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TRAVEL
January 28, 2009 | By Whitney Friedlander, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's only a matter of time before local film and TV buffs experience a sense of déjà vu around Los Angeles. That place looks familiar. Did you see it on the way home from work, or when you checked in with your favorite characters? Could be both. Most productions not filmed on studio lots are shot within the 30-mile zone (known as the TMZ) from Beverly and La Cienega boulevards, with some locations more popular than others. "There are so many factors that go into choosing a location and it becomes a huge juggling act," says Geoffrey Smith, a longtime location manager and director of community relations for FilmLA, an organization that processes film, TV and commercial production permits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Michael Ordona
In the freezing forests of Belarus, as the Nazis swept through Europe, handfuls of Jewish refugees banded together under the leadership of the Bielski brothers to survive the killing winter and beyond. But they didn't just survive; they struck back, attacking German soldiers and collaborators, performing acts of sabotage and supporting other partisan groups. All told, the Bielskis are said to have rescued about 1,200 Jews. And you've probably never heard of them until now.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood would get a little unexpected boost from the proposed $700-billion bailout of the nation's financial system. The bill wending its way through Congress would provide tax breaks worth more than $470 million over the next decade for movie and TV producers that shoot in the U.S. That's not a lot of money, given that the average studio movie costs $106.6 million to make and market, but it could keep some low-budget productions -- and jobs -- from going offshore.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Cambridge University wants to shed its elitist image. It thinks soap operas can help. The university said Tuesday that it had written to producers of Britain's three leading soaps -- "EastEnders," "Coronation Street" and "Emmerdale" -- encouraging them to include Cambridge in their story lines. Spokesman Greg Hayman said the approach to the shows -- which are set in, respectively, a gritty London neighborhood, a gritty Manchester neighborhood and a farming village -- was part of a bid to correct the perception that Cambridge was "not for young people from ordinary backgrounds."
BUSINESS
June 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Film and television production soared in Los Angeles in recent weeks as studios rushed to finish projects before a labor agreement with actors expires Monday night. Permits issued for television dramas more than tripled to 119 in the five weeks ended Tuesday, according to FilmL.A. Inc., the nonprofit company that regulates filming in Los Angeles County.
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