Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMultiple Myeloma
IN THE NEWS

Multiple Myeloma

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A newly discovered herpes virus recently linked to Kaposi's sarcoma may also cause a deadly form of bone marrow cancer called multiple myeloma, researchers at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center reported today. Although it is rare in the public at large, the recently discovered virus is relatively common among people with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Geraldine A. Ferraro, the savvy New York Democrat who was embraced as a symbol of women's equality in 1984 when she became the first woman nominated for vice president by a major party, died Saturday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She was 75. The cause was complications from multiple myeloma, her family said. Ferraro was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, an incurable form of blood cancer, in 1998. She did not disclose her illness publicly until 2001, when she went on NBC's "Today" show and said she had beaten the cancer into remission with thalidomide, the once-banned drug that had proven effective with some end-stage cancers.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Geraldine A. Ferraro, the savvy New York Democrat who was embraced as a symbol of women's equality in 1984 when she became the first woman nominated for vice president by a major party, died Saturday at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She was 75. The cause was complications from multiple myeloma, her family said. Ferraro was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, an incurable form of blood cancer, in 1998. She did not disclose her illness publicly until 2001, when she went on NBC's "Today" show and said she had beaten the cancer into remission with thalidomide, the once-banned drug that had proven effective with some end-stage cancers.
NEWS
April 24, 2010
Threat to ‘South Park' creators: An article in Friday's Section A about the Comedy Central network's response to an online threat by radical Muslims made against "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone said a clip of an interview with Parker and Stone was posted on the website boingboing.com. The correct address for the site is boingboing.net. Domestic violence grant: The headline on a brief article in Thursday's LATExtra section said that the Los Angeles city attorney's office had received a $1.1-million federal grant to combat domestic violence.
OPINION
June 8, 2005
Re "Drug CEO's Business Becomes Personal," June 1: I read the article with my heart pounding, tears welling, eager to get to the end to see if, in fact, a viable treatment or cure has been found for multiple myeloma. My husband, Steve, had the exact journey as Richard Brewer -- same symptoms, same doctor at City of Hope, same stem cell treatment -- but his remission lasted only two years. He died in December 2003, five years after diagnosis. Kudos to Brewer and researcher Linda Higgins and her team for their perseverance and to Johnson & Johnson for picking up the ball.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000
Harold Crockett Pillsbury Jr., 77, a chemist who tested cigarettes for the Federal Trade Commission. Pillsbury directed the FTC's cigarette-testing laboratory from its inception after a landmark 1964 study by the surgeon general, which linked smoking to health problems, until it was closed by funding cuts in 1987. Pillsbury retired as an FTC chemist in 1989 after 25 years with the department.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Two insurance companies that refused to pay for an expensive new anti-cancer procedure today were ordered to reverse their positions immediately and allow treatment to begin in an attempt to save the life of a man with a fatal bone marrow malignancy. A federal judge rejected the arguments by Crum & Forster Organizations and Prudential Insurance Co. of America that the treatment is experimental. He ruled that the insurers, in refusing to pay for the treatment, had failed to abide by the language of their own policy.
HEALTH
August 16, 1999
The International Myeloma Foundation will hold an all-day seminar for patients and their families on Saturday at the Universal City Hilton and Towers. Multiple myeloma is a little-known, fatal cancer of the bone marrow that affects from 75,000 to 100,000 people in the U.S. With more than 13,500 new cases diagnosed each year, it is one of the fastest-growing types of cancer in the Western hemisphere.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | Sandy Banks
I fielded the phone call impatiently. Another earnest PR agent, trying to interest me in her client's concern. This one wanted me to write about cancer, the kind of cancer that killed Ann Landers, an under-the-radar variety that too few people know about, and too many people fear. I cut her off. Too busy, I told her. No one wants to read a column on disease. But she stopped me cold when she said the name: Multiple myeloma. That's the cancer that killed my mom.
NEWS
April 24, 2010
Threat to ‘South Park' creators: An article in Friday's Section A about the Comedy Central network's response to an online threat by radical Muslims made against "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone said a clip of an interview with Parker and Stone was posted on the website boingboing.com. The correct address for the site is boingboing.net. Domestic violence grant: The headline on a brief article in Thursday's LATExtra section said that the Los Angeles city attorney's office had received a $1.1-million federal grant to combat domestic violence.
OPINION
June 8, 2005
Re "Drug CEO's Business Becomes Personal," June 1: I read the article with my heart pounding, tears welling, eager to get to the end to see if, in fact, a viable treatment or cure has been found for multiple myeloma. My husband, Steve, had the exact journey as Richard Brewer -- same symptoms, same doctor at City of Hope, same stem cell treatment -- but his remission lasted only two years. He died in December 2003, five years after diagnosis. Kudos to Brewer and researcher Linda Higgins and her team for their perseverance and to Johnson & Johnson for picking up the ball.
HEALTH
October 21, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Most doctors used to think that the way to cure cancer was to attack it with every conceivable weapon. Now some are trying, instead, to disrupt the disease's environment. In a clinical trial completed earlier this year, a drug based on this approach helped prolong the lives of a majority of people with late-stage multiple myeloma, a deadly cancer that destroys bone tissue. The drug, Velcade, is known as a proteasome inhibitor.
NEWS
July 21, 2002 | Sandy Banks
I fielded the phone call impatiently. Another earnest PR agent, trying to interest me in her client's concern. This one wanted me to write about cancer, the kind of cancer that killed Ann Landers, an under-the-radar variety that too few people know about, and too many people fear. I cut her off. Too busy, I told her. No one wants to read a column on disease. But she stopped me cold when she said the name: Multiple myeloma. That's the cancer that killed my mom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000
Harold Crockett Pillsbury Jr., 77, a chemist who tested cigarettes for the Federal Trade Commission. Pillsbury directed the FTC's cigarette-testing laboratory from its inception after a landmark 1964 study by the surgeon general, which linked smoking to health problems, until it was closed by funding cuts in 1987. Pillsbury retired as an FTC chemist in 1989 after 25 years with the department.
HEALTH
May 29, 2000 | DENISE HAMILTON
Health spoke to Dr. Brian Durie, chairman of the board of the International Myeloma Foundation and director of the Myeloma Clinic at Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center. Question: Myeloma has been in the news a lot lately, especially in the sports world.
HEALTH
August 16, 1999
The International Myeloma Foundation will hold an all-day seminar for patients and their families on Saturday at the Universal City Hilton and Towers. Multiple myeloma is a little-known, fatal cancer of the bone marrow that affects from 75,000 to 100,000 people in the U.S. With more than 13,500 new cases diagnosed each year, it is one of the fastest-growing types of cancer in the Western hemisphere.
HEALTH
May 29, 2000 | DENISE HAMILTON
Health spoke to Dr. Brian Durie, chairman of the board of the International Myeloma Foundation and director of the Myeloma Clinic at Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center. Question: Myeloma has been in the news a lot lately, especially in the sports world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A newly discovered herpes virus recently linked to Kaposi's sarcoma may also cause a deadly form of bone marrow cancer called multiple myeloma, researchers at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center reported today. Although it is rare in the public at large, the recently discovered virus is relatively common among people with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|