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Multi Agency Graffiti Intervention Committee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | GEOFFREY BOUCHER
A coalition of Orange County groups battling graffiti will adopt both the name and strategy of a similar successful effort in Los Angeles. The coalition of law enforcement, public works, education and other agencies will call itself MAGIC: Multi-Agency Graffiti Intervention Committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | GEOFFREY BOUCHER
A coalition of Orange County groups battling graffiti will adopt both the name and strategy of a similar successful effort in Los Angeles. The coalition of law enforcement, public works, education and other agencies will call itself MAGIC: Multi-Agency Graffiti Intervention Committee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Los Angeles City Council members Joel Wachs and Laura Chick stepped up pressure on their colleagues Tuesday to increase the budget for graffiti removal and reconvene a Multi-Agency Graffiti Intervention Committee, citing an explosion of vandalism in the city. A week after Chick's Government Efficiency Committee recommended the budget be increased by $3.1 million to $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1993 | Researched and written by CHIP JOHNSON / Los Angeles Times
The graffiti war is being waged on many fronts, from private organizations to the state Capitol. The Epple bill, now in the Senate, takes ideas from a number of graffiti bills. The bill, AB 1179 by Assemblyman Bob Epple (D-Cerritos), provides a three-year prison sentence for taggers arrested three times and imposes stiff penalties for vandalizing public property.Taggers nabbed with chisels, drill bits and other tools used for etching could be fined $1,000 and sent to jail fr six months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1998 | AMY OAKES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vans roll out each morning at 7, seven days a week, their crews of court-referred laborers on a mission: to erase the graffiti on public and private property all through the San Fernando Valley. For these minor criminals clad in orange vests and ordered to perform community service, it's a daily grind where supply never seems to exceed demand.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violent crime may be down nationwide, but the petty variety plagues many small businesses, trapping them in an endless battle with vandals and vagrants and saddling them with costs they can ill afford, according to a survey conducted by The Times and USC's Marshall School of Business. Southern California business owners who responded to the survey said opening shop often means facing fresh graffiti, rousting the homeless from doorways or hosing down parking lots that double as toilets.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
In the campaign against graffiti, a reliable alarm clock and a willingness to beat the sunrise can be as important as a bucket of paint and a sturdy roller. "Graffiti should never see the light of day," said Patsy Carter of the 23rd Street Neighbors. The group, whose members live just north of USC, has achieved a measure of success in its battle against graffiti by waking up in the wee hours to paint over nocturnal scribblings.
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