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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Investigators Thursday identified the charred remains of an American researcher and two French volcano experts recovered from a Japanese mountain that erupted in an avalanche of hot rocks and ash. Troops recovered one additional body Thursday, bringing to 27 the number found since 4,452-foot Mt. Unzen erupted Monday. Another six people have died in hospitals of burns. At least five people are missing.
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NEWS
June 24, 1993 | Associated Press
Hot rocks, gas and ash roared down the slopes of the Mt. Unzen volcano Wednesday, killing at least one person and engulfing dozens of homes in flames and debris. The area was mostly deserted after 6,275 people were evacuated Tuesday when heavy rain touched off mudslides on Unzen, about 610 miles southwest of Tokyo. In June, 1991, an eruption on Unzen killed 43 people.
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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A volcano belched searing gases, ash and hot rocks onto a small community in southwestern Japan on Monday, killing as many as 12 people and setting dozens of homes ablaze. About three dozen people were unaccounted for, including 16 journalists as well as policemen, firefighters and researchers who had been monitoring the volcanic flow. Among the missing researchers was Harry Glicken, 33, formerly of UC Santa Barbara, who narrowly escaped death in the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mt. St.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 1,200 people were evacuated from their homes as torrential rains brought flooding that swept down debris from eruptions by a volcano that killed 41 people last month, firefighters said. Volcanic ash and basketball-sized rocks washed down three rivers leading from 4,485-foot Mt. but no casualties were reported, said Ichiro Otsu of the fire department in Shimabara, at the base of the volcano.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | Associated Press
Volcanoes, earthquakes and other natural disasters struck at week's end in Asia, South America, the Soviet Union and an island chain in the South Atlantic. Here is a rundown on the burst of activity: PHILIPPINES--A huge fissure cracked Mt. Pinatubo and scientists said the erupting volcano may be building up to a catastrophic blast. The region was also hit by winds and rains generated by a typhoon, and earthquakes triggered by the volcanic eruptions shook parts of Luzon Island.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops failed to retrieve the last bodies from the dangerous slopes of a volcano whose avalanche of burning rock and ash is believed to have killed at least 38 people. Officials said it was not known if the bodies of three missing foreigners--U.S. researcher Harry Glicken, 33, and a French couple--were among those retrieved after Monday's eruption of 4,445-foot Mt. Unzen in southern Japan.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two major volcanic eruptions in the Western Pacific in recent days have claimed only a few lives, reassuring scientists who have been desperately trying to improve their chances of predicting which volcanoes are about to blow their lids. Although it is still impossible to predict down to the minute when any volcano is going to erupt, scientists are now able to issue credible warnings days ahead of most eruptions, thus allowing thousands to flee to safety.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | Associated Press
Mt. Unzen spewed superheated rock, gas and ash Wednesday, and a nearby volcano also erupted, prompting officials to warn residents accustomed to that mountain's constant rumblings. Wednesday's flow from Unzen, which sent volcanic debris 2 1/2 miles down the mountainside and a huge gray cloud billowing into the sky, broke a lull in activity of several days. There were no reports of new injuries or damage.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | Associated Press
Hot rocks, gas and ash roared down the slopes of the Mt. Unzen volcano Wednesday, killing at least one person and engulfing dozens of homes in flames and debris. The area was mostly deserted after 6,275 people were evacuated Tuesday when heavy rain touched off mudslides on Unzen, about 610 miles southwest of Tokyo. In June, 1991, an eruption on Unzen killed 43 people.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soldiers raced for their lives as Mt. Unzen in southern Japan billowed showers of lava, searing stones and deadly gas for the second day Tuesday, a day after a major eruption killed at least 33 people. "We had just recovered four bodies when Unzen began spewing again," said a spokesman for the Japanese Self-Defense Forces unit spearheading rescue work at the site of the volcano disaster.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | Associated Press
Mt. Unzen spewed superheated rock, gas and ash Wednesday, and a nearby volcano also erupted, prompting officials to warn residents accustomed to that mountain's constant rumblings. Wednesday's flow from Unzen, which sent volcanic debris 2 1/2 miles down the mountainside and a huge gray cloud billowing into the sky, broke a lull in activity of several days. There were no reports of new injuries or damage.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | Associated Press
Volcanoes, earthquakes and other natural disasters struck at week's end in Asia, South America, the Soviet Union and an island chain in the South Atlantic. Here is a rundown on the burst of activity: PHILIPPINES--A huge fissure cracked Mt. Pinatubo and scientists said the erupting volcano may be building up to a catastrophic blast. The region was also hit by winds and rains generated by a typhoon, and earthquakes triggered by the volcanic eruptions shook parts of Luzon Island.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two major volcanic eruptions in the Western Pacific in recent days have claimed only a few lives, reassuring scientists who have been desperately trying to improve their chances of predicting which volcanoes are about to blow their lids. Although it is still impossible to predict down to the minute when any volcano is going to erupt, scientists are now able to issue credible warnings days ahead of most eruptions, thus allowing thousands to flee to safety.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Investigators Thursday identified the charred remains of an American researcher and two French volcano experts recovered from a Japanese mountain that erupted in an avalanche of hot rocks and ash. Troops recovered one additional body Thursday, bringing to 27 the number found since 4,452-foot Mt. Unzen erupted Monday. Another six people have died in hospitals of burns. At least five people are missing.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops failed to retrieve the last bodies from the dangerous slopes of a volcano whose avalanche of burning rock and ash is believed to have killed at least 38 people. Officials said it was not known if the bodies of three missing foreigners--U.S. researcher Harry Glicken, 33, and a French couple--were among those retrieved after Monday's eruption of 4,445-foot Mt. Unzen in southern Japan.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Soldiers raced for their lives as Mt. Unzen in southern Japan billowed showers of lava, searing stones and deadly gas for the second day Tuesday, a day after a major eruption killed at least 33 people. "We had just recovered four bodies when Unzen began spewing again," said a spokesman for the Japanese Self-Defense Forces unit spearheading rescue work at the site of the volcano disaster.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 1,200 people were evacuated from their homes as torrential rains brought flooding that swept down debris from eruptions by a volcano that killed 41 people last month, firefighters said. Volcanic ash and basketball-sized rocks washed down three rivers leading from 4,485-foot Mt. but no casualties were reported, said Ichiro Otsu of the fire department in Shimabara, at the base of the volcano.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A volcano belched searing gases, ash and hot rocks onto a small community in southwestern Japan on Monday, killing as many as 12 people and setting dozens of homes ablaze. About three dozen people were unaccounted for, including 16 journalists as well as policemen, firefighters and researchers who had been monitoring the volcanic flow. Among the missing researchers was Harry Glicken, 33, formerly of UC Santa Barbara, who narrowly escaped death in the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mt. St.
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