Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMovie Themes
IN THE NEWS

Movie Themes

ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The movies have finally caught up with fame. The long-held perception that audiences are not interested in the behind-the-scenes machinations of show business has changed in an era that finds the contestants in staged, unscripted TV shows like "Survivor" lavished with the kind of attention once reserved for seriously accomplished artists. And now, movies are getting back into the act.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | DON OLDENBURG, WASHINGTON POST
"Not that bad," said James Lim, 16, a student at W.T. Woodson High in Fairfax, Va., suggesting that the swords scene inside the majestic Cambodian tomb in the movie "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider" reminded him of scenes in the Tomb Raider video games. Lingering after Tysons Fairfax Square Cinema cleared out its matinee crowd recently, Lim and several friends considered how Hollywood had fared in translating the adventures of the video game goddess into a film starring Angelina Jolie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2001 | MICHAEL SRAGOW, BALTIMORE SUN
The youth-trash conquest of summer moviegoing became complete in 1981. That's when it was decided that comic-book movies, coming-of-age comedies and shoot-'em-ups would constitute the daily bread of film fans from May to mid-September. Think back to the dark spring of 1981. One highly touted film after another, pushed out of its studio nest, swiftly flops. Paul Newman can't save "Fort Apache, the Bronx." Sigourney Weaver and William Hurt go down with "Eyewitness."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | CARLA KUCINSKI, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Hollywood is getting fat. With increasing frequency, actors on screens big and small are slipping into fat suits for laughs. Comedian Martin Short is the latest actor to weigh in. Short's half-hour show "Primetime Glick" had its premiere on Comedy Central last week. With the help of makeup and a fat suit, Short transforms into celebrity interviewer Jiminy Glick, the overweight, jolly and clueless host of a fictitious talk show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2001 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In our house, we take movies very seriously. We like to know what's opening this weekend and what's slated for summer. We watch the billboards and coming attractions and take notes. We mark our calendars. It's not that we're in any way connected with the industry, nor are we the kind of stadium-seat analysts who stand around at parties throwing out names and project titles as if they were sports scores or quotations from Lao-tse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Will Smith is dancing around the boxing ring, throwing a few practice jabs before shooting a scene, when he notices a pesky newspaper columnist leaning against the ropes, taking notes. "Is there a journalist out there?" he shouts, his voice dripping with sarcasm. "Because I need me a journalist to whup!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | MICHAEL SRAGOW, BALTIMORE SUN
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the prewar U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | STEPHEN HUNTER, WASHINGTON POST
Hey, kids, let's deconstruct a musical! Well, actually, let's deconstruct two musicals: "Moulin Rouge," and "A Knight's Tale." But, you are saying, "A Knight's Tale" isn't a musical, it's a teen-toned "Rocky" about a kid from the wrong side of the tracks getting his shot in the tony world of tournament jousting circa 1400, give or take a century. It is.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2001 | STEPHEN FARBER, Stephen Farber is a critic for Movieline magazine and a regular contributor to Calendar
Everyone who works in the thriller genre inevitably spends part of the time looking over his or her shoulder at Alfred Hitchcock, who articulated many of his theories and techniques for jolting an audience in his published conversations with the late French director Francois Truffaut. In one of the most incisive sections of that interview, he discussed the difference between suspense and surprise, and declared his preference for suspense.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hong Kong, a region with a population of a mere 6.7 million, has produced one of the world's most influential film industries, especially when it comes to action. And much credit for that kinetic genre, the Hong Kong action film, goes to one man: Tsui Hark. Over the last two decades, he has directed or produced 50 feature films, including some of the classics of the genre. For a while, he exhibited the Midas touch: Everything with which he was involved turned to box-office gold.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|