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Motorcycle Gang

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | GAIL DAVIS and MATT SURMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The arrests of nine Hells Angels and 15 associates on drug charges over the weekend has some local officials and merchants hoping that the case helps the city shed its image as a magnet for the notorious motorcycle gang. "I can't say we've been particularly enamored with the fact that Ventura has been considered a haven for Hells Angels," said Mayor Sandy Smith, adding that City Hall often fields complaints about the bikers. Hells Angels leader George Gus Christie Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2011 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge has rejected a bid by prosecutors to seize the Mongols motorcycle gang's name and trademarked logo of a ponytailed man riding a chopper, according to a ruling made public Thursday. Prosecutors sought to strip the notorious gang of its name and logo as part of a sweeping criminal indictment three years ago that accused 79 Mongols members from six states of murder, assault, drug trafficking and robbery. Prosecutors asked the judge to bar Mongol members from using, distributing or wearing the name and logo, arguing that they were very closely associated with the gang and that removing them would prevent the Mongols from operating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He said his name was Billy, Billy St. John, and he dealt meth, and handled machine guns and teetered in dark, violent bars, pulling at bottled beer and winning the trust of men he would later betray in the name of the law. He said he wanted to join the Mongols, an East L.A. motorcycle gang that was desperate for new members. With a Willie Nelson beard and a face mapped with wrinkles, Billy looked the part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities arrested eight members of the Orange County-based Hessians motorcycle club on drug and weapons charges in a pre-dawn raid Friday that spanned five cities in three counties. Agents said they targeted the group for investigation about a year ago and hope the arrests send a signal to motorcycle gangs across the country. "We can't ignore them," said Agent Chris Sadowski of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
NEWS
February 22, 1985
Federal agents staging raids in nine states arrested 81 members of the Bandidos motorcycle gang on warrants charging them with narcotics, weapons and racketeering offenses. The gang is believed to control a major part of the U.S. methamphetamine--or "speed"--and PCP drug trade, the FBI said. FBI Director William H.
NEWS
February 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Federal agents swept down on the Bandidos outlaw motorcycle gang in eight states today, armed with warrants charging 90 members and associates with narcotics, weapons and racketeering offenses, the FBI said. The warrants charged members of the Bandidos, described as one of the four largest outlaw motorcycle gangs in the nation, with illegal manufacture and distribution of methamphetamines, known commonly as "speed" and "crank."
NATIONAL
November 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Thirty-six Hells Angels members pleaded not guilty in Las Vegas to federal racketeering, violence and weapons charges stemming from a deadly 2002 brawl with another motorcycle gang that left three people dead and dozens hurt. "They're not a criminal organization," said David Chesnoff, a Las Vegas lawyer and unofficial spokesman for Hells Angels from five Western states who are charged in the fracas with rival Mongols at an annual rally in Laughlin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
George Christie Jr., the Hells Angels leader who gained national attention when he carried the Olympic torch along the California coast, was acquitted by a federal court jury Tuesday of soliciting the murder of a government informant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2008 | Tony Perry
A 54-year-old man was sentenced Monday to six months' house arrest and a year of mental health counseling and substance-abuse testing after pleading guilty to threatening an advocate for seals at the Children's Pool in La Jolla. Kent Douglas Trego had already served nearly five months in jail since his arrest. He admitted that he used the Internet to send messages threatening violence toward a volunteer from the Animal Protection and Rescue League who was videotaping two divers allegedly harassing seals in violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act. In e-mails sent in December and January, Trego said that a motorcycle gang would take revenge on the witness "very harshly."
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