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Movie Sound Tracks

ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, be honest. Is composer-keyboardist Kitaro the first name that would come to mind as the source of music for Oliver Stone's latest Vietnam war film, "Heaven and Earth"? The same Kitaro who has been described by the Encyclopedia Britannica as "the quintessential musician of the New Age"? Who has produced nearly 20 recordings of misty-sounding, impressionistic music to float by?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992
Holiday shoppers last week bought 443,000 copies of Whitney Houston's single, "I Will Always Love You," and 575,000 copies of her "Bodyguard" soundtrack album, which means the singer-actress will keep a firm grip on the No. 1 position of both the nation's pop single and album sales charts when Billboard magazine hits the newsstands Saturday. The sales make Houston's single the highest weekly seller since Billboard switched to a computerized sales tabulation system in 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
The oeuvre of Steven Seagal is ever-expanding. In between shooting action-adventure movies--his latest is "Under Siege"--the martial-arts-expert-turned-actor has turned his passions to music: He's the executive producer of "Music From the Films of Steven Seagal." For $12.95 (the CD) or $8.98 (the tape), the kind of hard, kick-boxing music that pumps up audiences in the theaters can be heard on 18 tracks from the "Above the Law," "Hard to Kill" and "Out for Justice" movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after songwriters Richard and Robert Sherman won two of the six Academy Awards that went to the 1964 Disney classic "Mary Poppins," they bounced gratefully over to Walt Disney's office, Oscars in hand. His typically restrained response was, said Robert Sherman: "The bases were loaded, we hit a home run and that's great. From now on, just try to get on base." "Walt was very feeling," Richard Sherman said, "but he didn't show his emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A little 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? " Wayne asks his friends at the start of a memorable car scene in "Wayne's World," the top-grossing film released so far this year. "Excellent choice," declares Garth, as the cruising young hard-rock archetypes start their head-banging mime to the operatic Queen song. Many pop music fans agree the choice was excellent, which is why the 1975 record is having a phenomenal second life--five months after Queen singer Freddie Mercury died of AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How's this for a show-biz marketing riddle: How will Columbia Records get paid for 100,000 to 300,000 copies of its new "Gladiator" soundtrack without selling a single one? The answer says a lot about Hollywood's increasingly high-stakes marketing climate. In an experiment designed to boost its opening weekend blitz for "Gladiator," a new street-boxing drama, Columbia Pictures is giving away free copies of the soundtrack to fans who see the film today, its first day in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992 | ALAN LIGHT, Alan Light is an associate editor at Rolling Stone.
As the chief sonic architect for Public Enemy, rap's visionary radicals, Hank Shocklee has made some of the angriest sounding music ever in the pop world. The dense, tumultuous tracks that he constructs with the group mirror the tension and fury reflected in such album titles as "Fear of a Black Planet" and "Apocalypse 91 . . . the Enemy Strikes Black." Now Shocklee has applied the same aesthetics to the film world.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks since their career was launched on film, the Commitments--a group of musicians brought together for the film of the same name--have enjoyed the kind of success that most real bands only dream of. Their album reached a respectable No. 8 on the Billboard pop chart and has spawned a series of follow-up projects. Band members have performed at a glitzy benefit concert and gone club-hopping with rock's royalty, somehow stepping off screen and into real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no business like show business, syndicated radio producer Ron Cutler kept telling himself. So wouldn't it be loverly for people to have a radio station they could turn to and hear only tunes from their favorite Broadway and movie musicals? Rather than look somewhere over the rainbow to realize his idea, Cutler turned to one of his favorite cities: Santa Barbara.
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