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Movie Ratings

ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The plot of the new "South Park" movie seems torn from today's headlines: Young kids sneak into an R-rated movie and become so entranced by the four-letter words they hear on screen that they can't stop using them. Their parents and eventually the government are so outraged that they take drastic action--everything from implanting a V-chip in a child to declaring war.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Warner Bros. is in advanced negotiations to acquire the popular movie ratings website Flixster, signaling the studio's big push into social networking. The Time Warner Inc.-owned studio is now the most likely buyer of privately owned Flixster Inc. and would pay close to $90 million in cash, according to people familiar with the matter. San Francisco-based Flixster allows consumers to rate and comment on movies, as well as see what others think of films using social networking tools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Henry Herx, who for more than 30 years prepared the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' movie ratings and wrote reviews that were distributed by the Catholic News Service, has died. He was 79. Herx died Wednesday at his home in Ramsey, N.J., of complications from liver cancer, his family told the Catholic News Service. Herx also edited movie guides, including "Our Sunday Visitor's Family Guide to Movies and Videos," in which he evaluated thousands of titles through the prism of Catholic doctrine and took stock of sexual content, violence and offensive language.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Smoke and mirrors" is how filmmaker Matt Stone recently described the Motion Picture Assn. of America's movie rating system. "Hypocritical . . . and broken-down," wrote film critic Roger Ebert. "Political artifice," opined Peter Bart, the editor of Variety. "A de facto censorship board," agreed the Broadcast Film Critics Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major hurdle in testing the effectiveness of the Motion Picture Assn. of America's new NC-17 adults-only movie rating was cleared Thursday when the New York Times issued a new policy accepting advertising for all MPAA-rated films, providing the ads themselves are in good taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS
As the controversy over the Motion Picture Assn. of America's movie ratings system edges toward a potentially noisy showdown on Oct. 3, the date of Universal Pictures' appeal of the X rating given Phil Kaufman's "Henry & June," a new enemy--or at least a new player--has moved into the frame.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | MARK CARO, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
As moviegoers, we are a nation of children. How else to explain the fact that the U.S., unlike England and Canada, lacks a working movie rating that indicates a film is for adults, not kids? Sure, in theory there's the NC-17, an abbreviation of "No Children 17 and under," but for all practical purposes that rating doesn't exist. Since the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX
"Boxing Helena," a graphic film about a woman whose arms and legs are amputated by her doctor after an auto accident and then is kept in a box, has become the latest high-profile movie recommended for the adults-only NC-17 rating. Carl Mazzocone, the producer of "Boxing Helena," said he was informed of the NC-17 rating on Monday. He resubmitted the film on Wednesday for the ratings board to view again with "three seconds" trimmed. "We had no choice but to go for an R rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2004 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
The NC-17 rating, long seen as the kiss of death for a movie, is suddenly coming to life. Three NC-17 films have emerged since the first of the year. Bernardo Bertolucci's "The Dreamers" came out in February, while "Young Adam," starring Ewan McGregor and Tilda Swinton, premiered on Friday. And "High Tension," a French horror film, is due out from Lions Gate Films in the fall.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to complaints of undue censorship from movie makers and film critics, the Motion Picture Assn. of America abolished its X movie rating on Wednesday and replaced it with a new adults-only classification. The MPAA, in a joint announcement with the powerful National Assn. of Theater Owners, said the X rating would be replaced immediately with a designation of NC-17, which indicates that no children under 17 can be admitted.
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