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Mountain Climbing

NATIONAL
December 21, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
With no sign of two missing climbers on Oregon's highest peak and a new storm bearing down on the mountain, the chief search official concluded "the chance of survival is pretty nil" and called off the search for the men Wednesday. "I don't think I can justify putting any more people in the field with the hope of finding them alive," Hood River County Sheriff Joe Wampler said.
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NATIONAL
December 20, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
One glorious day in June, Kelly James and Brian Hall, two longtime climbing partners from Dallas, were scaling Mt. Rainier, the tallest peak in the Cascades, when they met a man from Brooklyn, Jerry "Nikko" Cooke, who was in another group on its way up the mountain.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Two ice axes. Two slings. A single glove. A frayed piece of rope. As a helicopter team removed the body of a Texas man from Oregon's highest peak Monday, authorities said these items found on the mountain might indicate that his two climbing partners fell to their deaths in a crevasse while seeking help for the injured man.
WORLD
December 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Two prominent American climbers exploring a region of unclimbed 20,000-foot peaks in southwest China were last heard from in early November and failed to return to Denver as scheduled Dec. 4. Climbers in the United States said they, with U.S. and Chinese officials, had organized searches for the two: Christine Boskoff, one of the world's top female climbers, and Charlie Fowler, also a guide and photographer.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescue workers searching for three lost climbers on Mt. Hood were stymied by a blizzard. The National Weather Service said winds on the mountain reached 80 mph. One climber, Kelly James, is believed to be holed up in a snow cave near the top, and the other two are thought to have tried to descend for help. Forecasters said rescuers' next chance would probably be Saturday -- more than a week after the climbers ascended. Authorities said James' cellphone was on briefly as recently as Tuesday.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
Wind gusts of up to 70 mph and blinding snow kept search-and-rescue teams about 4,000 feet below the last known location of three missing hikers Wednesday near the summit of Oregon's Mt. Hood, officials said. "Man and machine are at their limits there," said Capt. Christopher Bernard with the Air Force Reserve's 304th Rescue Squadron. The hazardous conditions kept search teams at about 7,000 feet, Bernard said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Eric Newby, 86, author of the travel classic "A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush," died Oct. 20 near Guildford in southern England, his daughter Sonia Ashmore told the Associated Press. No cause of death was given. Born and raised in London, Newby gave up a job in advertising in 1938 to sail on a Finnish grain ship to Australia and back, a voyage he later recounted in "The Last Grain Race." Newby served with Britain's elite Special Boat Section during World War II.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2006 | From Associated Press
North America's tallest mountain is getting crowded -- too crowded for safety. Starting next year, the National Park Service will cap the number of climbers allowed on Alaska's Mt. McKinley at 1,500 a year -- not too many more than the record 1,340 alpinists who attempted to scale the 20,320-foot mountain last year. McKinley is required climbing for many of the world's most serious mountaineers who attempt to reach the summit of the highest peak on each of the seven continents.
WORLD
January 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Three Americans were killed when rocks tumbled down Mt. Kilimanjaro and smashed into climbers preparing to scale the peak of Africa's highest mountain, Tanzanian officials said. Three other Americans and two Tanzanians were injured in the slide Wednesday, said James Wakibara, chief warden at Mt. Kilimanjaro National Park. The dead were identified as Kristian Ferguson, 27, of Longmont, Colo.; Mary Lou Sammis, 58, of Huntington, N.Y.; and Betty Orrik Sapp, 63, of Melrose, Mass.
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