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NEWS
May 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Up to seven people are missing, presumed dead, on the northern face of Mount Everest, a spokeswoman for a New Zealand expedition on the world's highest peak said. The climbers, who are believed to have perished in a storm, included three Kazakhs, one German, a Nepali sherpa and an unidentified climber, Sue Kelly of Adventure Consultants said.
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SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A warming climate is melting the glaciers of Mount Everest, shrinking the frozen cloak of Earth's highest peak by 13% in the last 50 years, researchers have found. Rocks and natural debris previously covered by snow are appearing now as the snow line has retreated 590 feet, according to Sudeep Thakuri, a University of Milan scientist who led the research. The pessimistic view of Earth's tallest peak was presented during a meeting Tuesday of the American Geophysical Union in Cancun, Mexico.
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NATIONAL
November 28, 2010 | By David Kelly
The kitchen was hopping, orders flying in from every direction, and Jangbu Sherpa was smack in the middle, deep-frying samosas while eyeballing a simmering yak stew. Waiters rushed in ? more momos, more thupka, more papadums! Sherpa stayed cool, never breaking a sweat. And why would he? He's reached the summit of Mount Everest 10 times, seen men swept off high peaks, and survived an avalanche on K-2, the world's most dangerous mountain. "When I stood on Everest," he said, glancing up from a pot of boiling oil, "I felt like I was standing on top of the sky. " These days he stands over a hot oven at Sherpa's Adventurers Restaurant & Bar in downtown Boulder, serving up Nepali and Tibetan fare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Sir Edmund Hillary's historic ascent of Mt. Everest, everyone knew Hillary's name. Far fewer knew about his indispensable partner, George Lowe. Hillary and his friend Lowe were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 expedition to the top of the world's highest peak. If they could have had their way, they would have trekked to the summit together, but a number of circumstances, including the politics of giving two non-Brits on a British-led team the prime roles, conspired to leave Lowe among the unsung.
NEWS
November 30, 1986 | SUE GILLER, Computer Programmer
In 1924, British mountaineers George Mallory and Andrew Irvine disappeared after being spotted just 900 feet below the summit of Mount Everest. For more than 60 years, climbers have argued about whether the two men reached the top before perishing.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A warming climate is melting the glaciers of Mount Everest, shrinking the frozen cloak of Earth's highest peak by 13% in the last 50 years, researchers have found. Rocks and natural debris previously covered by snow are appearing now as the snow line has retreated 590 feet, according to Sudeep Thakuri, a University of Milan scientist who led the research. The pessimistic view of Earth's tallest peak was presented during a meeting Tuesday of the American Geophysical Union in Cancun, Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Sir Edmund Hillary's historic ascent of Mt. Everest, everyone knew Hillary's name. Far fewer knew about his indispensable partner, George Lowe. Hillary and his friend Lowe were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 expedition to the top of the world's highest peak. If they could have had their way, they would have trekked to the summit together, but a number of circumstances, including the politics of giving two non-Brits on a British-led team the prime roles, conspired to leave Lowe among the unsung.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A handkerchief of burgundy and blue, wrinkled and stained, monogrammed with the initials GLM. A pair of goggles, their green-tinted lenses scratched, the silver frame bent on one side. The rope that probably killed him when it broke, frayed horribly at one end. These are the things that came down from Mt. Everest when George Mallory did not. Spread out on a table at Washington's State Museum of History in their first U.S.
