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Movie Industry Women

ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
'Traditionally, animation has been dominated by men, but today the best animators are women," declares Jules Engel, head of the experimental animation department at CalArts. "Women are taking animation into complex new thematic terrain--I don't know any male animator in America presently making work that has the presence and originality I've been seeing in work by women filmmakers."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1995 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KLOS talk-show hosts Mark and Brian had a bet. The loser had to go see "Little Women." When informed of the banter, the film's screenwriter, Robin Swicord, wasn't surprised. Anything having to do with women has lower status, she observes--a bias both the motion picture academy and the industry reflect.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1995 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The most immediately apparent point made by "Movies She Wrote: Women Screenwriters in the Hollywood Studios," a UCLA Film and Television Archive series that begins Thursday, is that men haven't cornered the market on mediocrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Anne Bergman
About six months ago, two women working in the film industry found themselves musing over cocktails at the Dresden Room in Los Angeles, wondering why it was that so many of their peers were excluded from the Hollywood Boys Club. When, they asked each other, would female filmmakers finally get the break they deserved? What had happened to the Year of the Woman, anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Richard Natale
If Jessica Lange garners a best actress nomination for "Blue Sky"--as many in Hollywood are speculating--it will give new meaning to the word "underdog," says her publicist, Pat Kingsley, with a laugh. It will also be somewhat of a comeback for the actress who has been off screen since "Night and the City" two years ago. Yet the film for which she's getting all the hoopla was shot in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1994 | ANNE BERGMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty women, age 18-23, were all desperately seeking to break into filmmaking. So they took out a full-page ad in the May 13 issue of Entertainment Weekly that read: "Please, please, please, please, please, can we have some money to finish our film? Before you say no, picture this: Twenty ethnically diverse young women with vision, passion, and absolutely no money."
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Michele Ohayon and Tyis Conners had little reason to meet before last month. Separated by distance, money and age, the two shared little in common except for a vision of women in film. These days, Ohayon, a 34-year-old film director from Los Feliz, and Conners, a 14-year-old 10th-grader, spend at least two hours each Saturday discussing filmmaking as part of a series of workshops aimed at giving South-Central teen-agers a taste of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1994 | VERA DIKA
Robin Swicord could be a heroine in one of her own screenplays: a woman overcoming the odds to triumph--if still rather anonymously. Consider: * She has three films slated for production over the next few months: "Little Women," to star Winona Ryder as Jo, at Columbia; "The Perez Family," starring Marisa Tomei and Anjelica Huston, at Goldwyn; and "Matilda," an adaptation of the Roald Dahl novel that she co-scripted with her husband, screenwriter Nick Kazan.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1994 | CATHERINE JORDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a group of pistol-packing prostitutes in stylish chaps took to the screen last weekend in "Bad Girls," they officially ushered in Hollywood's new tough-gal era. The critically panned Western from 20th Century Fox, which took in a respectable if unspectacular $5 million, is the first in a coming stampede of movies placing women in traditional tough-guy roles. Nearly three dozen movies with actresses as everything from pirates to pool hustlers are set to follow the "Bad Girls" trail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1994 | NANCY SPILLER
To the casual observer, Femme Fatales magazine might just be another cleavage report from the Hollywood fringe, a girlie rag for males too young to buy Playboy or Penthouse. True, FF, a quarterly devoted to B-movie queens, is plump with pictures of scantily clad women staring open-mouthed into the camera.
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