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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ads call Madonna's new movie "the erotic thriller of the year." But anyone under age 17 can see the pop star bare her breasts and make steamy love to Willem Dafoe in "Body of Evidence"--if they are accompanied by an adult. It's rated R. On the other hand, the movie industry's toughest warning to parents was given to the upcoming "Wide Sargasso Sea," an art-house film that has only modest lovemaking scenes compared to "Body of Evidence" or last year's R-rated "Basic Instinct."
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OPINION
January 28, 2014
Re "Homeboy Industries is a struggling success story," Column, Jan. 26 While Steve Lopez was interviewing the inimitable Father Gregory Boyle last Wednesday, two of his Homeboy Industries success stories were guiding 50 kids from Venice High School's POPS club around the premises, telling us the stories of their rebuilt lives. In two hours, our students - whose lives are touched by prison, with a parent or another loved one inside - were changed forever. The moment we stepped off the bus and the kids recognized rival gang members and saw them shaking hands, working side by side, their eyes, ears and hearts expanded.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2000 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1994, when Kimberly Peirce decided to make a short film about the life and tragic death of Brandon Teena, she didn't know that she was beginning a five-year odyssey that would result in the making of her first feature-length movie. Nor did she realize the difficulty of finding the story within the morass of contradictory details. And she had no idea that she was wading into a contentious and continuing debate over artistic license and a filmmaker's obligation to accuracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
For much of last year, Amy Pascal was under fire. The co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment presided over two of last year's big-budget bombs, "After Earth" and "White House Down. " Her studio reported losses of $181 million for the summer months. Activist investor Daniel Loeb hammered Pascal's division, demanding an end to the "free passes" Sony studio executives got when their films disappointed and calling on parent company Sony Corp. to spin off part of its entertainment business.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1999 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An old show business adage is that everyone wants to get in on the act, which is what's happening in Sacramento as legislators scramble to propose bills to give tax breaks to Hollywood to keep and develop entertainment jobs in California.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 43-year-old porn actor Tyce Bune goes to work these days, he makes sure to pack something extra in his briefcase along with the usual script and change of clothes: a vial of Viagra tablets. On a typical day, when filming can stretch on for 14 hours, Bune will strip down and have sex in front of a camera crew as many as three times. During busy times, he might work five days a week.
OPINION
August 20, 2013
Re “ Film tax credits rip off states ,” Column, Aug. 4 Michael Hiltzik raised some good points but left out many important facts about the success of California's Film and Television Incentive Program. He raised questions on how we incentivize film production to stay here in California. As the author of AB 3, legislation seeking to extend the incentive program next year, stakeholders and I have been working for months to see how we can make improvements. Hiltzik cited a letter by the Legislative Analyst's Office to show that film tax credits aren't a good deal for Californians.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
For much of last year, Amy Pascal was under fire. The co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment presided over two of last year's big-budget bombs, "After Earth" and "White House Down. " Her studio reported losses of $181 million for the summer months. Activist investor Daniel Loeb hammered Pascal's division, demanding an end to the "free passes" Sony studio executives got when their films disappointed and calling on parent company Sony Corp. to spin off part of its entertainment business.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1998 | Denise Gellene
Two government-funded advertising campaigns are putting the motion picture industry on the defensive. As part of an effort funded by its settlement with Big Tobacco, Florida is running print ads developed with input from teens that attack film images of smoking. "Attention movie industry," said an ad that ran recently in The Times and Hollywood trades. "We're your best customers. So why are you trying to kill us?"
BUSINESS
July 17, 2000 | Reuters
The motion picture industry hopes to stem a potential flood of digital video piracy in a civil case to open today in which Hollywood studios have accused a computer journalist of violating a still untested 1998 federal law that aims to protect digital media. Eric Corley, publisher of 2600 (http://www.2600.org), a magazine and Web site of the computer hacker underground, is set to stand trial for spreading a utility that allows digital video discs (DVDs) to be copied and transmitted over the Web.
