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Movie Remakes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William "Bill" Allyn, television and motion picture producer of such successful film remakes as "Cousins" and "Rich and Famous," has died. He was 71. Allyn, who began his career as an actor, died Sunday in Los Angeles of complications of heart disease, according to his publicist, Stan Rosenfield. Born in New York and educated at the University of Texas and Yale Drama School, Allyn landed his first role as a teenager--appearing on Broadway with Marlon Brando in "A Flag Is Born."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Steven Spielberg has found his next project in the past. Hollywood's most famous filmmaker will direct a remake of the 1950 movie "Harvey," which starred Jimmy Stewart as an eccentric who claims to be friends with an invisible 6-foot rabbit. It was based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning 1944 play by Mary Chase. Spielberg is finishing work on the first of a new series of movies based on the Belgian comic strip "Tintin," which are being co-financed by Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002 | Kevin Maynard, Special to the Times
There are no new stories, goes the Hollywood adage. Joseph Campbell laid out a finite series of archetypes; Shakespeare stole from his predecessors and contemporaries. But this month, the studios have counted on audiences to become complete amnesiacs with six movie remakes. While some critics carped, moviegoers haven't seemed to mind that "Red Dragon," the prequel to "The Silence of the Lambs" by Thomas Harris, had been filmed previously (by Michael Mann as "Manhunter" in 1986).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Hollywood has been mining Asian movies for ideas for years, but now an American studio is remaking one of its home productions as a Chinese-language movie with local partners. Warner China Film HG -- a joint venture between Warner Bros. and China's state-run China Film Group and Hengdian Group -- is releasing "Connected" on Sept. 25, remaking the 2004 New Line Cinema thriller "Cellular," starring Kim Basinger. "Connected" changes the setting to Hong Kong and switches the cast to Chinese-speaking actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a good bet that steel magnate Andrew Carnegie never anticipated that whales would fly in the famous concert hall named for him, nor a pink flamingo play yo-yo. But after a reminiscence from Roy Disney--"It was over 60 years ago that I first heard my Uncle Walt talk about his vision"--a packed house here even saw another era's most well-known Donald, the quacking one, help save the world on Noah's Ark. The longest delayed movie sequel on record finally had its premiere.
SPORTS
December 2, 2001 | Mike Penner
Maybe I missed something amid the five Emmy Award acceptance speeches, or the audible sobbing of grown men in front of their televisions, or the jet-fuel ignition of two young acting careers heading for higher altitude. Because after the country took its first look at "Brian's Song," in its original incarnation 30 years ago, I don't recall anyone saying, "How about a do-over?" What, Billy Dee Williams as Gale Sayers didn't quite nail that speech at the awards banquet?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The creative team behind PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre" presentation of "Doctor Zhivago" wasn't worried so much about living up to Boris Pasternak's epic novel; the challenge for the two-part, four-hour adaptation that premieres tonight was overcoming memories of David Lean's Oscar-winning 1965 film classic. So they went back to the Russian author's romantic novel in their attempt to create a "Zhivago" that was closer in spirit and tone to the source material.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
The old saw about undistinguished books making the best movie adaptations might easily be applied to the current vogue for remaking pictures as well. Though perhaps it is better to say "less well-known," such as the case with 1965's "The Flight of the Phoenix," a film that few would label a mint-condition classic but is nevertheless a solid and engaging drama about a group of plane crash survivors struggling to survive in the desert.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Filming has started in Germany's historic Babelsberg studios outside Berlin on a new version of Jules Verne's "Around the World in 80 Days." The movie, starring Jim Broadbent, Jackie Chan and Kathy Bates, is being directed by Frank Coraci ("The Waterboy"). It's the first large-scale Hollywood production to be shot at the studio, and with costs running around $100 million, it's estimated to be one of the most expensive films ever made in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sports radio remains pretty much without peer in the media world's overflowing yahoo department, an arena where the importance of loudly having an opinion far exceeds possessing actual knowledge. Still, it was hard not to nod along a few weeks ago listening as two of Fox Sports' resident Neanderthals voiced outrage over ABC's plans to remake "Brian's Song."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"I Am Legend," which opens Friday, is the third official adaptation -- there's also a made-for-DVD poseur -- of Richard Matheson's seminal 1954 novel of the same name. Here's a look at the three previous versions: (1964) Released the same year as the apocalyptic "Fail Safe" and "Dr. Strangelove," this low-budget Italian production features the great Vincent Price in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
