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Movie Characters

BUSINESS
February 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
It was a strange collection of costumed characters outside a Manhattan office building Monday: a 7-foot hulk with an itsy-bitsy lizard head; a chorus of rapping reindeer; an assortment of mutant something-or-others. Meanwhile, scores of poker-faced people in business suits arrived, dodging the weird gathering outside and braving a packed lobby and elevators inside.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1992 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the Hollywood sign, a citizens revolt is brewing. Bright orange protest signs have sprouted along the twisting hillside streets below the world-renowned landmark. Angry residents are lambasting what they call the "prostitution" of their neighborhood's famous symbol. The source of the unrest is an odd appendage installed Friday above the letter "D." The appendage and the letter are shrouded, looking rather like an exclamation mark after the word "Hollywoo."
BUSINESS
November 12, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Too bad, Ken. Nowadays, Barbie wants to go steady with Mickey Mouse. Expanding a relationship begun four years ago, Mattel Inc. and Walt Disney Co. announced Monday that the toy maker will sponsor theme-park rides and develop a new collection of toys based on Disney characters. The deal will allow El Segundo-based Mattel to add Bambi, Dumbo and Pinocchio to the list of Disney characters that it makes for infants and preschoolers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1991 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interestingly crazy things often happen to old movie genres when they're shoved into new contexts, and a lot of them happen in "Blood and Concrete" (Goldwyn Pavilion). A hybrid, like "Repo Man." it's modern L. A. film noir , set in a hopped-up world of tawdry rock clubs and bare apartments: the palm tree and uppers world high school kids like to call "Hollyweird." The movie, a dark joke about amorality and aimlessness, is set in a recognizable milieu.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1991 | EDWARD SILVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mars needs Arnold. To pass through interplanetary Customs in a scene from last year's sci-fi blockbuster "Total Recall," Schwarzenegger's secret agent, Doug Quaid, is encased in the persona of the Fat Lady. But the disguise begins to malfunction. An ear ejects from the head, the whole of which, startlingly, opens like a stack of Cubist panels, revealing the hunted Quaid. The head recombines in the air above him and levitates.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trash those Batman T-shirts. The clothes coppers, with adult designs on Dick Tracy and Breathless Mahoney, have arrived. And they mean business, Big Boy. Inspired by the new comic book detective movie "Dick Tracy," a handful of designers have already launched lines of movie tie-in fashions and accessories. But unlike the usual selection of sun visors, T-shirts and baseball caps blazing with a movie logo, Tracy togs are closer to actual movie costumes--play clothes for grown-ups.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
About 130 miles off the coast of San Diego, in a claustrophobic, smoke-filled cabin aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence, actor Willem Dafoe is lying on his bunk thinking about Auschwitz. It isn't too difficult. Dafoe has countless hours to while away over the next 10 days in this tiny metallic cabin, which he likens to a prison cell. He is on board the bulky carrier shooting "Flight of the Intruder," a big-budget action film for Paramount.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988 | Randy Lewis
Did you ever consider what happens to movie characters when the film ends and the projector is turned off? One person who apparently hasn't is John Williams, the prolific composer of sound-track music for "Jaws," "Star Wars," "E.T., The Extraterrestrial," "Raiders of the Lost Ark," "Superman" and countless other blockbusters of supernatural proportions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Hard Choices" (Laemmle's Los Feliz and Monica 4-Plex) is all nerves and gristle and bunched-up sinew--a taut little film without any fat. It begins quietly and easily--by the sunlight and splash of a rural stream--and immediately starts racing toward darkness and deadly confrontations. The movie keeps surprising you. For the first few minutes, it seems to be another low-budget American "heartland" film about a struggling, poor white Tennessee family.
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