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NEWS
June 8, 2010
Critics' Choices Babies In this joyous and buoyant new documentary, the filmmakers keep the baby — and the bathwater — and everything else about infants that makes them so appealing that the rest of us keep making more of them. Squalls are few, colic doesn't exist, neither does disease, diaper rash, or diapers at all for that matter as director Thomas Balmes traces the first year in the lives of four infants from four corners of the world. The sweet-smelling "Babies" is a very huggable movie experience, just not a primer on parenthood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The holiday season brings quality cinema entries. But sometimes one leaves the theater thinking, "That was good, but it could have been better" Or perhaps, "That was good, but it could have been better if filmmakers were a little more open to other influences. " Here, then, are a few suggestions for alternate titles, holiday hits that could have been slightly more enjoyable if only their filmmakers had paid attention to a few of the other movies out there. Hollywood executives these days like spinoffs and brand extensions, so we wouldn't be surprised if some of these end up at the multiplex in Christmas seasons to come.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The holiday season brings quality cinema entries. But sometimes one leaves the theater thinking, "That was good, but it could have been better" Or perhaps, "That was good, but it could have been better if filmmakers were a little more open to other influences. " Here, then, are a few suggestions for alternate titles, holiday hits that could have been slightly more enjoyable if only their filmmakers had paid attention to a few of the other movies out there. Hollywood executives these days like spinoffs and brand extensions, so we wouldn't be surprised if some of these end up at the multiplex in Christmas seasons to come.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
There are trolls who live under bridges in fantasy novels. Then there are "copyright trolls. " The latter have always occupied one of the most squalid corners of the legal system. They're people or firms that acquire copyrights to movies, music or other creative works chiefly to turn a profit by filing lawsuits alleging piracy. Often the threat of a lawsuit is used to scare Web users into paying nominal settlement fees to avoid legal costs and a big penalty. Collect a few checks of a few thousand bucks each from enough defendants, and presto!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009
Re "The Mighty '39ers" by Susan King, May 6: Listing those movies released in 1939 makes me wonder whatever happened to the movie industry. How could we have gone from those stellar films ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Stagecoach," etc.) to the "destroy/kill/maim/kill again" kind of movies I see advertised now? Yes, I am old enough to have seen each of these movies. How I long for these kinds of movies again. Carol Marshall Anaheim :: Re "Claws and All" by Kenneth Turan, April 30: What has happened to American culture when a leading and respected movie critic of the L.A. Times can wax rhapsodic over an alleged motion picture ("X-Men Origins")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010 | By Susan King
The 1930 movie musical "Mammy" is an important -- if almost shockingly racially insensitive -- piece in the canon of the legendary Al Jolson's career. "Mammy" stars "The World's Greatest Entertainer" -- a moniker Jolson had for 40 years -- in his only feature that was shot partly in early two-strip Technicolor. The score was by the legendary Irving Berlin and includes the standard "Let Me Sing and I'm Happy." The film was directed by Michael Curtiz, who later won an Oscar for "Casablanca."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | PAM LOPEZ-JOHNSON
Century City AMC multiplex-goers who are in the mood for dinner before a movie won't have to skip dessert to skirt a sold-out show anymore. And that automated-teller-machine stop on the way may be passe too. That's because beginning today, selected AMC Entertainment Inc. theaters will start accepting charge cards and Cineplex Odeon will begin honoring American Express cards. "Going to the movies is not a spontaneous experience anymore," AMC senior vice president Frank Stryjewski said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2002 | Brian Koppelman and David Levien, Special to The Times
"When's your movie coming out?" These five words have been thrown at us so many times over the past 18 months that they've started to sound more like an accusation than a question. We've heard them on conference calls with studio execs, at neighborhood block parties, even in the middle of pickup basketball games. Our dentists, whom we see only at six-month intervals, have gotten the opportunity to ask three times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One minute you're delivering linguine. The next minute you're delivering lines. That's the way it's going for one group of struggling Hollywood actors who support themselves working for a Westside takeout service. Instead of waiting for their big break, these food delivery drivers decided to film their own feature-length movie. About themselves. One of them wrote the screenplay. Three others helped produce the comedy for about $80,000. One directed it. Six of them starred in it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | BETH KLEID
