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Movie Industry Southern California

ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Burbank nice guy Bob Rogers can sometimes sound like a modest Hollywood film producer: "I want my work to touch the mind and the heart. I want to tell stories." Or he can talk like a techno-philosopher: "The man who owns a hammer sees every nail as a problem." Or like a cinematic dreamer: "I want to think beyond the rectangle." Sounds like heavy stuff out of Burbank. But unlike Oakland, there's a there there as Rogers and his neighborhood go for bigger prizes.
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BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Imagine a business that hasn't changed much in 64 years. Price and quality aren't related. There's often no easy way to find out which products are available. Credit cards aren't accepted, and you can't order by phone. Now imagine that your business, an unusually risky one but a linchpin of the region's economy, depends on this other business. Wouldn't you be a little concerned? One hopes so. We're talking here about the movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
A joint effort among state, county and city officials to keep Hollywood filmmakers from leaving California to make movies is showing modest but tangible results for Orange County. Film-making is increasing in some Orange County cities and could double this year in unincorporated areas, according to figures released recently by the Orange County film liaison office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990 | FRANK MESSINA
Clutching a tub of popcorn as big as her lap, 9-year-old Deanne Bailes shrieked when the bigger-than-life image of Michael J. Fox dived into his futuristic DeLorean sports car and vanished with a thunderclap and an explosion of light. Her squeal of excitement matched that of her mother, 41-year-old Donna Riles. The Los Alamitos woman jumped when the sports car disappeared, her left knee jerking against the tub, scattering popcorn onto her teen-age son sitting in the next seat.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
After nearly 15 years in the corporate offices of the Edwards Theatres Circuit--and 52 years as daughter of the company patriarch--Joan Edwards Randolph says she still didn't feel equipped to manage a theater on her own. "I started working in the office 15 years ago as a bookkeeper," said Randolph, the company's executive vice president and chief financial officer. "Although I had been exposed to theaters all my life, I'd never been involved in making the decisions on their operations . . .
BUSINESS
January 17, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
The story of James Edwards Sr. reads like the plot of a Hollywood melodrama: Dapper octogenarian fends off forces of revolution with old-fashioned commitment to excellence and saves family business for future generations. Although the tale has yet to be optioned by a studio, chances are that the Edwards name can be found at a theater near you--if not now, soon--but it's above the marquee and not on the silver screen.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1987 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Hooray for Canada. And Texas, North Carolina, Arkansas, Wyoming, Florida, Illinois and all the other places that want to be the next Hollywood. The names may not sound glamorous and there are no "Hooray for Hollywood" songs penned for them yet. But these and other areas where it is cheaper to make films and television shows are increasingly siphoning off movie and television business from Southern California to the tune of about $1 billion a year, according to state officials.
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