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Movie Sound Tracks

ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2000 | JORDAN RAPHAEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in April, when Maverick Records executive Russ Rieger picked a then-unknown recording called "Who Let the Dogs Out" for use in the soundtrack of a new "Rugrats" movie, he couldn't have known how big the catchy barking-and-rap tune would get before the album's release today. But Rieger did know one thing: "It was magic." Magic indeed. How else to explain the song's exploding popularity as a kids' TV favorite, a pop radio mainstay and a booming sports anthem?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Around 1895, Thomas Edison's talented assistant, William Dickson, made movie history in West Orange, N.J., when he successfully recorded sound and moving image in synchronization for the first time. Since the test was never intended for commercial distribution and never copyrighted, it has no formal title. Still, it is well-known to film historians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For nearly 30 years, Walter Murch has advanced the art of sound in film by challenging and enriching the filmgoing experience. In particular, his contributions to "American Graffiti" (1973), "The Conversation" (1974), "Apocalypse Now" (1979) and "The English Patient" (1996) expand our awareness of sound in exciting ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2000 | JON BURLINGAME, Jon Burlingame is a regular contributor to Calendar
Last month on the Newman Scoring Stage at 20th Century Fox, 90 Los Angeles musicians were performing nearly flawlessly, after a single read-through, newly written music for a big summer movie. On this day, it happened to be Michael Kamen's driving score for "X-Men."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2000 | JON BURLINGAME, Jon Burlingame is an occasional contributor to Calendar
The Los Angeles Master Chorale has been leading a double life. It's not just the city's premier choral organization and frequent collaborator with the L.A. Philharmonic, it's fast becoming Hollywood's house choir, having sung in nearly two dozen movies over the past decade (including such hits as "Twister," "Waterworld," "Independence Day" and "Air Force One").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Composer James Newton Howard received the Henry Mancini Award for Lifetime Achievement at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers' 15th annual awards gala. An 18-time winner of ASCAP film and television awards since 1992, Howard, 48, known for his ability to include a range of diverse styles in his scores, composed the music for such films as "The Fugitive," "The Prince of Tides," "Pretty Woman" and "The Sixth Sense."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2000 | DEVRA MAZA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Love songs have always scored the passions of our lives. For so long, the source of those songs have been the movies. As a screenwriter coming of age in the era of action films, I've longed for the lost days of musicals, where songs of ardor spilled off the screen into real life and swept up anyone who listened. Those are the songs that made lovers, and, which in turn, lovers took as their own. When a couple connect to a love song, the lyrics and melody wrap around them wherever or whenever it is played, raising their romance to cinematic heights on cue. To say "Darling, let's make this our song" is to choose a theme for your love.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, Jon Burlingame is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Six of the movies' greatest composers--men whose music was far better known than their names--are about to receive an unprecedented degree of nationwide face time: Their images on postage stamps. Max Steiner, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Alfred Newman, Franz Waxman, Bernard Herrmann and Dimitri Tiomkin are featured in the Hollywood Composers series of 33-cent stamps to be unveiled in ceremonies at 10 a.m. Thursday at the Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
At the age of 5, Jerry Goldsmith sat in the last row of the Hollywood Bowl, listening to Jascha Heifetz and the Los Angeles Philharmonic play Brahms' violin concerto. This week, he's a lot closer to the action, conducting the Philharmonic in an evening of his own music--scores from such films as "L.A. Confidential" and "Chinatown," TV themes from "The Waltons," and "Dr. Kildare," plus the world premiere of a classical piece commissioned to accompany fireworks and celebrate his 70th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British avant-garde composer Jocelyn Pook may be one of the luckiest musicians around. Not only did director Stanley Kubrick ask her to write original music for his "Eyes Wide Shut," he actually used it. The legendary director was well known for his use of classical music: Strauss and Ligeti in "2001: A Space Odyssey," Beethoven and Purcell in "A Clockwork Orange," Handel and Schubert in "Barry Lyndon," Bartok and Penderecki in "The Shining."
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