For the first few days of filming his movie, "Metropolitan," freshman writer-director Whit Stillman clutched his security blanket, a copy of a book called "How to Direct a Movie." Maybe Stillman was uncomfortable with the logistics of directing, but he was right at home with the scene he set: lush Manhattan apartments filled with elegantly dressed young debs and their dates gabbing intensely about love and life at "after-parties."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Payroll records appear to contradict how much money a Los Angeles police officer who brought down the so-called "bling ring" said he was paid to work as technical advisor on a movie about the case. Officer Brett Goodkin, who is currently under investigation by the LAPD for consulting on Sofia Coppola's docu-drama while assigned to the case, was paid between $5,000 and $6,000, authorities said. But payroll records turned over to defendants in the burglary case show he was paid $12,500 by the filmmaker and her production company.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Channing Tatum lowers his green eyes and stares at the camera. "Your friend wanted me to tell you that they think you're pretty awesome," the 31-year-old actor says. "And they love hanging with you. " Tatum's performance wasn't from a movie, but a "Sweet Nothings" video that marketers for his new film, "The Vow," posted on Facebook in advance of its opening last weekend. It worked: The romantic tear-jerker blew past expectations to open at No. 1 with $41.2 million in North American ticket sales.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Downtown Los Angeles has been a favored filming location since the days of the silent movies. But rarely do filmmakers get a chance to shine a spotlight on people who actually live on its streets, especially in a 50-block area known as skid row. All that changed when Karen Gilbert and other crew members collaborated on "Lost Angels: Skid Row Is My Home," a 75-minute documentary featuring wrenching stories of the men and women who live downtown...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Officials at USC's School of Cinematic Arts have warmly embraced the digital era in filmmaking, but they also realize that silent movies are golden. On Monday evening, the school held a dedication for the Cecil B. DeMille Endowed Chair in Silent Film. Cecilia DeMille Presley, granddaughter of the man who made 1952's Oscar-winner "The Greatest Show on Earth" and 1956's "The Ten Commandments," was on hand to talk to USC cinema students about DeMille and to screen his erotic 1915 melodrama "The Cheat.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
As a professional basketball player in Germany, Deon Taylor dreamed of taking a shot with everything on the line ? not a three-pointer as the buzzer sounded but as a movie director. The American-born Taylor played point guard overseas from 1999 to 2002 and participated in the NBA's celebrity-laden entertainment league, passing to the likes of Ice Cube and Justin Timberlake. He studied biology at San Diego State and knew nothing about filmmaking. But Taylor loved movies and would study the bonus scenes on DVDs in his apartment in Europe, trying to figure out how directors did their jobs and scribbling out screenplays longhand on a legal pad. "I was more interested in business and pursuing film" than basketball, says Taylor, 35. "Everything I know about the film business, I learned from DVD extras.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
Critics' Choices Babies In this joyous and buoyant new documentary, the filmmakers keep the baby — and the bathwater — and everything else about infants that makes them so appealing that the rest of us keep making more of them. Squalls are few, colic doesn't exist, neither does disease, diaper rash, or diapers at all for that matter as director Thomas Balmes traces the first year in the lives of four infants from four corners of the world. The sweet-smelling "Babies" is a very huggable movie experience, just not a primer on parenthood.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | DAVE GRIMM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A unique motion picture studio is dying in the same way it came to life, amid piles of twisted automotive debris. Filmmaker Henry B. (Toby) Halicki used his unnamed Gardena studio, and often the city's streets and sidewalks, to film epic car-crash movies that thrilled gearheads worldwide and made him a wealthy man. He was killed at age 48 in an accident on the set while filming the sequel to his hit "Gone in 60 Seconds."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010 | By Susan King
The 1930 movie musical "Mammy" is an important -- if almost shockingly racially insensitive -- piece in the canon of the legendary Al Jolson's career. "Mammy" stars "The World's Greatest Entertainer" -- a moniker Jolson had for 40 years -- in his only feature that was shot partly in early two-strip Technicolor. The score was by the legendary Irving Berlin and includes the standard "Let Me Sing and I'm Happy." The film was directed by Michael Curtiz, who later won an Oscar for "Casablanca."
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