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Movie Sound Tracks

ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
How do you cram three decades of classic pop-rock into a single CD? You don't--as the team behind the soundtrack for the highly touted new Tom Hanks movie, "Forrest Gump," discovered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pressed to pick his favorite Ennio Morricone score, Warren Beatty hems and haws. But he doesn't hedge too politically long in naming Morricone his favorite scorer. "There isn't much that he's done that I haven't really loved," says Beatty, who recently hired Morricone to do the music for "Love Affair," his next production. "I always felt there's nobody better than Ennio to create a haunting theme. And I think he has as thorough an understanding of movies as any composer in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN, Steve Hochman writes about pop music for Calendar
Three years ago, if Roy Disney whistled while he worked, it probably wasn't an Elton John tune. "I wouldn't call myself a fan," says the vice chairman of the huge corporate entity that bears his uncle's name--and the "unofficial chairman" of the animation world that is the heart of the Walt Disney legacy. "We joke a lot that my knowledge of popular music stopped when Glenn Miller stopped recording," he adds. "At least that's what my kids tell me."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, be honest. Is composer-keyboardist Kitaro the first name that would come to mind as the source of music for Oliver Stone's latest Vietnam war film, "Heaven and Earth"? The same Kitaro who has been described by the Encyclopedia Britannica as "the quintessential musician of the New Age"? Who has produced nearly 20 recordings of misty-sounding, impressionistic music to float by?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1992
Holiday shoppers last week bought 443,000 copies of Whitney Houston's single, "I Will Always Love You," and 575,000 copies of her "Bodyguard" soundtrack album, which means the singer-actress will keep a firm grip on the No. 1 position of both the nation's pop single and album sales charts when Billboard magazine hits the newsstands Saturday. The sales make Houston's single the highest weekly seller since Billboard switched to a computerized sales tabulation system in 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
The oeuvre of Steven Seagal is ever-expanding. In between shooting action-adventure movies--his latest is "Under Siege"--the martial-arts-expert-turned-actor has turned his passions to music: He's the executive producer of "Music From the Films of Steven Seagal." For $12.95 (the CD) or $8.98 (the tape), the kind of hard, kick-boxing music that pumps up audiences in the theaters can be heard on 18 tracks from the "Above the Law," "Hard to Kill" and "Out for Justice" movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after songwriters Richard and Robert Sherman won two of the six Academy Awards that went to the 1964 Disney classic "Mary Poppins," they bounced gratefully over to Walt Disney's office, Oscars in hand. His typically restrained response was, said Robert Sherman: "The bases were loaded, we hit a home run and that's great. From now on, just try to get on base." "Walt was very feeling," Richard Sherman said, "but he didn't show his emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A little 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? " Wayne asks his friends at the start of a memorable car scene in "Wayne's World," the top-grossing film released so far this year. "Excellent choice," declares Garth, as the cruising young hard-rock archetypes start their head-banging mime to the operatic Queen song. Many pop music fans agree the choice was excellent, which is why the 1975 record is having a phenomenal second life--five months after Queen singer Freddie Mercury died of AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1992 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How's this for a show-biz marketing riddle: How will Columbia Records get paid for 100,000 to 300,000 copies of its new "Gladiator" soundtrack without selling a single one? The answer says a lot about Hollywood's increasingly high-stakes marketing climate. In an experiment designed to boost its opening weekend blitz for "Gladiator," a new street-boxing drama, Columbia Pictures is giving away free copies of the soundtrack to fans who see the film today, its first day in theaters.
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