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Movie Industry Hong Kong

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BUSINESS
March 21, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the old Kai Tak International Airport here, speeding sports cars bear down on four teenagers standing at one end of the broad concrete runway that juts into Victoria Harbor. One teen, Nicholas Tse, flashes a defiant, fearless sneer at the approaching Ferraris, which brake to a stop just short of the unflinching youths. Hong Kong's movie studios, desperate to find a new star to save their struggling industry, are hoping audiences will come to know and love that sneer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only a year ago, the world's fifth-largest filmmaking center languished in the wreckage of Asia's 1997 financial crisis, but grabbing the tail of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"--and other Asian productions--the Hong Kong film industry is poised for recovery. European films nabbed more honors at this year's Cannes International Film Festival, but outside the official competition it was clear that Hong Kong filmmakers were on a roll.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Action films of Hong Kong are the focus of a two-week series opening today at the AMC MainPlace 6 Theatres. "Festival Hong Kong" will feature 14 films through May 20. Playing today and Saturday are "A Chinese Ghost Story," about a young tax collector who falls in love with a spirit and must battle a demon with a mile-long tongue, and "Peking Opera Blues," a suspense thriller set after the Chinese revolution of 1911.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time to record slices of life in Hong Kong as it was shifting from British colony to Chinese "special administrative region," dynamic filmmaker Fruit Chan began a trilogy of films set in this transitional period. In the process he revitalized Hong Kong's independent film movement. Chan, whose real name is Chan Kuo, emerges as a major talent in world cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1997 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sunday's Calendar reported on how Hong Kong actors and directors view their career opportunities after the hand-over. Today, a visit to the location of a film being made about the historic event. * The taxi driver balks when I ask to go to Central--Wayne Wang's latest film, "Chinese Box," is shooting near the Central Market, and to get there we have to pass through downtown Hong Kong.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When director Peter Chan heard about Walt Disney Co.'s recent tussle with China over a film on the exiled Dalai Lama, he was hardly surprised. After all, in recent months Hong Kong's leading movie makers--who led the charge into mainland China--have quietly suffered far greater censorship by Beijing officials, including having their films banned, slashed and sanitized.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hong Kong, a region with a population of a mere 6.7 million, has produced one of the world's most influential film industries, especially when it comes to action. And much credit for that kinetic genre, the Hong Kong action film, goes to one man: Tsui Hark. Over the last two decades, he has directed or produced 50 feature films, including some of the classics of the genre. For a while, he exhibited the Midas touch: Everything with which he was involved turned to box-office gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996 | David Kronke, David Kronke is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Jackie Chan is plotting his escape from this interview. The room is essentially empty, save for two chairs, one lined up behind the other; Chan sits backward in his chair, facing his inquisitor in the other chair. He sizes up the situation. "I'm handcuffed, and you're the bad guy, just sitting there," Chan says--hypothetically, of course. "I'm sitting here," he continues, rocking his chair playfully, an impish expression on his face. "And you're reading a newspaper, and then I get up."
