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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | CARLA KUCINSKI, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Hollywood is getting fat. With increasing frequency, actors on screens big and small are slipping into fat suits for laughs. Comedian Martin Short is the latest actor to weigh in. Short's half-hour show "Primetime Glick" had its premiere on Comedy Central last week. With the help of makeup and a fat suit, Short transforms into celebrity interviewer Jiminy Glick, the overweight, jolly and clueless host of a fictitious talk show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Will Smith is dancing around the boxing ring, throwing a few practice jabs before shooting a scene, when he notices a pesky newspaper columnist leaning against the ropes, taking notes. "Is there a journalist out there?" he shouts, his voice dripping with sarcasm. "Because I need me a journalist to whup!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | MICHAEL SRAGOW, BALTIMORE SUN
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the prewar U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | STEPHEN HUNTER, WASHINGTON POST
Hey, kids, let's deconstruct a musical! Well, actually, let's deconstruct two musicals: "Moulin Rouge," and "A Knight's Tale." But, you are saying, "A Knight's Tale" isn't a musical, it's a teen-toned "Rocky" about a kid from the wrong side of the tracks getting his shot in the tony world of tournament jousting circa 1400, give or take a century. It is.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hong Kong, a region with a population of a mere 6.7 million, has produced one of the world's most influential film industries, especially when it comes to action. And much credit for that kinetic genre, the Hong Kong action film, goes to one man: Tsui Hark. Over the last two decades, he has directed or produced 50 feature films, including some of the classics of the genre. For a while, he exhibited the Midas touch: Everything with which he was involved turned to box-office gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | MARK CARO, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Every once in a while, something in our culture forces us to confront the thin line between art and dreck. People previously have debated the merits of Andy Warhol's soup cans, Yoko Ono's screeching and the completely white painting at the center of Yasmina Reza's acclaimed play "Art." Now we have Tom Green's "Freddy Got Fingered," the cinematic equivalent of that blank "Art" canvas spattered with various bodily fluids, often nonhuman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American International Pictures' motto was, "Make 'em fast and make 'em cheap." Really cheap. Samuel Z. Arkoff, who founded the scrappy little studio with the late Jim Nicholson, recalls the time producer-director Roger Corman was given a mere $29,000 to make the 1955 horror flick "The Beast With a Million Eyes." "Roger said, 'I can't do it [for that budget],' " recalls Arkoff, now 83. "I said, 'Roger, you can do it.' So he went off to Palm Springs to make the movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The only music I make . . . is with my bat. --Roy Hobbs in "The Natural" by Bernard Malamud * Baseball is again in the air, with today's kadzillionaire players about to briefly share TV time with a few of their famous predecessors. As HBO prepares to show "61*"--its very watchable movie about Roger Maris' tortuous brush with baseball greatness alongside Mickey Mantle--and Cinemax its winning documentary on slugger supreme Hank Greenberg, here is what many in Mudville are aching to know.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2001 | JUDY STONE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Paris, Tokyo, Uganda, New York, Cannes, Montreal, Beirut, Rome, Washington, D.C., and Durham, N.C., are just some of the stops Abbas Kiarostami has made during an incredible year for the unique Iranian director. Now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which has held a three-week retrospective of his films, Kiarostami will be honored Saturday. (The director had been scheduled to attend the tribute, but he had to cancel because of illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2001 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Rachel Abramowitz is a Times staff writer
When writer-director Henry Bean left the Sundance Film Festival in January, he floated out of Utah on a cloud of expectation. His film, "The Believer," a controversial but powerful examination of a young Jewish neo-Nazi agitator-based on a true story-had won the Grand Jury Prize, and companies such as Paramount Classics, Miramax and USA Films swirled around, apparently poised to purchase it for distribution.
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