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Movie Sequels

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1989 | DENNIS BROWN
Despite the current glut of movie sequels, they're hardly new. In 1939, the same year MGM distributed "Gone With the Wind," the studio also released its third "Thin Man," its second and third "Dr. Kildares," and its seventh, eighth and ninth "Andy Hardys." Yet, for half a century, "GWTW"--the most successful movie of all time, based on the most popular American novel (more than 25 million copies sold since 1936)--has eluded sequelization. But that may change.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The burgeoning "Lego Movie" franchise has a new master builder: Chris McKay, who served as animation co-director on the first film. McKay has been hired to direct the 2017 sequel, according to a Deadline Hollywood report , taking the reins from "Lego Movie" directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller. A Chicago native, McKay got his start in TV animation, winning an Emmy for his work on Cartoon Network's "Robot Chicken. " He also worked on the Adult Swim series "Titan Maximum. " The "Lego" sequel will mark his first studio film as a director.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1997
Harvey Entertainment Co. announced that it expects to return to profitability in the second quarter this year as a result of an agreement with Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment to produce a motion picture sequel to "Casper." The Universal City-based company also predicted it would post profits in its third and fourth quarters from the upcoming release of its direct-to-video feature "Casper, A Spirited Beginning," which will be distributed by Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The first movie was made for about $60 million and came out this month. There's no budget yet for “The Lego Movie” sequel, but Warner Bros. certainly has big ideas for the date. The studio has scheduled the follow-up to the building-block blockbuster for May 26, 2017, a prime Memorial Day slot that Hollywood typically uses for its highest-profile  fare. The comedic screenwriters Jared Stern (“The Internship”) and Michelle Morgan (“Girl Most Likely) are on board to write the new movie, with no director hired as yet. There is ample precedent for a first-quarter release getting a spring-summer or holiday sequel; “The Hunger Games” came out in March but its sequel, “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” was elevated to November.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
It seems that the "Honey, I . . ." movies are fast becoming a series. No sooner has "Honey, I Blew Up the Kid" opened than a third installment is in the works from the Walt Disney Co. After shrinking the Szalinski kids in the first film and blowing up baby in the current one, sources say the latest twist will be to shrink the parents--who'll then watch in (mock) horror as their kids get the run of the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Literary agent Mort Janklow was in his office here last week when the call came from a familiar voice: "It's finished, Mort," the caller said, "and it's going to be in your office tomorrow."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Hell hath no fury like an actor scorned. Anyone who's talked to Terrence Howard recently knows that the actor is still fighting mad six months after being replaced in the upcoming "Iron Man 2." "It was a very, very bad choice," fumed Howard, who played Iron Man's Army buddy Lt. Col. James "Rhodey" Rhodes in the first film, to Parade magazine about Marvel Studios' decision to reboot the part with Don Cheadle in the role. "You don't make $800 million and then try and shake everyone down.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1989 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Synchronize your watches," proclaims the massive billboard hovering over the Sunset Strip, keeping a vigil on the number of hours, minutes and seconds remaining until the release of "Back to the Future Part II," a follow-up to the top-grossing film of 1985. Similar billboards have been counting down in Universal City and in New York City's Times Square. There is no name identification. Just the familiar image of Michael J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Despite its status as a world leader in social equality, Sweden clings to a racial and class hierarchy in which one-percenter bankers profit from drug deals and bloodshed at the lower rungs of society - at least that was the critique that made the 2012 thriller "Easy Money" such a stylish and indignant affair. Striving business student J.W. (Joel Kinnaman) ricocheted between the jet-setting "aristos" and the criminal underclass to engineer a money-laundering scheme. The new "Easy Money: Hard to Kill" picks up a few years after the events of the original film.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the biggest licensing deal ever tied to a single entertainment property, Hasbro Inc. and Galoob Toys Inc. announced Tuesday that they had separately reached agreements with Lucasfilm Ltd. for licensing rights to the next three "Star Wars" movies. The companies are giving Lucasfilm combined stock worth more than $225 million, in addition to royalties that should far exceed that amount. The films are expected to reach theaters beginning in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Despite its status as a world leader in social equality, Sweden clings to a racial and class hierarchy in which one-percenter bankers profit from drug deals and bloodshed at the lower rungs of society - at least that was the critique that made the 2012 thriller "Easy Money" such a stylish and indignant affair. Striving business student J.W. (Joel Kinnaman) ricocheted between the jet-setting "aristos" and the criminal underclass to engineer a money-laundering scheme. The new "Easy Money: Hard to Kill" picks up a few years after the events of the original film.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
