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September 30, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A New Address: Actress Daphne Zuniga ("The Sure Thing," "Gross Anatomy") is joining Fox's "Melrose Place," cast as an aspiring young photographer who is running away from her past. Her first episodes will turn up in November.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Chorale master Paul Salamunovich once said that the greatest moment of his life was a 1988 concert at the Vatican for Pope John Paul II with the group he had led continuously since 1949, the St. Charles Borromeo Church Choir of North Hollywood. But it was his experience with choral music as a Southern California teenager that provided the underpinning for nearly everything he did over the next six-plus decades, including his role in shaping the Los Angeles Master Chorale into one of the world's finest choirs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | David Colker
When Dick Van Dyke got the role of Bert in the 1964 movie musical "Mary Poppins," Walt Disney asked him if he had a recommendation for a choreographer. Van Dyke recalled working with the team of Marc Breaux and Dee Dee Wood, who had created a number for the Jack Benny television show. "I'm not really a dancer," Van Dyke said. "I could move a little and I was what you call an eccentric dancer -- loose limbed and light on my feet. But they took what I could do and made the most of it. I was just thrilled.
HOME & GARDEN
February 7, 2014 | Chris Erskine
So I'm waiting at a stoplight when another piece of techno-pop skitters across the car radio, and the notion hits me: Is romance dead? Better suited perhaps to a Time magazine cover or an article in New York magazine, the question nonetheless is soon embedded in my brain. "Hey, is romance dead?" I ask a colleague. "For you, maybe," she says. I've been married 32 years, so the truth is yes and no, hot and cold, feast or famine. You want swoony, gobsmacked love, look at my wedding photos.
NEWS
April 25, 1993
The City Council appointed a liaison Tuesday to enforce city guidelines for movie and television filming in Monrovia. The city's Old Town business district has been popular for many years as a location for movies, television and commercials. Ivan Andjuar, a member of the city's administrative services staff, will supervise film shoots to make sure the companies abide by prearranged hours and guidelines that allow businesses to remain open during filming. Assistant City Manager Donald R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Kim Chan, a character actor who broke through in film playing Jerry Lewis' butler in "The King of Comedy," died Sunday in New York City. He was believed to be either 93 or 94, his niece told the New York Times. After emigrating as a boy with his family from the province of Canton, China, he worked at his family's Chinese restaurant in New York City's theater district and discovered show business. He started out appearing in small parts in plays. In 1957, he made his film debut as a radio announcer in "A Face in the Crowd."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Jacqui Landrum, a dancer who with her husband, Bill, choreographed a number of films, including "Great Balls of Fire" and "The Doors," has died. She was 64. Landrum died of cancer Aug. 29 at her home in Los Angeles, her husband said. As a team, the Landrums mixed classical, ballet, modern jazz, ethnic and club dancing to choreograph movies, television and stage. To research "Great Balls of Fire," a 1989 film with actor Dennis Quaid as rock 'n' roll pioneer Jerry Lee Lewis, they cruised juke joints and cowboy clubs in Memphis, looking for authentic steps to teach him. "Every actor has a nightmare dance story," Jacqui Landrum said in a 1989 interview with The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Robert Sidney, who choreographed for the Broadway stage and Las Vegas nightclubs as well as for movies and television, died of pneumonia March 26 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, according to publicist Dale Olson. He was 98. Best known for his work in "This Is the Army," a 1942 Broadway show with music by Irving Berlin that later toured the world and was made into a movie in 1943, Sidney went on to create dance numbers for many of Hollywood's major talents.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Pete Seeger, the singer, songwriter and social activist who died  Monday at age 94, didn't have much of a movie career, making his mark with music instead. But the troubadour did pop up on screen from time to time, in documentaries, concert footage, his own TV series and even the odd comedy. Here's a look at some of Seeger's work on the big and small screens. "To Hear Your Banjo Play" (1947) In 1947, a young Seeger appeared in and narrated this 16-minute survey of folk music in the U.S. written by musicologist Alan Lomax.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
LAS VEGAS - Joann Killeen had never before purchased a digital video, but she took the plunge this holiday season. She forked over $3.28 each to watch the children's show "Yo Gabba Gabba" on her Apple iPad and dance along with a friend's grandchildren to the thump of another Nick Jr. show, "The Fresh Beat Band. " Killeen, 62, is not alone in busting a move. Digital sales have nearly doubled in the last year, becoming the fastest-growing source of home entertainment revenue for Hollywood studios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | David Colker
When Dick Van Dyke got the role of Bert in the 1964 movie musical "Mary Poppins," Walt Disney asked him if he had a recommendation for a choreographer. Van Dyke recalled working with the team of Marc Breaux and Dee Dee Wood, who had created a number for the Jack Benny television show. "I'm not really a dancer," Van Dyke said. "I could move a little and I was what you call an eccentric dancer -- loose limbed and light on my feet. But they took what I could do and made the most of it. I was just thrilled.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The park is named after the late actor and conservationist Leo Carrillo, who played the comic sidekick Pancho in the 1950s Western TV series "The Cisco Kid. " Located along Pacific Coast Highway near the Los Angeles-Ventura County line, it has doubled for Iwo Jima, the Caribbean and Hawaii. For six decades, Leo Carrillo State Park has been one of the most popular beaches, not only for Los Angeles residents but for location scouts. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments From "Grease" to "Pirates of the Caribbean" and "Letters From Iwo Jima," the scenic stretch of beach has been featured in countless movies, TV shows and commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
As Internet video streaming becomes more commonplace in American households, a maker of dedicated devices introduced a new lineup of products and expanded programming options in hopes of capitalizing on this trend. Roku unveiled three new streaming players, priced at $50 to $80, that it says will offer high-definition video, among other features. These devices, with names only a geek could love (the Roku LT, Roku 1 and Roku 2), reach stores in October. Roku also is adding the M-Go movie and television service to its entertainment offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Dana Ferguson
In its first 10 years Disney Hall became more than a home for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, it also became a destination for photographing advertisements and filming commercials, television shows and movies. Howard Sherman, vice president of operations at the Music Center, said the product of Frank Gehry's imagination works on film because the hall can be so many things to so many people. "If they want futuristic stainless steel curves, this is where they come. If they want a space to do a formal black tie gala in a traditional environment, this is where they can come," he said.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
"Pop star to wig star" - that's how Bob Kretschmer describes his unusual career path. The former member of the band Icehouse now works as an expert wig maker for films including Fox's "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" and Sony's "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones. " "I find the process is the same - music and wig making," he said. "Obviously, it's a different thing you're making, but it's very creative. It's very intense. " Kretschmer, 64, who was born in Australia, traces his fascination with music and hair all the way back to Elvis Presley.
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