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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Stephen Colbert's "Colbert Report" has never been the most comfortable place for Hollywood stars to promote their movies, given the somewhat niche audience and Colbert's own purposefully bombastic, playfully antagonistic persona. But now that Colbert is stepping up to succeed David Letterman as the host of "The Late Show" in 2015 and dropping his conservative blowhard character, audiences could see a different side of him. Time will tell how Colbert gets along with Hollywood's A-list stars in his new role, and how much of his trademark quirk carries over, but it will certainly be an adjustment both for him and the studios that want their stars on the show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
An alternately delicate and brutal retelling of the memoir by former World War II British Army officer Eric Lomax, "The Railway Man" is an impressively crafted, skillfully acted, highly absorbing journey into a dark corner of world history. Colin Firth plays Lomax in 1980, more than 35 years after being tortured at a Japanese labor camp in Thailand. He learns that Takashi Nagase, the Japanese interpreter at the helm of that cruel, unforgettable punishment, is still alive. Lomax will eventually cross continents to confront his erstwhile captor and hopefully quell the post-traumatic stress disorder that has plagued the self-dubbed "railway enthusiast" for decades.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The MTV Movie Awards is known for its combustible moments and categories honoring such cinematic achievements as “best kiss” and “best gut-wrenching performance.” But when the annual raucousness gets under way Sunday from the Nokia Theatre with Conan O'Brien as host, it will also include a more solemn moment: a tribute to Paul Walker.   The late “Fast & Furious” actor, who died Thanksgiving weekend in a single-car crash, was a fixture at past awards, and the network has decided to honor his memory at this year's event.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
With his death at age 93 on Sunday, Mickey Rooney leaves a show-business legacy spanning eight decades and including more than 200 film credits -- not to mention his many appearances on television and the stage. Here are five movie roles demonstrating the prolific actor's range and endurance as a performer.  The "Andy Hardy" movies (1937-1946, 1958):  Rooney began his career as a toddler in a tuxedo in his parents' vaudeville show, but his breakthrough role -- and the one that would go on to define his career -- was the feisty all-American teen Andy Hardy in a string of popular MGM films beginning with "A Family Affair.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Tourism officials plan to go big to promote the United States to foreign visitors. IMAX big. Brand USA , the public-private partnership to promote the United States abroad, announced plans Monday to film an IMAX movie about the country's national parks to be shown late next year in theaters around the world. The group, which was launched in 2012 and is partly funded by fees charged to visiting tourists, is expected to spend about $10 million on the movie, with sponsors underwriting most of the cost, said Chris Thompson, president and chief executive of Brand USA. Brand USA is working with MacGillivray Freeman Films to produce and complete the documentary by next year, Thompson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The late-night circuit is usually a well-oiled Hollywood hype machine through which movie stars and hot-shot directors can safely plug their latest films. Every once in a while, though, things go off the rails, a phenomenon that seems to happen with a bit more frequency on Letterman, whose arched detachment can allow those moments to play out in all their awkward glory. In honor of the "Late Show" host's announcement that he plans to retire in 2015 , here are five of the most memorable movie guests to grace Letterman's couch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Chorale master Paul Salamunovich once said that the greatest moment of his life was a 1988 concert at the Vatican for Pope John Paul II with the group he had led continuously since 1949, the St. Charles Borromeo Church Choir of North Hollywood. But it was his experience with choral music as a Southern California teenager that provided the underpinning for nearly everything he did over the next six-plus decades, including his role in shaping the Los Angeles Master Chorale into one of the world's finest choirs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Call it a dark farce, human comedy or wartime satire. But however you slice it, the ill-conceived morality tale "A Farewell to Fools" is a bust. Set in the waning days of World War II, the movie involves a group of Romanian villagers attempting to trick the resident fool, Ipu (Gérard Depardieu in hyper-slob mode), into giving up his life in order to save theirs. Unfortunately, the script by Anusavan Salamanian, based on the novel by Titus Popovici (first filmed as 1972's "Then I Sentenced Them All to Death")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Krysten Ritter and Brian Geraghty, performers who have delivered striking work elsewhere, are hard to read in "Refuge," a torpid drama about a tentative new romance. Or perhaps they're too easy to read; whatever emotional depths filmmaker Jessica Goldberg hopes to suggest, there's nothing stirring beneath the movie's static surface. The central characters' coupledom might bring them a safe haven, but audiences will be left out in the cold. Adapting her stage play, Goldberg uses wintry Southampton, N.Y., locations to convey a down-and-out working-class vibe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Abele
With a title like "Hot Guys With Guns," actor turned writer-director Doug Spearman's niche comedy-mystery aimed at pop culture-savvy gays makes plain its intentions - titillation, tension and titters - and for the undiscerning, it's likely to deliver. After a chicly designed credit sequence that appealingly spoofs James Bond openings, we settle on caustically friendly exes Danny (a likable Marc Anthony Samuel), a sweet-faced out-of-work actor taking private eye classes, and Patrick/Pip (Brian McArdle)
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