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FOOD
May 21, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Almost everyone who sees a Pakistan mulberry for the first time exclaims, "Oh, my gosh, what is that?" It certainly is bizarre looking, a long, thin, purplish, snakelike fruit, anywhere from 1 to 5 inches long, with 3 inches being typical. Although not yet exactly common at farmers markets, they're not nearly as rare as they used to be even a few years ago. Aside from looking weird, they're quite delicious, with a mild, fruity flavor and a good balance of sweetness and acidity. One eats this berry as one might a satay, grabbing the stem and stripping the flesh off with one's teeth from the long, stringy central core, which is edible but not particularly pleasant.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By David Karp
This week may be the best of the year for high-flavored fruit that's worth a special trip to local farmers markets, because it's almost never available elsewhere. Start with boysenberries, whose rich, complex, sweet-tart flavor reflects their ancestry, part raspberry, part trailing blackberry. To be at their best, they must be picked dead-ripe, when they're too soft and perishable for supermarkets, and even at farmers market just a few vendors take the trouble. Look for containers in which all or most of the berries are deep purple, indicating full ripeness; less ripe berries are better for baking or making preserves.
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FOOD
July 8, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Last Wednesday at the Santa Monica market, rivulets of sweat coursed down the brow of Ron Cornelsen, a stone fruit grower from Reedley, and it was only 9 a.m. The previous day it had been 107 degrees in his orchard, and the monsoonal humidity made things so miserable that he had to pay his workers a 30% premium to harvest under such brutal conditions, he said. Even worse, after an unusual late downpour last week, much of his crop dropped from the trees and developed brown rot when it warmed up. When the heat takes such a toll on both humans and produce, it's time to appreciate those growers, like Cornelsen, who get up at 3 a.m. and drive in from the Fresno area to sell personally at farmers markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
In the film based on her memoir "Mulberry Child," Jian Ping speaks of her family's ordeal during the Cultural Revolution with searing detail and not an ounce of sentimentality. The same can't be said of director Susan Morgan Cooper's heavy-handed approach to the material. Moving between a present-day mother-daughter clash of values and a personal history of life under Mao's regime, her docudrama is an awkward mix. Especially distracting are the reenactments, which undercut the power of the film's archival images - among them photographs taken surreptitiously by one of China's Red Guardsmen.
FOOD
July 6, 2005 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
Growing most fruit is best left to farmers. It's a science, and they're better at it. Persian mulberries, also called black mulberries, are an exception to this rule. They are best grown at home, with as short a commute from bough to tongue as possible. The berries are barely contained juice and, despite their fragility, have persisted as a delicacy only because of the intensity of that juice.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Liane Bonin, Special to The Times
Green eggs and ham, a cat in the hat and ... "unorthodox" taxidermy? If that last entry in the Dr. Seuss pantheon seems a tad "Silence of the Lambs" for your taste, take heart: Though "The Art of Dr. Seuss: A Retrospective and National Touring Exhibition" at the Sarah Bain Gallery in Brea promises to reveal the "secret" art of the famed children's book author, what's on display is simply grown-up stuff, not nightmare material. Not surprisingly, Dr. Seuss, a.k.a.
FOOD
July 19, 2000 | DAVID KARP
Circle C Ranch. Persian mulberries from Lake Hughes, mid-July to mid-September. At Santa Monica farmers market (Arizona Avenue and 2nd Street), Wednesdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Hollywood (Ivar Avenue between Sunset and Hollywood boulevards), Sundays 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Co-Opportunity. Purple-fruited white mulberries from Driscoll Farms, Topanga, June to mid-August. 1525 Broadway, Santa Monica. (310) 451-8902. Eli Hofshi.
NEWS
November 4, 1993
Mulberry Drive will be resurfaced from Colima Road to Scott Avenue in Whittier and nearby unincorporated areas, county officials said. Los Angeles County will provide $554,000 of the $693,000 cost and its Department of Public Works will do the preliminary engineering and administer the project. Deteriorated portions of the pavement, curbs, gutters, sidewalks and driveways also will be repaired. Wheelchair ramps and drainage facilities will be built and guardrails installed.
FOOD
June 25, 2008 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Just in Persian mulberries: Quite frankly, they often don't look like a fruit so sought-after that farmers have to hide them behind the counter. They can be fairly small, like malnourished raspberries, and so fragile that they frequently look a little dinged up from being picked. But Persian mulberries have an intoxicating effect on some people. A friend tasting her first one clapped her hand to her mouth and exclaimed, "This tastes like my grandfather's garden!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
Students at President Avenue Elementary School in Harbor City planted a mulberry tree on campus Wednesday in memory of a second-grade classmate, Ronald "Ronnie" Cade, who died when he was struck by a car while crossing the street on his way to school. Second-graders and children from his 9-year-old sister Alexandria's class took part in the tree planting along with Ronnie's parents, Penny and Ron. Ronnie was fatally injured Sept. 18 when he crossed Normandie Avenue near Pasatiempo.