SPORTS
December 22, 2013 | By David Wharton
The bugler in his green coat and top hat tried to sound upbeat as he blew the traditional "Call to Post," but he might just as well have been playing a dirge. Down by the rail, Todd Matzner listened with a cigar stub clamped between his teeth. "I wasn't going to miss this, no way," the horse racing die-hard said. "Even if it's kind of sad. " Sunday marked the last gasp for Betfair Hollywood Park, a 75-year-old racetrack that had once been a sparkling jewel of the city. The Inglewood landmark, which has fallen victim to declining revenue industrywide, will have its grandstand razed and its racing ovals dug up. Shops, offices and residential units are planned for the spot where fans once cheered for horses such as Seabiscuit and Zenyatta, not to mention renowned jockeys Bill Shoemaker and Laffit Pincay Jr. "The track's closure is a major loss," said Alex Waldrop, president and chief executive of the National Thoroughbred Racing Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO - Watching Steve McQueen's achingly brilliant "12 Years a Slave" at the Toronto International Film Festival, I was struck by many things. The film's artistry - script, performances, imagery - is significant. The movie is beautifully, painfully wrought at every turn. But in a larger sense, it stands as a striking testament to how much the texture and tenor of conversations about race have changed through the prism of film in the years since Barack Obama took office. Quite simply there are more movies that specifically address black-white friction in modern terms - the many shades of human interaction more starkly framed by the color of one's skin.
OPINION
August 20, 2013
Re “ Film tax credits rip off states ,” Column, Aug. 4 Michael Hiltzik raised some good points but left out many important facts about the success of California's Film and Television Incentive Program. He raised questions on how we incentivize film production to stay here in California. As the author of AB 3, legislation seeking to extend the incentive program next year, stakeholders and I have been working for months to see how we can make improvements. Hiltzik cited a letter by the Legislative Analyst's Office to show that film tax credits aren't a good deal for Californians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By DiAngelea Millar
They may not be as well known as Marilyn Monroe and Audrey Hepburn, but the top stars of India's film industry are coming to Hollywood -- in wax form. Madame Tussauds Hollywood will unveil five new figures Thursday in its traveling exhibit focusing on Bollywood, the Indian movie industry. “The Hollywood location has a whole area dedicated to movies and film,” said Colin Thomas, general manager of the Hollywood wax museum. “We have an eclectic mix of film stars [and] this brings a whole different set of characters to the location.” PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times This will be the exhibit's debut on the West Coast to celebrate Bollywood's 100 th anniversary, Thomas said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
California-made and -set films often turn up at LAFF. Among this year's standouts: "Fruitvale Station" This feature debut from writer-director Ryan Coogler is a gripping drama drawn from the real-life incident in which a 22-year-old man was killed by transit police in an Oakland train station on New Year's Day 2009. Starring Michael B. Jordan in a stirring turn, the film finds dramatic tension in the struggles of the everyday and builds to the tragedy of a life cut short. Having won major prizes at Sundance this year and with the Weinstein Co. now behind it, "Fruitvale Station" should remain in the conversation for months to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before finding out who took my "Mad Men" screener. The Skinny: I'm on the fence with Fox's "The Following," which is so grim it is sometimes hard to watch. That said, the cast is terrific. Tuesday's headlines include stories on the end of Daily Variety, a big deal for media mogul John Malone, Tom Cruise may have a new movie, and Hollywood's race to blow up the White House.  Daily Dose: Daily Variety, which published its final print edition Tuesday (see below)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1986 | JACK MATHEWS
True or false: Most of the movies shown in movie theaters today don't look the same as they did 20 years ago. Answer: True. They look worse! True or false: Television's "Dynasty" is shot on film, but if you tried to project it onto a large screen in a theater, it wouldn't look as good as most movies that are made for the big screen. Answer: False. It would look better!
BUSINESS
December 31, 1996 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Those who think the movie industry will get runaway costs under control in 1997 should think again. Studio honchos readily admit they're addicted to "event pictures"--the buzz words of 1996--and have no intention of kicking the expensive habit any time soon. They figure their energies and resources are better risked on hugely exploitable films like "Independence Day" that can generate megaprofits worldwide than on mid-size ones where returns are minimal at best.
OPINION
February 19, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
"We need to buy a movie studio. " Amid the conferences, panels, meetings and informal conversations in the wake of the presidential election, this idea has been a near constant among conservatives who feel like the country is slipping through their fingers. Mitt Romney and the Republican National Committee combined raised just more than $1 billion, and all we got are these lousy T-shirts. Since conservatives are losing the culture, goes the argument, which in turn leads to losing at politics, maybe that money could be better spent on producing some cultural ammo of our own?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even in 1912, movies audiences had their favorite stars. Like Maurice Costello, the great-grandfather of Drew Barrymore. In the lighthearted "The Picture Idol," a devoted fan can't stop following him. So Costello sets up a clever ruse of introducing the female admirer to a phony wife and child so she will leave him alone. "The Picture Idol" is one of the many films screening during the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' program "A Century Ago: The Films of 1912" Thursday evening at the Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood.
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