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Movie Remakes

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January 8, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William "Bill" Allyn, television and motion picture producer of such successful film remakes as "Cousins" and "Rich and Famous," has died. He was 71. Allyn, who began his career as an actor, died Sunday in Los Angeles of complications of heart disease, according to his publicist, Stan Rosenfield. Born in New York and educated at the University of Texas and Yale Drama School, Allyn landed his first role as a teenager--appearing on Broadway with Marlon Brando in "A Flag Is Born."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010 | Steven Zeitchik
Hollywood is once again off to see the wizard. In fact, it may make several trips. As Tim Burton's interpretation of "Alice in Wonderland" continues to attract audiences, film-world power brokers are looking to jump-start a number of remakes of "The Wizard of Oz" -- a close adaptation of the original novel, a prequel about the wizard and a darker tale about Dorothy's granddaughter in Oz. Two of the three are, like "Alice," stories about...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, Kathleen Craughwell is a Times staff writer
Make no mistake about it; Joe is the star of this show. Oh sure, that's "Titanic" star Bill Paxton who's wheeling around the set in a golf cart. And yes, that's up-and-coming actress Charlize Theron ("Devil's Advocate") hanging out at the crafts service table cracking Elvis jokes with crew members. But it's Joe, or "Big Joe" as he's known around the set, who gets all the attention between takes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Steven Spielberg has found his next project in the past. Hollywood's most famous filmmaker will direct a remake of the 1950 movie "Harvey," which starred Jimmy Stewart as an eccentric who claims to be friends with an invisible 6-foot rabbit. It was based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning 1944 play by Mary Chase. Spielberg is finishing work on the first of a new series of movies based on the Belgian comic strip "Tintin," which are being co-financed by Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002 | Kevin Maynard, Special to the Times
There are no new stories, goes the Hollywood adage. Joseph Campbell laid out a finite series of archetypes; Shakespeare stole from his predecessors and contemporaries. But this month, the studios have counted on audiences to become complete amnesiacs with six movie remakes. While some critics carped, moviegoers haven't seemed to mind that "Red Dragon," the prequel to "The Silence of the Lambs" by Thomas Harris, had been filmed previously (by Michael Mann as "Manhunter" in 1986).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Everyone knows that there's often less than six degrees of separation among most celebrities in Hollywood, but if you ever wanted to stump your film-buff friends with a great trivia question, just try this one on for size: What do writer-director Frank Darabont ("The Shawshank Redemption"), Johnny Depp, Peter Jackson, Iggy Pop, writer-director Brian Helgeland ("L.A. Confidential"), Hollywood novelist Bruce Wagner, director Chuck Russell ("The Mask") and producer Michael De Luca have in common?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a good bet that steel magnate Andrew Carnegie never anticipated that whales would fly in the famous concert hall named for him, nor a pink flamingo play yo-yo. But after a reminiscence from Roy Disney--"It was over 60 years ago that I first heard my Uncle Walt talk about his vision"--a packed house here even saw another era's most well-known Donald, the quacking one, help save the world on Noah's Ark. The longest delayed movie sequel on record finally had its premiere.
