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Movie Sound Tracks

ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1996 | CHEO HODARI COKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Build it, and they will come." That's the unspoken mantra chanted by many Hollywood soundtrack directors, looking to construct their own musical "Field of Dreams" from a marketing and sales standpoint. They mash as many top-selling acts onto a soundtrack as the budget allows, even if the artists or songs have nothing to do with the emotional fabric of the film. The goal: a home run, i.e., going multi-platinum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1996 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic
Even now, two decades after it first appeared, the image remains one of the most arresting openings in modern American film: A yellow Checker cab, massive, unyielding, sinister, pushes its way through a cloud of subterranean New York City steam. From frame one all the way to the end, "Taxi Driver" was a film that never doubted it was going to make an impression.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an episode of the old "Batman" TV series, a villain ties Robin to the clapper of a giant clock bell. When the clock is to toll at midnight, the gonging is supposed to spell a particularly gruesome auditory doom for the Boy Wonder. Not to suggest that the makers of "Batman Forever" have plotted the same fate for moviegoers, but if you see and hear the movie in the right theater, the experience can be akin to hanging out in that bell with the Caped Crusader's hapless sidekick.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny Bay Area company claims that five major movie studios, including Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. and Warner Bros., are probably infringing on two patents it holds for a digital sound technology used on such motion pictures as "Forrest Gump," "The Lion King" and "The Fugitive." But instead of battling the movie studio Goliaths in court, this David is hoping to sell the rights to the patents and let somebody else shoulder the enormous costs of litigating the dispute with the studios.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sony Corp. scored a victory in the digital movie soundtrack wars Wednesday by signing an estimated $25-million deal to install its Sony Dynamic Digital Sound system in AMC Entertainment theaters. The agreement calls for AMC to purchase 1,700 SDDS digital film playback units for exclusive use in its theaters. The Kansas City, Mo.-based chain has 1,618 screens, with roughly 400 more planned or under construction.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Digital Theater Systems is close to resolving a legal dispute with a French rival, a step that will free the company to turn its attention to Sony Corp., its latest major challenger in the competition to bring digital sound to movie theaters. DTS, based in Westlake Village, will purchase worldwide rights to the digital sound patent of L.C. Concept of Paris under an agreement expected to be signed within a week.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Digital Theater Systems is close to resolving its legal dispute with French rival L.C. Concept, thus freeing the company to turn its attention to Sony Corp., its latest major rival in the competitive digital soundtrack movie theater wars. DTS, which is based in Westlake Village, will purchase worldwide rights to the digital sound patent of L.C. Concept of Paris, through an agreement expected to be signed within a week. Sources place the settlement in the $2.6-million range.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the frantic final weeks of post-production on "I Love Trouble," director Charles Shyer and actor Nick Nolte got together on sound stages nearly 6,000 miles apart for the latest in Hollywood technology--the transcontinental sound-dubbing session. A scene from the movie simultaneously flickered on screens at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, where Shyer was directing, and a sound stage in Paris, where Nolte was based.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
How do you cram three decades of classic pop-rock into a single CD? You don't--as the team behind the soundtrack for the highly touted new Tom Hanks movie, "Forrest Gump," discovered.
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