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Movie Characters

ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The world loves an imbecile--it's not just the French. After the Nutty Professor, and before Beavis and Butt-head, there was--and, for better or worse, still is--Ernest P. (Powertools) Worrell, the non-savant idiot who currently "rides again" in the fifth installment of the kid-oriented "Ernest" movie series. And each Ernest film has generated at least $25 million at the box office. This one, though, the first to be released independently, opened this weekend with an unpromising $905,000.
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NEWS
October 28, 1993 | ANNE LOUISE BANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expect few surprises when you open the door Sunday night; when it comes to choosing a Halloween costume, most kids want what they see on the screen. Which means if you like purple dinosaurs, balloon pants and shoes with curling, pointed toes, you'll have a great time. Princess Jasmine of Walt Disney's "Aladdin" fame is a big favorite this year for girls, costumers say. Four- and 5-year-olds want to make Barney the Dinosaur more ubiquitous than he already is--if that's possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1993 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one should underestimate the power of myth in American politics. Ronald Reagan constructed his public persona from our collective (and historically dubious) images of individual self-reliance in the frontier West--seasoned with a dash of Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry. In his race for the White House last year, Bill Clinton plugged in directly to the myth of Camelot with the help of a grainy film clip unearthed by Linda Bloodworth-Thomason that symbolically suggested John F.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
It was a strange collection of costumed characters outside a Manhattan office building Monday: a 7-foot hulk with an itsy-bitsy lizard head; a chorus of rapping reindeer; an assortment of mutant something-or-others. Meanwhile, scores of poker-faced people in business suits arrived, dodging the weird gathering outside and braving a packed lobby and elevators inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1992 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the Hollywood sign, a citizens revolt is brewing. Bright orange protest signs have sprouted along the twisting hillside streets below the world-renowned landmark. Angry residents are lambasting what they call the "prostitution" of their neighborhood's famous symbol. The source of the unrest is an odd appendage installed Friday above the letter "D." The appendage and the letter are shrouded, looking rather like an exclamation mark after the word "Hollywoo."
BUSINESS
November 12, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Too bad, Ken. Nowadays, Barbie wants to go steady with Mickey Mouse. Expanding a relationship begun four years ago, Mattel Inc. and Walt Disney Co. announced Monday that the toy maker will sponsor theme-park rides and develop a new collection of toys based on Disney characters. The deal will allow El Segundo-based Mattel to add Bambi, Dumbo and Pinocchio to the list of Disney characters that it makes for infants and preschoolers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interestingly crazy things often happen to old movie genres when they're shoved into new contexts, and a lot of them happen in "Blood and Concrete" (Goldwyn Pavilion). A hybrid, like "Repo Man." it's modern L. A. film noir , set in a hopped-up world of tawdry rock clubs and bare apartments: the palm tree and uppers world high school kids like to call "Hollyweird." The movie, a dark joke about amorality and aimlessness, is set in a recognizable milieu.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1991 | EDWARD SILVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mars needs Arnold. To pass through interplanetary Customs in a scene from last year's sci-fi blockbuster "Total Recall," Schwarzenegger's secret agent, Doug Quaid, is encased in the persona of the Fat Lady. But the disguise begins to malfunction. An ear ejects from the head, the whole of which, startlingly, opens like a stack of Cubist panels, revealing the hunted Quaid. The head recombines in the air above him and levitates.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trash those Batman T-shirts. The clothes coppers, with adult designs on Dick Tracy and Breathless Mahoney, have arrived. And they mean business, Big Boy. Inspired by the new comic book detective movie "Dick Tracy," a handful of designers have already launched lines of movie tie-in fashions and accessories. But unlike the usual selection of sun visors, T-shirts and baseball caps blazing with a movie logo, Tracy togs are closer to actual movie costumes--play clothes for grown-ups.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
About 130 miles off the coast of San Diego, in a claustrophobic, smoke-filled cabin aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence, actor Willem Dafoe is lying on his bunk thinking about Auschwitz. It isn't too difficult. Dafoe has countless hours to while away over the next 10 days in this tiny metallic cabin, which he likens to a prison cell. He is on board the bulky carrier shooting "Flight of the Intruder," a big-budget action film for Paramount.
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