BUSINESS
November 18, 1994 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Raymond Chow is too modest a man to say so himself, but he has lots to boast about these days. The man who introduced kung fu star Bruce Lee to America and transformed Jackie Chan from an actresses' stunt double to a millionaire martial arts performer has another hit. The initial public offering of stock in Chow's Golden Harvest Entertainment Ltd. was a smash last week, with many eager investors shut out as the offering was 52 times oversubscribed. Chow raised $29 million in the offering.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only a year ago, the world's fifth-largest filmmaking center languished in the wreckage of Asia's 1997 financial crisis, but grabbing the tail of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"--and other Asian productions--the Hong Kong film industry is poised for recovery. European films nabbed more honors at this year's Cannes International Film Festival, but outside the official competition it was clear that Hong Kong filmmakers were on a roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hong Kong, a region with a population of a mere 6.7 million, has produced one of the world's most influential film industries, especially when it comes to action. And much credit for that kinetic genre, the Hong Kong action film, goes to one man: Tsui Hark. Over the last two decades, he has directed or produced 50 feature films, including some of the classics of the genre. For a while, he exhibited the Midas touch: Everything with which he was involved turned to box-office gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2000 | ANNE BERGMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Throughout more than 20 years and 40 films, Hong Kong action star Jackie Chan had a seemingly far-fetched dream: to make a Hollywood western. Now, with the release Friday of "Shanghai Noon," Chan's dream comes true. "The original idea was mine," says Chan by telephone from New York between rehearsals for his May 20 guest shot on "Saturday Night Live." "But no one would listen to me in Hong Kong because making an American movie is so expensive." But after proving his bankability in the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the old Kai Tak International Airport here, speeding sports cars bear down on four teenagers standing at one end of the broad concrete runway that juts into Victoria Harbor. One teen, Nicholas Tse, flashes a defiant, fearless sneer at the approaching Ferraris, which brake to a stop just short of the unflinching youths. Hong Kong's movie studios, desperate to find a new star to save their struggling industry, are hoping audiences will come to know and love that sneer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1998 | Michael X. Ferraro, Michael X. Ferraro is a freelance writer in Los Angeles and occasional contributor to Calendar
"Beware!" Screaming from screens with silver are word droppings that you dare not to show to your skullholes. . . . --Headline of this story, if translated by a Hong Kong film studio For those watching foreign films, subtitles are generally a necessary evil, but if you happen to be a Hong Kong action buff, the captions on the bottom of the screen are nearly as entertaining as the action above.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1998 | ALISON DAKOTA GEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maggie Cheung has tried her hand--or should that be feet?--at on-screen martial arts. But the Hong Kong actress has never quite developed the proficiency for round-house kicks and temple chops that has made her industry colleague, Michelle Yeoh, into an international star. "I tried to do kung fu, but I'm not very good," Cheung says, almost apologizing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1997 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sunday's Calendar reported on how Hong Kong actors and directors view their career opportunities after the hand-over. Today, a visit to the location of a film being made about the historic event. * The taxi driver balks when I ask to go to Central--Wayne Wang's latest film, "Chinese Box," is shooting near the Central Market, and to get there we have to pass through downtown Hong Kong.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just in time to record slices of life in Hong Kong as it was shifting from British colony to Chinese "special administrative region," dynamic filmmaker Fruit Chan began a trilogy of films set in this transitional period. In the process he revitalized Hong Kong's independent film movement. Chan, whose real name is Chan Kuo, emerges as a major talent in world cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1993 | ALISON DAKOTA GEE, Alison Dakota Gee, who writes about Cantonese film, lives in Los Angeles and Hong Kong. She is pursuing her doctorate in Cantonese film at the University of Hong Kong
"There's always that threat of violence," says Paul Fonoroff somewhat matter-of-factly about the occupational hazards that come with being one of Hong Kong's most prominent film critics. Known around the territory as "Mr. Film," the 39-year-old native of Cleveland reviews Cantonese-language films for the English-language newspaper the South China Morning Post and RTKH, the No. 1 Cantonese radio station.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Edward Wong, Edward Wong is a freelance writer based in San Francisco
Pursued by police, an assassin drives higher and higher into the night-shrouded mountains above Hong Kong. The island's towering cityscape falls away below him. He pulls over to the side of the road. Lighting a cigarette, the killer gazes out at the sea of lights that has come to symbolize one of the world's most dynamic cities. "I never realized how beautiful Hong Kong looks at night," he says. "But something so beautiful can disappear so quickly."
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When director Peter Chan heard about Walt Disney Co.'s recent tussle with China over a film on the exiled Dalai Lama, he was hardly surprised. After all, in recent months Hong Kong's leading movie makers--who led the charge into mainland China--have quietly suffered far greater censorship by Beijing officials, including having their films banned, slashed and sanitized.
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