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Movies Finances

ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | ANDY MARX and ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A completion bond company that assumed control of "Malcolm X" after director Spike Lee's film climbed $5 million over budget is refusing to pay to finish the film and has complained that Lee's production office may have deliberately withheld notification that the film's editors were being laid off as of last Friday. In a sternly worded letter to Lee's New York lawyer dated March 26, an attorney for Completion Bond Co.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1990 | ALAN CITRON and MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Giancarlo Parretti, the fast-rising Hollywood movie mogul who has admitted that he rarely watches films himself, underscored the point at the Cannes Film Festival a couple of years ago. Encountering actor-director Clint Eastwood and his agent at a party, Parretti said: "Mr. Eastwood, I've always admired your work." The problem was that he was speaking to the agent. Those types of blunders have helped shape Parretti's reputation as a consummate outsider.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conniving Cruella outmaneuvered the brutal Borg to catapult "101 Dalmatians" to the top--and potentially record-breaking--spot at the box office over the holiday weekend. The spotted pups brought in a projected all-time Thanksgiving weekend high of $46 million, edging out the most successful installment of the "Star Trek" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new player in feature films these days, a production company that is attracting big-name actors and directors, tackling difficult material and, with the three Oscar nominations nailed by "Gods and Monsters" earlier this month, even winning academy recognition. The new force in the movie business? An old stalwart in the television business: Showtime.
NEWS
June 19, 1991 | JAMES BATES and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The name Credit Lyonnais frequently showed up in the 1980s as credits rolled at the end of films. Once, a lending officer of the French government-owned bank was thanked by a producer accepting the Academy Award for best picture. Bank officers could approve film scripts and casting decisions on pictures, a rare right for a lender.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1999
The report is based on projections of total U.S. box-office gross from a consensus of industry sources and studio financial models. The U.S. returns represent only 20% of a film's final revenue, which includes income from video, TV and overseas theatrical. The industry marketing average of $30 million per film is factored into these profit equations, as is the relative strength of specific film genres in foreign markets. Results for the weekend of Oct.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Come Oscar time, Ang Lee's martial-arts romance "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" will surely win awards. And a special statuette should go to the film's co-writer and producer, James Schamus, for a remarkable performance by a financial acrobat. Schamus delivered an epic network of cross-cultural funding. He not only found financing for the arthouse fare, but he managed that feat with a $15-million Chinese language film, one of the worst box office bets around.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
Last week in San Francisco on the set of "Two Goldsteins on Acid," Hollywood titan-turned-producer Sid Sheinberg had an epiphany. While watching a scene with Alicia Witt, the young star of the low-budget comedy, he noticed something amiss and summoned the woman in charge of wardrobe. "My God," thought the former president of MCA Inc. "I've gone from running a $7-billion company to getting a bra strap straight."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1999 | SUSAN KING and SOURCE: Exhibitor Relations Co.
Hollywood Pictures' "The Sixth Sense" took away some of the thunder from "The Blair Witch Project." The Bruce Willis ghost story nabbed the No. 1 spot in its opening weekend with $26.7 million, making it the highest-grossing August-opening film. It finished ahead of "The Fugitive," which opened to $23.7 million six years ago. "Sixth Sense" is the third $20-million-plus opener for Disney this summer. "Blair Witch" added 1,041 screens to hold onto second place with $24.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Movie-making and hype have enjoyed a long and profitable relationship. Showmen such as "Cleopatra" director Cecil B. DeMille and "Around the World in 80 Days" producer Mike Todd staked out the turf long before studio marketing departments counted on national TV campaigns, licensing, merchandising, soundtrack albums and theme-park rides to help get the word out.
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