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Movie Themes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Lynwood woman was stabbed to death by her teenage son and nephew in an attack the boys told authorities was inspired by the horror movies "Scream" and "Scream 2," investigators and family friends said Wednesday. Rita Castillo, 37, was attacked in her apartment in the 3700 block of East Imperial Highway on Tuesday afternoon, a Los Angeles County sheriff's spokesman said. Mortally wounded, she managed to call 911 and was taken to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
L.A. indie-rock iconoclast Petra Haden is tapping a childhood musical pastime in her new album coming out early next year, "Petra Goes to the Movies," which finds her singing classic movie themes. Not movie songs, but the instrumental themes from the likes of "Taxi Driver," "Rebel Without a Cause," "Superman," "A Fistful of Dollars" and, yes, even "Psycho" in mostly a cappella vocal arrangements. The album isn't the first time Haden has stretched the boundaries of vocals as an interpretive instrument.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
L.A. indie-rock iconoclast Petra Haden is tapping a childhood musical pastime in her new album coming out early next year, "Petra Goes to the Movies," which finds her singing classic movie themes. Not movie songs, but the instrumental themes from the likes of "Taxi Driver," "Rebel Without a Cause," "Superman," "A Fistful of Dollars" and, yes, even "Psycho" in mostly a cappella vocal arrangements. The album isn't the first time Haden has stretched the boundaries of vocals as an interpretive instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It had all the trappings of a Hollywood red-carpet opening: a crush of journalists, free food and a carefully orchestrated buzz of anticipation. But the hullabaloo at the Kodak Theatre on Thursday morning was due not to the premiere of yet another superhero would-be blockbuster, but to the arrival of a new kid on Hollywood Boulevard: Cirque du Soleil. This summer, the Montreal-based entertainment behemoth will be launching a planned 10-year residence at the Kodak, where a posse of 75 acrobats, aerialists and clowns will perform Cirque's latest big-top extravaganza, the movie-themed "Iris.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The NC-17 rating applied to "When Night Is Falling," and upheld last week by the Motion Picture Assn. of America appeals board, has renewed debate about the ratings board's standards, particularly regarding homoerotic content. The lesbian-themed love story by Canadian filmmaker Patricia Rozema was initially rated NC-17 by the MPAA's ratings board, which is made up of non-industry parents of minor children.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER NOXON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the third take of a crucial scene in "Witness Protection," a new HBO film to be shownSaturday, and actor Tom Sizemore is breathing hard, hopping from foot to foot, shiny drops of sweat collecting on his face. "We can make this more intense," he says. "We can jack up the intensity here." In the scene, Sizemore plays a Boston loan shark who has ratted out his Mafia bosses and enrolled his family in the federal witness protection program.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and AMITABH SHARMA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The movie's theme is forbidden love, with the Romeo a Hindu newspaper journalist and Juliet the daughter of a Muslim brick maker. Their cross-denominational passion is one reason "Bombay" has become one of India's most controversial films. The Censor Board held up the film's release for a month and a half. Once the movie was out, the police commissioner in Hyderabad ordered it withdrawn from 15 theaters. New Delhi posted a heavy police presence for its opening there last Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | RICHARD MAYNARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the release of the "Shaft" remake today, there's bound to be another blast of nostalgia for the so-called "blaxploitation" genre of the early '70s. Keenen Ivory Wayans' "I'm Gonna Git You Sucka!" (1988) sent it up affectionately, never forgetting its ridiculous limitations. Quentin Tarantino's strangely convoluted "Jackie Brown" (1997)--"Coffy" meets Elmore Leonard--reminded us of it again.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1998 | JENNIFER NAPIER-PEARCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Spielberg's vivid "Saving Private Ryan," set during the Allied invasion of Europe in World War II, may leave moviegoers feeling the need for a history refresher course. While the plot of "Ryan," which raked in $30.6 million at the box office last weekend, centers on the fictional search for the last of four American soldier brothers still alive, the setting is fact, using D-day and the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, as its historical backdrop.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Spielberg's almost three-hour "Saving Private Ryan" capitalized on its popular star Tom Hanks and its resoundingly strong reviews to corral an impressive opening weekend of $30.1 million in 2,463 theaters, more than $12,000 a screen. The total far exceeded DreamWorks' expectations. The fledgling studio, which is releasing the film in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2009 | Claire Noland