SPORTS
December 2, 2001 | Mike Penner
Maybe I missed something amid the five Emmy Award acceptance speeches, or the audible sobbing of grown men in front of their televisions, or the jet-fuel ignition of two young acting careers heading for higher altitude. Because after the country took its first look at "Brian's Song," in its original incarnation 30 years ago, I don't recall anyone saying, "How about a do-over?" What, Billy Dee Williams as Gale Sayers didn't quite nail that speech at the awards banquet?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Stephen Farber, Special to The Times
In a business where imitation trumps originality, remakes rule. Desperate producers have regularly raided the vaults in a most-often futile effort to seize a sure thing. There have been multiple versions of "Mutiny on the Bounty," "The Prisoner of Zenda" and "King Solomon's Mines," to name just a few. But the coming months will see the largest number of high-profile remakes ever to hit theaters in one concentrated period.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | John Horn
"The Heartbreak Kid's" meager opening (it grossed just $14 million, not even winning the weekend) wasn't the kind of bellwether Hollywood was looking for. Over the next several months, the studios will flood the multiplex with a dozen other prominent (and often pricey) remakes. The thinking behind the remake is pretty straightforward, but the fact is, remakes are far from a sure thing. For every "3:10 to Yuma" hit remake, there's an "All the King's Men" dud.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Everyone knows that there's often less than six degrees of separation among most celebrities in Hollywood, but if you ever wanted to stump your film-buff friends with a great trivia question, just try this one on for size: What do writer-director Frank Darabont ("The Shawshank Redemption"), Johnny Depp, Peter Jackson, Iggy Pop, writer-director Brian Helgeland ("L.A. Confidential"), Hollywood novelist Bruce Wagner, director Chuck Russell ("The Mask") and producer Michael De Luca have in common?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Hollywood has been mining Asian movies for ideas for years, but now an American studio is remaking one of its home productions as a Chinese-language movie with local partners. Warner China Film HG -- a joint venture between Warner Bros. and China's state-run China Film Group and Hengdian Group -- is releasing "Connected" on Sept. 25, remaking the 2004 New Line Cinema thriller "Cellular," starring Kim Basinger. "Connected" changes the setting to Hong Kong and switches the cast to Chinese-speaking actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"I Am Legend," which opens Friday, is the third official adaptation -- there's also a made-for-DVD poseur -- of Richard Matheson's seminal 1954 novel of the same name. Here's a look at the three previous versions: (1964) Released the same year as the apocalyptic "Fail Safe" and "Dr. Strangelove," this low-budget Italian production features the great Vincent Price in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | John Horn
"The Heartbreak Kid's" meager opening (it grossed just $14 million, not even winning the weekend) wasn't the kind of bellwether Hollywood was looking for. Over the next several months, the studios will flood the multiplex with a dozen other prominent (and often pricey) remakes. The thinking behind the remake is pretty straightforward, but the fact is, remakes are far from a sure thing. For every "3:10 to Yuma" hit remake, there's an "All the King's Men" dud.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
To a screenwriter, time can feel like either a bullet train speeding toward deadlines or a long ride through a barren expanse of desert. When the western remake "3:10 to Yuma" chugs into theaters in two weeks, its screenplay credits will include a name -- Halsted Welles -- that has spent half a century riding its crooked rails.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The producer of the "Bourne" movie trilogy said Thursday he plans to remake a Jackie Chan-produced action comedy about a gay man who runs a mob, in Hollywood's latest of several adaptations of Hong Kong films. Andrew Tennenbaum said in an e-mail that his company, Flashpoint Entertainment, has bought the remake rights to "Enter the Phoenix" from Chan's JCE Movies. Tennenbaum and Solon So, a spokesman for Chan, declined to say how much the deal is worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gus Van Sant's shot-by-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" opened Friday in theaters. But don't look for the original 1960 classic to pop up any time soon on the small screen. Wanting to avoid comparisons to the original, which starred Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh, Universal Studios has put Hitchcock's masterpiece on hiatus from television until some time next year so that Van Sant's remake can be judged on its own merits.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The creative team behind PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre" presentation of "Doctor Zhivago" wasn't worried so much about living up to Boris Pasternak's epic novel; the challenge for the two-part, four-hour adaptation that premieres tonight was overcoming memories of David Lean's Oscar-winning 1965 film classic. So they went back to the Russian author's romantic novel in their attempt to create a "Zhivago" that was closer in spirit and tone to the source material.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos and Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writers
WHAT happened to the pastel hues, the Armani suits, the sockless shoes? What about the propulsive, tropical theme music of Jan Hammer, and even the alligator? Michael Mann's "Miami Vice," which opens today, borrows its title and buddy-cops-in-Miami premise from one of the most universally recognized TV shows yet leaves out many of the elements that helped make the 1980s TV series a hit. Which poses the question: If you take the "Miami Vice" out of "Miami Vice," will the masses want to see it?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | SUSAN KING
MAGGIE GRACE sees a pattern emerging in her young career. For most of the year, her home base is Honolulu, the location for ABC's popular, Emmy-nominated series "Lost," in which she plays the rich, snobby plane crash survivor Shannon. But even before Grace completed the series' first season, she was commuting to yet another island -- this one off the coast of Vancouver, Canada -- for her role in the remake of the 1980 John Carpenter horror classic "The Fog."
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