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Movie Industry Women

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1994 | ANNE BERGMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty women, age 18-23, were all desperately seeking to break into filmmaking. So they took out a full-page ad in the May 13 issue of Entertainment Weekly that read: "Please, please, please, please, please, can we have some money to finish our film? Before you say no, picture this: Twenty ethnically diverse young women with vision, passion, and absolutely no money."
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NEWS
June 26, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Michele Ohayon and Tyis Conners had little reason to meet before last month. Separated by distance, money and age, the two shared little in common except for a vision of women in film. These days, Ohayon, a 34-year-old film director from Los Feliz, and Conners, a 14-year-old 10th-grader, spend at least two hours each Saturday discussing filmmaking as part of a series of workshops aimed at giving South-Central teen-agers a taste of Hollywood.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1994 | CATHERINE JORDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a group of pistol-packing prostitutes in stylish chaps took to the screen last weekend in "Bad Girls," they officially ushered in Hollywood's new tough-gal era. The critically panned Western from 20th Century Fox, which took in a respectable if unspectacular $5 million, is the first in a coming stampede of movies placing women in traditional tough-guy roles. Nearly three dozen movies with actresses as everything from pirates to pool hustlers are set to follow the "Bad Girls" trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1993 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For women in the entertainment industry, it is the ultimate irony: that Hollywood's ballyhooed Year of the Woman has been followed by the Summer of Heidi. "That's certainly the topper," one female screenwriter says sarcastically, echoing a popular complaint in a town where substantial women's roles are unusual, actresses over 40 have a tough time finding work and women directors are a rare breed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Laudatory awards shows are the routine stuff of Hollywood, and Friday's 17th Annual Women in Film luncheon easily could have fallen into instant hazy memory if not for the uninhibited remarks by recipient Michelle Pfeiffer. Taking the podium to accept her Crystal Award, the last of several given out during the ceremonies recognizing individuals who "represent the highest ideals of the film and television industry," the actress admonished some of the people there to honor her. "So . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Edward James Olmos stands amid the cacti in the desert, a brilliantly plumed fighting rooster cradled in his right arm, a cellular phone glued to his left ear. A black cowboy hat with a feather in its band shields the actor from the midday sun. Sans phone, he is El Gallo, the long-absent patriarch who rules the roost around these parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992 | Ryan Murphy
Two years ago, former producer Julia Phillips set the town on its ear with her No. 1 bestseller "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," a scathing tale of her own rise and fall that pretty much reinvented the kiss-and-tell Hollywood tome. Not one to rest on her laurels, Phillips is working on a follow-up that has a few of the movie industry's most powerful women on pins and needles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
The Oscar ceremonies, marked this year by controversy over the role of women in the film industry, will be designed next year to honor women, organizers said Wednesday. "Oscar Celebrates Women and the Movies" will be the theme of the 65th Academy Awards, film and TV producer Gilbert Cates revealed at an event where it was announced that he will produce the internationally televised awards show for a fourth consecutive year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | Ryan Murphy
In March, even while the best actress Oscar race of '91 was being determined, the battle for the '92 statue had pretty much been called. Two-time nominee Michelle Pfeiffer, according to industry sources and Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences insiders, was considered a shoo-in. At that point, the actress had three films scheduled for release this year: "Batman Returns," the intimate period piece "Love Field" and the Martin Scorsese drama "The Age of Innocence." How could she lose?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1991 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic for Newsday
In an interview published a few months ago in the now-defunct national sports daily the National, baseball commissioner and former Columbia Pictures executive Fay Vincent was asked why people are angry about the exorbitant salaries paid to baseball players and not about those paid to movie stars. The commissioner's answer was like a little manifesto of sexism, even though gender was hardly mentioned.
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