Malden. Why didn't Malden quietly buy the Oscar and return it to the academy? JIM SKEESE San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Unlike last year, people hoping to jazz up their Academy Awards viewing parties this weekend with an oversized statuette resembling Oscar are now out of luck. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has settled a lawsuit it brought against an Edwardsville, Ill.-based events rental company for copyright infringement stemming from the alleged renting and selling of eight-foot statues that looked like the Oscar statuettes. The case against TheEventLine.com and its president, Robert Hollingsworth, was settled late last year and dismissed Nov. 19. In a lawsuit filed March 9 in U.S. District Court in Atlanta, the Academy had alleged that Hollingsworth continued to market, sell and rent the eight-foot statues after he'd been notified of the alleged infringement in a letter sent in March 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1989
I do not understand why the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences believes that it owns any awarded Oscar; do bowling leagues own the trophies they present to noteworthy keglers? If, as academy President Richard Kahn said, the awards "are given" for individual achievement, the recipients should be able to keep, give away, lend, sell, bequeath or discard said awards. MARTHA ABELL Seal Beach
BUSINESS
April 2, 2006
Regarding "Now Showing: Declining Sales at Theater Snack Bars," March 18: Instead of telling the public how wonderful it is to see a movie on the big screen (as it did during the Oscar telecast), the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences should shout to the theater owners to lower their prices. Sharon Beirdneau Mission Viejo
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Elena Howe
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Friday afternoon that it will split costume designers out of the broader designers branch and into their own branch.The academy's Board of Governors also noted that two new governors will soon join Jeffrey Kurland, who will transfer to newly created branch. "History was made at the Board of Governors meeting on Wednesday night with the formation of a Costume Designers Branch," said Kurland in a release. "Costume designers have waited a long time for recognition with branch status.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2005
THE decision of the Tony Award authorities to recognize the contribution of replacement stars to the success of Broadway shows [Quick Takes, Sept. 24] contrasts with the refusal of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to create an Oscar category for casting directors and stunt coordinators -- two areas that make an enormous and obvious contribution to the magic of the movies that directors and producers now claim, by default, as the result of their vision and talent. GODFREY HARRIS Los Angeles
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