To a screenwriter, time can feel like either a bullet train speeding toward deadlines or a long ride through a barren expanse of desert. When the western remake "3:10 to Yuma" chugs into theaters in two weeks, its screenplay credits will include a name -- Halsted Welles -- that has spent half a century riding its crooked rails.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The producer of the "Bourne" movie trilogy said Thursday he plans to remake a Jackie Chan-produced action comedy about a gay man who runs a mob, in Hollywood's latest of several adaptations of Hong Kong films. Andrew Tennenbaum said in an e-mail that his company, Flashpoint Entertainment, has bought the remake rights to "Enter the Phoenix" from Chan's JCE Movies. Tennenbaum and Solon So, a spokesman for Chan, declined to say how much the deal is worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos and Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writers
WHAT happened to the pastel hues, the Armani suits, the sockless shoes? What about the propulsive, tropical theme music of Jan Hammer, and even the alligator? Michael Mann's "Miami Vice," which opens today, borrows its title and buddy-cops-in-Miami premise from one of the most universally recognized TV shows yet leaves out many of the elements that helped make the 1980s TV series a hit. Which poses the question: If you take the "Miami Vice" out of "Miami Vice," will the masses want to see it?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | SUSAN KING
MAGGIE GRACE sees a pattern emerging in her young career. For most of the year, her home base is Honolulu, the location for ABC's popular, Emmy-nominated series "Lost," in which she plays the rich, snobby plane crash survivor Shannon. But even before Grace completed the series' first season, she was commuting to yet another island -- this one off the coast of Vancouver, Canada -- for her role in the remake of the 1980 John Carpenter horror classic "The Fog."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In order to enjoy a movie like, say, "Charlie's Angels" or "Starsky & Hutch" as nature and Hollywood intended, a viewer needs to be both simultaneously steeped in and ironically removed from trash and celebrity culture. That is, he or she must be able to appreciate that Snoop Dogg is Huggy and not mind that Huggy is Snoop Dogg all at the same time. (This isn't nearly as hard as it sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In order to enjoy a movie like, say, "Charlie's Angels" or "Starsky & Hutch" as nature and Hollywood intended, a viewer needs to be both simultaneously steeped in and ironically removed from trash and celebrity culture. That is, he or she must be able to appreciate that Snoop Dogg is Huggy and not mind that Huggy is Snoop Dogg all at the same time. (This isn't nearly as hard as it sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2001 | CHRIS KALTENBACH, BALTIMORE SUN
When "Planet of the Apes" opened--and I'm talking about the 1968 original, not Tim Burton's ham-fisted, self-absorbed remake--I remember dashing to the theater, so anxious was I to see this movie that promised a whole planet full of non-human talking primates. And when the movie was over, I remember thinking it was about the coolest thing I'd ever seen. Three decades later, I decided the time was right to reacquaint myself with that sci-fi classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2005 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
As a very young actor, Kevin Rodney Sullivan played a school-age extra in Sidney Poitier's 1970 crime drama "They Call Me Mister Tibbs!" It was Sullivan's first paying role as a film actor, and a fleeting part at that, yet it marked the beginning of Poitier's long influence over Sullivan's career. Sullivan counts Poitier's groundbreaking "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" as one of his inspirations for pursuing a Hollywood career.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
The old saw about undistinguished books making the best movie adaptations might easily be applied to the current vogue for remaking pictures as well. Though perhaps it is better to say "less well-known," such as the case with 1965's "The Flight of the Phoenix," a film that few would label a mint-condition classic but is nevertheless a solid and engaging drama about a group of plane crash survivors struggling to survive in the desert.
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