Arthur Ferrante, one half of the piano duo Ferrante and Teicher whose lush orchestral recordings of 1960s movie themes propelled them to popular and commercial success, has died. He was 88. Ferrante died of natural causes early Saturday at his home in Longboat Key, Fla., his manager, Scott W. Smith, said Sunday. Lou Teicher died in August 2008 at age 83. "Although we were two individuals, at the twin pianos our brains worked as one," Ferrante said last year after Teicher's death.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. studio struck a multibillion-dollar joint venture deal Wednesday with two Abu Dhabi companies that would bring such American icons as Bugs Bunny, Roadrunner and Scooby-Doo to the Persian Gulf region. The partners have agreed to build a theme park, a hotel and multiplex cinemas in Abu Dhabi, the leading power in the United Arab Emirates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Joel Hirschhorn, the songwriter who shared Academy Awards for theme songs in two catastrophe-oriented motion pictures, "The Poseidon Adventure" and "The Towering Inferno," has died. He was 67. Hirschhorn, who lived in Agoura Hills, died early Sunday of a heart attack at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, his wife, documentary producer Jennifer Carter Hirschhorn, said Monday. She said Hirschhorn had fallen Friday night and broken his shoulder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2004 | Kristen Campbell, Religion News Service
From "Spider-Man 2" and "King Arthur" to "Troy" and "Fahrenheit 9/11," themes of good and evil abound at the multiplex this summer. Some religious officials are putting that fact to use at the pulpit. "Movies are modern parables," said David DiCerto, media reviewer for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office of Film and Broadcasting. "Christ used the mass medium of his time. I think storytelling has always been the most effective way of getting the message across."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Susan King
Although the gangster film came of age in America in the 1930s with such classics as "Public Enemy" with James Cagney, "Little Caesar" starring Edward G. Robinson, and Paul Muni in "Scarface," the genre quickly made its way across the Atlantic when French filmmakers realized these provocative movies could easily be given a Gallic sensibility. French cinema found its perfect gangster hero in tough-guy-with-a-heart Jean Gabin, who appeared in such films as "Pepe le Moko" and "Le Jour Se Leve."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2003 | Patt Morrison, Times Staff Writer
If an actor can make it big in government, what's to stop a government guy from taking a stab at acting? The state controller, Steve Westly, is ordinarily a staid fellow, but in his invitation to reporters last week to show up for an event, he played scriptwriter, casting director and snack-meister.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Kevin Smith is talking about the Catholic dogma of papal infallibility. He's fondly recounting how his eighth-grade religion teacher, Sister Theresa, sparked his hunger for deeper inquiry into topics like the lives of the saints and the Gnostic gospels. He's even talking--seriously--about becoming a deacon after his movie-making days are over so he can use his gift of gab to sell Jesus in a hip and passionate way.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
October Films lost its bid this week to overturn an NC-17 rating on Trey Parker's upcoming film "Orgazmo," and attorney Alan Dershowitz--who was retained by October--thinks that makes no sense. "The thing about 'Orgazmo' is it's adolescent humor. Therefore, adolescents should be able to see it," Dershowitz said of the comedy about a young Mormon man who stumbles into the lead role in a porno film that becomes a big hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day Bob Berney got an early-morning phone call from his mother in Oklahoma City, he knew the movie his company--IFC Films--had released, "Y Tu Mama Tambien," was something of a phenomenon. Last Sunday, the Daily Oklahoman ran a story on the front of its entertainment section featuring "Tu Mama," a sexually explicit, Spanish-language, Mexican teenage-coming-of-age-movie--not the typical kind of entertainment Oklahomans are accustomed to reading about in their paper.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2002 | RICHARD VERRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co., which transformed the near-bankrupt Disneyland Paris into Europe's most visited tourist attraction, adds some Hollywood glitz to its French resort with the opening Saturday of a theme park modeled on its studio tour in Orlando, Fla. The 50-acre park, called Walt Disney Studios, is billed as a tribute to American and European cinema and is next to Disneyland Paris.
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