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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
The ad line that Universal Pictures has been using in its Oscar campaign for Phil Alden Robinson's "Field of Dreams," a fantasy baseball-theme picture released last spring, is "Remember the feeling." Enough members of the Directors Guild of America remembered to give Robinson the feeling of being a nominee for the DGA's 1989 best-director award.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 49th annual Directors Guild of America nominations were as notable for their omissions as for those who made the cut. The five nominees announced Tuesday were Anthony Minghella ("The English Patient"), Joel Coen ("Fargo"), Cameron Crowe ("Jerry Maguire"), Mike Leigh ("Secrets & Lies") and Scott Hicks ("Shine"). Left out of the field were Milos Forman, who won the Golden Globe best director award on Sunday night, and Alan Parker, whose "Evita" was selected best comedy or musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When director Barry Sonnenfeld watched his new Warner Bros. feature "Wild Wild West" last week--finally complete with visual effects and soundtrack--he was moved to plant a triumphant kiss on rerecording mixer Kevin O'Connell. "The first time that's happened to me in 21 years," the 13-time Oscar-nominated sound artist joked, rolling his eyes. Starring Will Smith and Kevin Kline, the update of CBS' fantasy-western TV series of the 1960s will be released June 30.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1996 | GLENN LOVELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much about Michael Bay shouts, "Caution: Hot Young Director in Motion!"--the way he takes over a room, the way he races through a story, especially the way he makes movies. In high-stakes Hollywood, where a minute's delay on a shoot can mean thousands of dollars in overruns and fines, speed can make you a bigger hero than Keanu Reeves on a booby-trapped bus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | GUY GARCIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mind-jarring clash of cultures--and the traumatic birth of a new nation--is the subject of Salvador Carrasco's "The Other Conquest," a historical drama that explores the religious and political roots of Mexico through the prism of the human soul. "The Other Conquest," which is the first Spanish-language film ever to be entered in competition at the AFI Los Angeles International Film Festival, is described by its 31-year-old director as "a parable about cultural tolerance."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | BILL KROHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jerry Lewis called him Teacher, and Porky Pig might have done the same. Filmmakers as different as Jean-Luc Godard, Joe Dante, Wim Wenders, Robert Zemeckis and Eric Rohmer learned from him. His films defined the '50s in all their crassness and exuberance. Yet director Frank Tashlin is virtually forgotten today, even in Europe, where his critical reputation was born. The tribute to Tashlin beginning Thursday at UCLA's Melnitz Hall heralds a long-overdue revival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Todd Solondz has turned the myth of Sundance inside out and upside down. His "Welcome to the Dollhouse," a biting and funny look at the miseries of childhood that manages to be scathing, sensitive and original, is one of the most admired films in the dramatic competition, and, according to the festival cliche, a wondrous studio contract should be the reward. Except that writer-director Solondz, a wry and engaging 36-year-old New Yorker, has already had his studio experience. Ten years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samuel Fuller, who liked to direct with a cigar in one hand and sometimes a .45 in the other, received the accolades at a near-three-hour memorial tribute Saturday morning at the Directors Guild that had largely eluded him during his many years in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The International Film Festival has made a name for itself in this venerable resort town through its ability to contain multitudes as well as attract them. While glamorous stars in evening dress dominate the event's image, the reality is that provocative and serious filmmakers of every stripe risk looking incongruous amid all the froufrou because they know that Cannes is where they need to be.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1990 | JAMES GREENBERG
"Suffering is more cinematic than happiness," says Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski on a subject that East European filmmakers perhaps know better than anyone else. But now with the end of 45 years of communist domination, filmmaking, like every other aspect of life in East Europe, is adjusting to the new demands of freedom. The oppression may be over, but the cinematic future of the region is far from settled.
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