SPORTS
August 13, 1999 | PETE THOMAS
Alex Lowe sounds pretty good for a man who literally has been living on the edge for the past several weeks. The renowned climber, reached the other day by phone at his home in Bozeman, Mont., is relaxing after a grueling expedition in Pakistan, which he describes as being "sort of like a giant Utah" in that it's not easy to find a cold beer in a country run by Muslims. "You can get one," he says half-jokingly, "but you have to sign a waiver and basically prove that you're a sinful infidel.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | THOMAS CAHILL, Cahill was for 12 years publisher/editor of the Cahill & Co. Reader's Catalogue. He has recently begun a new book review and catalogue called "The Bookperson." and Marshall McLuhan
The words Marshall McLuhan remain, 10 years after the Toronto theoretician's death, fighting words. His name seems to provoke but two reactions: aggressive contempt from leftish intellectuals and impish smiles from more practical communicators, such as artists, composers, and advertising and TV people. Still, when one presses past initial prejudice, virtually everybody admits to not having finished any of his books, only two of which ever sold in anything like influential quantities--the numbingly incomprehensible "Gutenberg Galaxy" and "The Medium Is the Message," a 160-page picture book that was "co-ordinated" by Jerome Agel in the same charmingly accessible style he used for "co-ordinating" "I Seem to Be a Verb," which popularized the theories of another thunder-thinker of the '60s, Buckminster Fuller.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2010 | By David Kelly
The kitchen was hopping, orders flying in from every direction, and Jangbu Sherpa was smack in the middle, deep-frying samosas while eyeballing a simmering yak stew. Waiters rushed in ? more momos, more thupka, more papadums! Sherpa stayed cool, never breaking a sweat. And why would he? He's reached the summit of Mount Everest 10 times, seen men swept off high peaks, and survived an avalanche on K-2, the world's most dangerous mountain. "When I stood on Everest," he said, glancing up from a pot of boiling oil, "I felt like I was standing on top of the sky. " These days he stands over a hot oven at Sherpa's Adventurers Restaurant & Bar in downtown Boulder, serving up Nepali and Tibetan fare.
WORLD
October 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A cancer awareness group claimed to have staged the world's highest musical concert -- on Mt. Everest. The U.S.-based Love Hope Strength Foundation says on its website that the "Everest Rocks" concert was held at 18,540 feet. Six musicians from the U.S. and Britain performed at the concert: Mike Peters of the Alarm, Slim Jim Phantom of the Stray Cats, Cy Curnin and Jamie West-Oram of the Fixx, Glen Tilbrook of the Squeeze and Nick Harper. The money raised will go to a Nepalese cancer hospital.
WORLD
May 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A New Zealand mountaineer criticized for failing to rescue a dying British climber on Mt. Everest said there was nothing he could have done to save the man. Mark Inglis, a double amputee, was answering criticism by Everest pioneer Sir Edmund Hillary. David Sharp, 34, died just below the summit, apparently from oxygen deprivation suffered during his solo descent. More than 40 climbers are thought to have seen Sharp as he lay dying.
WORLD
May 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A New Zealand climber who had lost part of both legs to frostbite became the first double amputee to conquer Mt. Everest, despite breaking one of his artificial limbs during the ascent. Mark Inglis, 47, called his wife, Anne, in New Zealand to tell her he was on the 29,035-foot summit of the world's highest mountain. Inglis repaired the broken artificial leg about 21,000 feet up.
WORLD
May 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two South Korean climbers who were missing on Mt. Everest have been found dead, a university spokesman said. A colleague had been found dead earlier. The trio were part of a seven-member expedition from South Korea's Keymyung University.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | Rebecca Huntington
The setup: Stephen Koch of Jackson, Wyo., wants to climb up and snowboard down the highest peaks on all seven continents, and has bagged six. Photographer Jimmy Chin, also of Jackson, is along to document his attempt, aided by Lakpa Dorje Sherpa and Kami Sherpa, to snowboard the Hornbein Couloir on the north face of Mt. Everest. It's Aug. 29, 2003.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Stacy Marie Allison, a building contractor from Portland, Ore., became the first American woman to scale Mt. Everest, Nepal's Ministry of Tourism said Friday. The ministry, which authorizes Himalayan expeditions, said Allison, 30, reached the 29,028-foot summit at 10:38 a.m. Thursday, having followed the southeast ridge, the standard route to the top. Allison, who began her climb Aug. 22, was accompanied by Sherpa guide Pasang Gyalzen, 26, the announcement said.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson reached the summit of Mt. Everest early Friday, achieving a longtime goal. Johnson's wife, Dee, got a call from an official with the expedition shortly after 8 p.m. Thursday saying the team reached the summit at 7:45 p.m. That was 7:45 a.m. in Nepal. "It's a beautiful day," Dee Johnson said she was told by the expedition member who called. "They're the only ones up there." Johnson, 50, has also climbed Mt.
WORLD
May 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
It got crowded in the so-called Death Zone on Mt. Everest on Thursday, as a record 54 people stood atop the world's highest peak--including a grandson of one of the first two men to conquer it in 1953. The son of the other was headed for the summit on a slower route. Basking in rare, fine weather was Tashi Wangchuk Tenzing, whose Sherpa grandfather, Tenzing Norgay, made history when he and New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary made it to the summit 49 years ago.
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