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Mourners

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
Friends and strangers came together this week to help the family of Leiana Ramirez, the 2-year-old who died last Friday in a fiery crash on the 110 Freeway near Highland Park. The little girl was riding southbound with her mother, Samika Ramirez, just north of York Boulevard, when an SUV plowed into their Nissan Altima, causing it to burst into flames. Neighbors, who have witnessed countless accidents along that curvy stretch of the roadway, raced to the scene and tried to help Ramirez rescue her daughter with buckets of water, garden hoses and fire extinguishers.
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WORLD
July 26, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Florists in Norway's capital could scarcely keep pace with the demand Monday as throngs of mourners poured into the streets for a nationwide moment of silence and, later in the day, a massive vigil that drew tens of thousands of people. Long lines snaked past many florist storefronts as Norwegians waited to buy flowers for an expanding memorial site in central Oslo, where a carpet of bouquets, candles, flags and children's drawings has taken over a square outside the Oslo Domkirke cathedral, just blocks from the site of Friday's deadly bomb blast.
WORLD
July 25, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Norwegians have always taken pride in their open, trusting society. It's a country where you might encounter the prime minister at the grocery store and offer a hug. Many police don't carry guns and most government buildings are unprotected. Homicide is rare, with only a handful of gun-related deaths a year. But as Otto Lovik stood Sunday on a muddy lakeshore overlooking Utoya Island and recalled how he rescued about 60 people fleeing Friday's massacre by a gunman, the 56-year-old prison guard, still shaking from the experience, said his country must change.
WORLD
July 20, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
A long convoy of dust-caked gun trucks descended Wednesday afternoon on downtown Benghazi, horns honking and guns blasting skyward. Rebel fighters had driven nearly 150 miles from Libya's eastern front to celebrate the glory of 11 dead comrades — shuhuda , or martyrs. The dead men, killed the day before, lay in caskets that bounced in the beds of the trucks. They had come home to be buried. Gunmen accompanying the caskets fired assault rifles and pistols over the rooftops as women on balconies ducked for cover.
WORLD
June 8, 2011 | By Roula Hajjar, Los Angeles Times
Funerals in the Yarmouk Palestinian refugee camp near the Syrian capital of Damascus turned violent late Monday as clashes erupted between camp residents and a Syrian-backed Palestinian faction, leading to the deaths of as many as 20 people, according to Palestinian sources and amateur video posted on the Internet. Tension rose during a funeral procession when mourners in the camp denounced the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, General Command, alleging that the faction had persuaded the mourners' relatives to participate in Sunday's deadly demonstrations near the Syrian-Israeli border, said an official of the Palestine Liberation Organization and Palestinian news outlets.
WORLD
June 2, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
The mourners gathered early Wednesday morning. They knew the authorities would not let the former Iranian opposition leader be buried at midday, when his funeral would attract even more followers. Ezzatollah Sahabi, 81, had been among the leaders of Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution and a member of its first government, but later fell out with those in power. He spent his last decades as a dissident, in and out of prison. Sahabi's daughter Haleh, 57, followed in his political footsteps.
WORLD
April 24, 2011 | By Alexandra Sandels and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Syrian security forces opened fire Saturday on protesters mourning the scores of demonstrators killed a day earlier in a deadly repeat of violence against an increasingly bold antigovernment movement. "Stop! Stop!" a voice from a mosque loudspeaker is heard calling out in a video on the Internet as security forces in a white pickup spray gunfire on mourners in the Damascus suburb of Barze. Witnesses reported that 12 people died in Saturday's violence. A compilation of names of the dead by human rights activists showed that at least 107 people were killed Friday in the suburbs of Damascus and smaller cities and towns around the country as forces loyal to the regime of President Bashar Assad attempted to crush a democracy movement inspired by revolutions and uprisings sweeping the Arab world.
WORLD
April 23, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Syrian security forces opened fire Saturday on thousands of angry mourners pouring into the streets in politically charged funeral marches for some of the scores of people shot dead at nationwide mass demonstrations a day earlier, according to witnesses and amateur video footage posted online. At least 107 people were killed in Friday's violence, according to a list of names compiled by a human rights activist. Mourners appeared somber but defiant, chanting, "The people want the overthrow of the regime" as they marched down narrow streets holding coffins aloft, some raising clenched fists, as shown on video footage uploaded to the Internet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Known for her flamboyant hats and dazzling jewelry, Bernice Woods relished being in the public eye. So when the longtime community volunteer and former Compton city councilwoman died last month, her children opted to place her open casket in the drive-thru display window of Robert L. Adams Mortuary in Compton. "My mother was a community person," said Gregory W. Woods, 55, the youngest of the deceased woman's 10 children. "She meant so much to so many people. It is only fitting and proper that she would be viewed this way. " Adams funeral parlor, a fixture in Compton since 1974, brings to the business of death a convenience of the living: drive-thru viewing of the dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
The early arrivals got the good seats, 115 folding chairs facing the pool. Other guests grabbed standing-room-only spots under giant umbrellas or stood blinking in the sun; still others jammed into the living room and family room, watching and listening through open sliding glass doors. "Good morning to all of you, on this beautiful, radiant Sunday," Rabbi Carla Howard began, from a lectern on the far side of the pool. "We come together at the home of Lee and Michael to honor, celebrate and, finally, say goodbye to Lee Ivan Weinstein.
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