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Movie Industry Women

ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1991 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
In an interview published a few months ago in the now-defunct national sports daily the National, baseball commissioner and former Columbia Pictures executive Fay Vincent was asked why people are angry about the exorbitant salaries paid to baseball players and not about those paid to movie stars. The commissioner's answer was like a little manifesto of sexism, even though gender was hardly mentioned.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just how hard is it being a woman director, dealing with male bonding? It's one thing, says Nancy Savoca, on a business level, just to break through the buddy system that is upper-echelon movie studio management. It's another thing altogether to earn the trust of actors and direct scenes of sexism in vivid action.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
High atop a mountain overlooking the small town that was the site of the 18th annual Telluride Film Festival this week, director Martha Coolidge had every reason to feel on top professionally as well as altitudinally. Here, at the festival's mountaintop Labor Day picnic, Coolidge was the most sought-after of the filmmakers who had ascended the long ski lift for lunch and an outdoor seminar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women in the film and television business are moving into more powerful decision-making jobs, but they are still not represented at the highest levels of most companies, according to a study conducted by Women in Film to be released today. "The 'glass ceiling' has cracked, but it's still there," said Sally Steenland, who surveyed 20 companies and wrote the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
The May sweeps--April 24 to May 22--will see a host of TV movies featuring lead actresses who are at the edge of 40--and beyond. CBS has two: JoBeth Williams is featured in "Victim of Love" May 5, about a woman in the middle of a dangerous love triangle. Ellen Burstyn, in "Running Out," May 12 plays an aging woman whose increasing loss of memory and other faculties prevent her from properly caring for her 9-year-old grandson.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Julie Andrews makes no bones about why, at age 55, she's making her first TV movie, a drama called "Our Sons" about AIDS and prejudice airing next month on ABC: "I don't think that many scripts come across your desk--a good role for an actress. In any given year." "Over a certain age," chimes in her co-star, Ann-Margret, 49. "How many times does a wonderful whopping good role come across your desk?," Andrews emphasizes. "Not that often." Ann-Margret laughs. "For a woman over 25."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
The numbers speak for themselves: There is not one woman in a position to give final approval to send a film into production at eight major studios surveyed by the Times. And of 45 films released by the same eight studios during the four-month period from June through September of this year, only one--Columbia Pictures' "Postcards From the Edge"--had female leads and told a woman's story.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA
The rumor swept across town like a summer brush-fire, as incendiary as it was unsubstantiated: The head of a major studio had distributed a memo to the top brass counseling them to sidestep all "female-driven" projects--no matter which actresses were "attached." Another version put the message a bit differently: Though women are fine in secondary roles such as helpmates or girlfriends, beware of awarding them leads.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"C'est la Vie," her fifth film, opened the Women in Film Festival two weeks ago. But if you call Diane Kurys a woman director , be prepared for some verbal fireworks. "I'm a woman so I have to be a feminist," Kurys says, in excellent if heavily accented English, sipping coffee at the Four Seasons Hotel as she awaited the L.A. opening of "C'est la Vie." "But I resent the idea of being grouped with women. I'd rather belong to a club of short filmmakers or blue-eyed filmmakers.
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