Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMovie Sound Tracks
IN THE NEWS

Movie Sound Tracks

BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Digital Theater Systems is close to resolving its legal dispute with French rival L.C. Concept, thus freeing the company to turn its attention to Sony Corp., its latest major rival in the competitive digital soundtrack movie theater wars. DTS, which is based in Westlake Village, will purchase worldwide rights to the digital sound patent of L.C. Concept of Paris, through an agreement expected to be signed within a week. Sources place the settlement in the $2.6-million range.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the frantic final weeks of post-production on "I Love Trouble," director Charles Shyer and actor Nick Nolte got together on sound stages nearly 6,000 miles apart for the latest in Hollywood technology--the transcontinental sound-dubbing session. A scene from the movie simultaneously flickered on screens at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, where Shyer was directing, and a sound stage in Paris, where Nolte was based.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
How do you cram three decades of classic pop-rock into a single CD? You don't--as the team behind the soundtrack for the highly touted new Tom Hanks movie, "Forrest Gump," discovered.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pressed to pick his favorite Ennio Morricone score, Warren Beatty hems and haws. But he doesn't hedge too politically long in naming Morricone his favorite scorer. "There isn't much that he's done that I haven't really loved," says Beatty, who recently hired Morricone to do the music for "Love Affair," his next production. "I always felt there's nobody better than Ennio to create a haunting theme. And I think he has as thorough an understanding of movies as any composer in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN, Steve Hochman writes about pop music for Calendar
Three years ago, if Roy Disney whistled while he worked, it probably wasn't an Elton John tune. "I wouldn't call myself a fan," says the vice chairman of the huge corporate entity that bears his uncle's name--and the "unofficial chairman" of the animation world that is the heart of the Walt Disney legacy. "We joke a lot that my knowledge of popular music stopped when Glenn Miller stopped recording," he adds. "At least that's what my kids tell me."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, be honest. Is composer-keyboardist Kitaro the first name that would come to mind as the source of music for Oliver Stone's latest Vietnam war film, "Heaven and Earth"? The same Kitaro who has been described by the Encyclopedia Britannica as "the quintessential musician of the New Age"? Who has produced nearly 20 recordings of misty-sounding, impressionistic music to float by?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992
Holiday shoppers last week bought 443,000 copies of Whitney Houston's single, "I Will Always Love You," and 575,000 copies of her "Bodyguard" soundtrack album, which means the singer-actress will keep a firm grip on the No. 1 position of both the nation's pop single and album sales charts when Billboard magazine hits the newsstands Saturday. The sales make Houston's single the highest weekly seller since Billboard switched to a computerized sales tabulation system in 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
The oeuvre of Steven Seagal is ever-expanding. In between shooting action-adventure movies--his latest is "Under Siege"--the martial-arts-expert-turned-actor has turned his passions to music: He's the executive producer of "Music From the Films of Steven Seagal." For $12.95 (the CD) or $8.98 (the tape), the kind of hard, kick-boxing music that pumps up audiences in the theaters can be heard on 18 tracks from the "Above the Law," "Hard to Kill" and "Out for Justice" movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after songwriters Richard and Robert Sherman won two of the six Academy Awards that went to the 1964 Disney classic "Mary Poppins," they bounced gratefully over to Walt Disney's office, Oscars in hand. His typically restrained response was, said Robert Sherman: "The bases were loaded, we hit a home run and that's great. From now on, just try to get on base." "Walt was very feeling," Richard Sherman said, "but he didn't show his emotions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|