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Mule Deer

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NEWS
October 4, 2005 | David Lukas
[ ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS ] Many Californians know autumn as the season when deer begin their courtship. By early October, the large bucks have sharpened their impressive racks of antlers and are dueling among themselves or guarding chosen females in preparation for mating.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A remote camera snapped more than 350 high-quality images of mountain lion P-13 and her kittens as they fed on a mule deer over two nights in Malibu Creek State Park last week.  The cameras were set up to check on the male and female kittens, P-30 and P-28, who biologists haven't seen since they were tagged when they were about three weeks old, said biologist Jeff Sikich with the National Park Service. The kittens are now 10 months old, and though they have trackers that pinpoint their locations, Sikich said he was interested in how healthy they look.
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NEWS
February 17, 2004 | Gary Polakovic
Western mule deer herds are in sharp decline, and scientists are working to overcome threats to reverse the trend. Just 40 years ago, an estimated 2.3 million mule deer roamed the West. In Nevada, deer populations have dropped 27% over the last decade, and other states are reporting declines. Mule deer are muscular critters with long ears similar to those of a mule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
State wildlife officials on Friday said they were investigating the beheading of a deer, allegedly by an Avalon city employee who dressed the carcass and then left the head dangling in a soccer net near a preschool and City Hall. "We are investigating this case to the fullest," said California Department of Fish and Game Lt. Kent Smirl. "We're hoping to file with the Los Angeles County district attorney next week."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The helicopter radio crackled, breaking the morning calm for the 15 men and one woman hidden in the canyon's spiny thickets. Pilot Brian Novak had spotted his quarry, a 100-pound mule deer, and told the ground crew to get ready. "I'll bring him down in two, three minutes," he radioed. Novak skillfully piloted his chopper over Orange County's rough backcountry terrain and guided the graceful animal, sprinting just ahead of the noisy aircraft, right into a nylon net.
NEWS
May 17, 2005 | Martin Griffith, Special to The Times
Mike Dobel is worried. A biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, Dobel charts mule deer populations in California and Nevada, and he doesn't like what he sees. Development running along the backside of the Sierra Nevada, a 300-mile section of U.S. 395 running between Bishop and Susanville, appears to have compromised the deer's habitat and may threaten the future of the herd. The problem is especially acute in and around Reno, where about 13,000 deer live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors voted Tuesday to back an ambitious mule deer tracking study intended to save the animals from destruction as a network of new highways crisscrosses their habitats in south and east Orange County. Armed with $190,000--$127,000 from the Transportation Corridor Agency and another $63,000 from the county--researchers will begin the next phase of their tracking and habitat study this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A remote camera snapped more than 350 high-quality images of mountain lion P-13 and her kittens as they fed on a mule deer over two nights in Malibu Creek State Park last week.  The cameras were set up to check on the male and female kittens, P-30 and P-28, who biologists haven't seen since they were tagged when they were about three weeks old, said biologist Jeff Sikich with the National Park Service. The kittens are now 10 months old, and though they have trackers that pinpoint their locations, Sikich said he was interested in how healthy they look.
OPINION
December 23, 2005
GO TO THE INTERNET SEARCH ENGINE of your choice. Type in "aggressive deer," oxymoronic though it sounds. Prepare to be amazed. Those soft-eyed creatures, who seemingly could do no greater harm than eating tulips, who look so sweet and startled as they graze by the roadside in family groups, are a scary bunch of mammals. This fall, five Californians were gored at their homes by deer. One, an elderly man in a suburb of San Diego, died. Helena, Mont.