FOOD
July 8, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Last Wednesday at the Santa Monica market, rivulets of sweat coursed down the brow of Ron Cornelsen, a stone fruit grower from Reedley, and it was only 9 a.m. The previous day it had been 107 degrees in his orchard, and the monsoonal humidity made things so miserable that he had to pay his workers a 30% premium to harvest under such brutal conditions, he said. Even worse, after an unusual late downpour last week, much of his crop dropped from the trees and developed brown rot when it warmed up. When the heat takes such a toll on both humans and produce, it's time to appreciate those growers, like Cornelsen, who get up at 3 a.m. and drive in from the Fresno area to sell personally at farmers markets.
FOOD
June 25, 2010 | By David Karp, Los Angeles Times
For stone fruit growers and buyers, the cool, moist spring yielded mixed results: disastrous losses for many cherry farmers whose crops split in the rain; a banner year for apricots, which have thrived in the milder weather; and a delayed harvest, with so-so quality, for many early peach and nectarine varieties. This coming week, however, a veritable fruit storm will hit the Southland, with some of the year's most eagerly awaited, high-flavored fruits, including Blenheim apricots, Snow Queen white nectarines and Persian mulberries.
FOOD
May 21, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Almost everyone who sees a Pakistan mulberry for the first time exclaims, "Oh, my gosh, what is that?" It certainly is bizarre looking, a long, thin, purplish, snakelike fruit, anywhere from 1 to 5 inches long, with 3 inches being typical. Although not yet exactly common at farmers markets, they're not nearly as rare as they used to be even a few years ago. Aside from looking weird, they're quite delicious, with a mild, fruity flavor and a good balance of sweetness and acidity. One eats this berry as one might a satay, grabbing the stem and stripping the flesh off with one's teeth from the long, stringy central core, which is edible but not particularly pleasant.
FOOD
June 25, 2008 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
Just in Persian mulberries: Quite frankly, they often don't look like a fruit so sought-after that farmers have to hide them behind the counter. They can be fairly small, like malnourished raspberries, and so fragile that they frequently look a little dinged up from being picked. But Persian mulberries have an intoxicating effect on some people. A friend tasting her first one clapped her hand to her mouth and exclaimed, "This tastes like my grandfather's garden!"
FOOD
July 6, 2005 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
Growing most fruit is best left to farmers. It's a science, and they're better at it. Persian mulberries, also called black mulberries, are an exception to this rule. They are best grown at home, with as short a commute from bough to tongue as possible. The berries are barely contained juice and, despite their fragility, have persisted as a delicacy only because of the intensity of that juice.
FOOD
July 6, 2005 | Corie Brown, Times Staff Writer
In the overgrown, mixed-up jumble of an orchard at Circle C, the elderly Persian mulberry trees stand apart, each one's long, rubbery limbs propped up by a ring of 6-foot-high sticks whittled to allow the limbs to rest in a crook at the top. These were the first trees planted by Cheng Ja Blain back in the early 1970s, when Circle C was nothing but high desert tumbleweeds and sagebrush, says her husband, Clarence Blain. He has no idea why she planted them.
NEWS
March 2, 1999 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a rare eye that can look at a palm tree and see something called a truffula, yet Dr. Seuss regularly transformed the commonplace into the whimsical. From the Cat in the Hat and Bartholomew Cubbins to Horton, the Lorax and the Grinch, he married impossibly acrobatic animals with inventive language and created another world. Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, was born on this date in 1904 in the small New England town of Springfield, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
In the film based on her memoir "Mulberry Child," Jian Ping speaks of her family's ordeal during the Cultural Revolution with searing detail and not an ounce of sentimentality. The same can't be said of director Susan Morgan Cooper's heavy-handed approach to the material. Moving between a present-day mother-daughter clash of values and a personal history of life under Mao's regime, her docudrama is an awkward mix. Especially distracting are the reenactments, which undercut the power of the film's archival images - among them photographs taken surreptitiously by one of China's Red Guardsmen.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Liane Bonin, Special to The Times
Green eggs and ham, a cat in the hat and ... "unorthodox" taxidermy? If that last entry in the Dr. Seuss pantheon seems a tad "Silence of the Lambs" for your taste, take heart: Though "The Art of Dr. Seuss: A Retrospective and National Touring Exhibition" at the Sarah Bain Gallery in Brea promises to reveal the "secret" art of the famed children's book author, what's on display is simply grown-up stuff, not nightmare material. Not surprisingly, Dr. Seuss, a.k.a.
MAGAZINE
August 11, 2002 | AMELIA SALTSMAN
If you've ever wondered why people line up at the farmers' markets to pay $10 for a small container of Persian mulberries, then you've probably never tasted one. Morus nigra, black or Persian mulberry varieties, are sweet, with twice the sugar of raspberries but with enough acidity to make them irresistibly intriguing.
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