If the film business is akin to playing poker, two Hollywood studios are making bets on a hand they haven't yet been dealt. Lionsgate and Sony Pictures have announced release dates for sequels to "The Hunger Games" and "The Amazing Spider-Man," two highly anticipated movies that will be released in March and July 2012, respectively. "Hunger Games" sequel "Catching Fire" has been scheduled for November 2013, while the sequel to the "Spider-Man" reboot will hit theaters in May 2014.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Bob and Harvey Weinstein are back in business with Miramax Films. The independent film-mogul brothers, who this year lost out on a bid to buy back from Walt Disney Co. the specialty label they founded, have signed a deal to partner with the new owners of Miramax to produce sequels and spin-offs to 10 movies that they made in the 1990s and early 2000s. Initially, Weinstein Co. expects to produce new installments of the Oscar-winning romantic comedy "Shakespeare in Love," the dark comedy "Bad Santa" and the 2005 remake of "The Amityville Horror.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood is obsessed with producing reboots and sequels to its hit movies. But Walt Disney Co. is trying something more audacious this week ? releasing a sequel to a 1982 sci-fi fantasy film that was a box office disappointment and that most of today's moviegoers have never seen. On Friday, "Tron: Legacy" will arrive in theaters as one of most intensely marketed films of 2010, but it represents an investment that goes well beyond the box office. The movie sits at the center of a massive multiplatform push with high stakes for Disney, which is counting on the mercury-glow of the film to light up toy and apparel sales, spark purchases of related video games and lure viewers to an upcoming animated series on cable television.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2010
Perry wedded to success Tyler Perry is doing just fine without 3-D, thank you. The writer, director and producer's latest effort, "Why Did I Get Married Too?," took in a most impressive $30.1 million in its first weekend. The sequel to his 2007 hit "Why Did I Get Married?" not only beat the opening of that movie by almost $10 million, but it was also Perry's biggest start for a movie that didn't feature his Madea character. With nine hits in the last five years, none of this should come as a surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and John Horn
Peter Parker can catch all sorts of villains in his webs, but the one thing Spider-Man couldn't bring to Sony Pictures was a workable script -- and budget -- for the $2.5-billion franchise's fourth installment, derailing one of the most lucrative movie series in Hollywood history. Less than a week after the studio said it was postponing production on the fourth web-slinger movie over story problems, Sony on Monday pulled the plug on the project as it was being conceived with director Sam Raimi after he told the studio he wasn't comfortable moving forward with the sequel, originally scheduled for release in May 2011.
OPINION
July 20, 2003
Sequels are swell things. Humans love them. How many wars have we had to end wars? But we return to the premise of armed conflict over and over again. So excuse our midsummer suspicions when movie studio execs start wringing their hands and moaning over the "failure" of certain movie sequels this summer. Sounds like rehearsal for a tax audit meeting. Let's examine the alleged problem: Just because the public has fallen for -- what?
MAGAZINE
May 27, 1990
At $70 million-plus, "Total Recall" may very well be the summer's most expensive spectacle, but with Arnold Schwarzenegger in it, Tri-Star feels it's money well spent. Warners' "Gremlins 2: The New Batch" and Buena Vista's "Dick Tracy" also have been reported in the $50-million range, though their respective studios claim $30 million apiece. "Back to the Future III" and "Die Hard 2" both carry $60-million price tags.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
Halloween's fans are legion, so its no wonder that local theaters can't wait until the 31st to celebrate the ghoulish holiday. On Sunday and Monday, the venerable New Beverly will show "Spine Tingler!," an excellent biopic on legendary horror-meister William Castle. And on Saturday, the historic Alex Theatre in Glendale will do more than just screen the 1963 classic "The Haunting," starring Claire Bloom and Julie Harris, at both 2 and 8 p.m. Before each screening, it will present Michael J. Kouri, described as the theater's "resident psychic medium," to talk about the place's haunted history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If there were ever a movie that shouldn't end up making as much as $190 million around the world, it is "The Final Destination," a homely horror thriller that is the fourth and least-loved film in New Line's low-budget "Final Destination" horror franchise. The first three movies, released from 2000 to 2006, were modest successes, each one earning around $50 million in the U.S. and only slightly more overseas. It's a sign of the franchise's below-the-radar consistency that "FD3," released in 2006, had virtually the same exact box-office numbers as the original film, earning $54 million domestically and $58.7 million overseas.
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