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
Both deer hunters and big-game biologists will be studying results of next Saturday's opening day of the Eastern Sierra deer season to see if hunter success rates appear on the way up for the fourth straight year. Hunt zones X9 and X12, which include all of Mono County and part of Inyo County, has experienced a rising batting average in recent seasons. In 1982, 6% of the hunters in the zone bagged bucks. The success rate rose to 9% in 1983 and to 13% last season, when 1,689 bucks were taken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2005 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
On the balmy last day of fall, three white-rumped mule deer skittered around a rocky mountainside, then ranged free across the upper reaches of Santa Rosa Island. Not far away on a brushy slope, two tiny foxes with reddish-brown chests lounged side by side like housedogs, passing their afternoon inside a large chain-link cage. These inhabitants of Channel Islands National Park have vastly different origins.
OPINION
December 23, 2005
GO TO THE INTERNET SEARCH ENGINE of your choice. Type in "aggressive deer," oxymoronic though it sounds. Prepare to be amazed. Those soft-eyed creatures, who seemingly could do no greater harm than eating tulips, who look so sweet and startled as they graze by the roadside in family groups, are a scary bunch of mammals. This fall, five Californians were gored at their homes by deer. One, an elderly man in a suburb of San Diego, died. Helena, Mont.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
FINDING deer in our local mountains can be a tricky proposition -- even if you aren't hunting them in D-11 -- and spotting them from afar is an enticing reminder that a certain wildness coexists beside a sprawling metropolis. Mule deer -- so named because of their big floppy ears -- use local mountains for forage but don't move in large numbers -- due mostly to compromised habitat -- and they are elusive by nature.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | David Lukas
[ ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS ] Many Californians know autumn as the season when deer begin their courtship. By early October, the large bucks have sharpened their impressive racks of antlers and are dueling among themselves or guarding chosen females in preparation for mating.
NEWS
May 17, 2005 | Martin Griffith, Special to The Times
Mike Dobel is worried. A biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, Dobel charts mule deer populations in California and Nevada, and he doesn't like what he sees. Development running along the backside of the Sierra Nevada, a 300-mile section of U.S. 395 running between Bishop and Susanville, appears to have compromised the deer's habitat and may threaten the future of the herd. The problem is especially acute in and around Reno, where about 13,000 deer live.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | Ashley Powers
FOR A WORLD RECORD, THE ANTLERS UNDERWHELM: You expect more, somehow, than 43 points sprouting like witch's fingers from a clump of skull mounted on a tiny metal slab. It is a fine rack, the color of caramel-streaked dark chocolate, yet it hardly seems worthy of a custody battle that began decades ago in Canada and ends here on the cold, green floor of a trophy hunter's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
State wildlife officials on Friday said they were investigating the beheading of a deer, allegedly by an Avalon city employee who dressed the carcass and then left the head dangling in a soccer net near a preschool and City Hall. "We are investigating this case to the fullest," said California Department of Fish and Game Lt. Kent Smirl. "We're hoping to file with the Los Angeles County district attorney next week."
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | Leslie Carlson and Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writers
A developer's plan to bulldoze critical wildlife habitat and build dozens of homes in the Eastern Sierra has run into opposition from scientists, environmentalists, hunters and many local residents who say it will harm beleaguered herds of deer and bighorn sheep. Travelers along U.S. 395 can see big bucks, does and yearlings in Round Valley during winter, when deer migrate from the Sierra and congregate in lowland brush framed by snowy peaks 10 miles north of Bishop.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | Leslie Carlson and Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writers
A developer's plan to bulldoze critical wildlife habitat and build dozens of homes in the Eastern Sierra has run into opposition from scientists, environmentalists, hunters and many local residents who say it will harm beleaguered herds of deer and bighorn sheep. Travelers along U.S. 395 can see big bucks, does and yearlings in Round Valley during winter, when deer migrate from the Sierra and congregate in lowland brush framed by snowy peaks 10 miles north of Bishop.
NEWS
February 17, 2004 | Gary Polakovic
Western mule deer herds are in sharp decline, and scientists are working to overcome threats to reverse the trend. Just 40 years ago, an estimated 2.3 million mule deer roamed the West. In Nevada, deer populations have dropped 27% over the last decade, and other states are reporting declines. Mule deer are muscular critters with long ears similar to those of a mule.
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