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Multiple Sclerosis

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1993 | MIMI KO
The Super Cities Walk for Multiple Sclerosis will be held Sunday in Newport Beach, Brea and Huntington Beach. The 15-kilometer walk will take place in the three cities at the same time. At 8:30 a.m., walkers will take off from Newport Dunes in Newport Beach, Craig Park in Brea and Huntington State Beach in Huntington Beach in an effort to raise money for the Orange County chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985
Acomprehensive care center designed to assist victims of multiple sclerosis and their families was opened Saturday by officials of Valley Hospital Medical Center in Van Nuys. The center will provide medical and supportive psychosocial services to sufferers of the neurological disease that is most commonly diagnosed among young adults, hospital officials said. The cause of the disease is unknown and there is no known cure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998
UCLA researchers are recruiting people with multiple sclerosis to participate in a drug study, university officials said. Thalidomide will be used to see if it reduces the production of tumor necrosis factor, a substance made by white blood cells to fight infection that is overabundant in multiple sclerosis patients, said Sharon Craig, a research nurse with the Department of Neurology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
From ocean boardwalks to wilderness trails, thousands of people are expected to walk throughout Orange County this weekend to raise money for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Registration can be made in advance or on the morning of the walks at 7:30 a.m. All walks start at 8:30 a.m. The Saturday walk will be held at William R. Mason Regional Park in Irvine. The course's full length is 9.2 miles, although participants can walk shorter distances.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | From Times staff and wire reports
California researchers said Thursday that they have discovered one cause of multiple sclerosis, a finding that may lead to new therapies for the disease. MS afflicts an estimated 250,000 people in the United States. The disease forces the body's immune system to attack its central nervous system. It typically afflicts people between 20 and 40 years of age. Dr.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | Associated Press
The first drug to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but the maker of a competing medicine plans to ask a court to block its introduction. The FDA announced Friday that it will permit marketing of Avonex for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Avonex, made by Biogen Inc. in Cambridge, Mass., is the second approved MS drug that is based on interferon, one of the proteins produced by the immune system.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Using a technique developed through genetic engineering, a team of scientists from Stanford University, Columbia University and private industry has reversed a debilitating disease in mice that closely resembles multiple sclerosis. The results are so promising that the scientists hope to soon try the experimental treatment on human multiple sclerosis patients.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first drug to treat multiple sclerosis is likely to be approved within the month by the Food and Drug Administration, the agency said Monday. The drug, beta-interferon, was developed by Berlex Laboratories of Richmond, Calif., and will be manufactured by Chiron Corp of Emeryville, Calif. To be sold under the brand name Betaseron, it is the first drug designed to fight the disabling disease, which afflicts an estimated 350,000 Americans.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | from Associated Press
The first drug to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis instead of just treating its symptoms moved a step closer to market Monday. Scientific advisors unanimously urged the Food and Drug Administration to approve Biogen Inc.'s injectable drug Avonex to treat the incurable neurological disease. The recommendation was based on a study showing Avonex reduced MS progression by 37%. But the panel warned that no one yet knows how long Avonex works or what is the best dose.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | EMELYN CRUZ LAT
A new program has been set up to help uninsured and low-income people receive accurate diagnosis for multiple sclerosis. The Multiple Sclerosis Assn. of America will pay for magnetic resonance imaging exams for qualified patients. The MRI exam, which can detect brain lesions caused by multiple sclerosis, usually costs $400 to $750. Application forms for free exams are available by calling (800) 833-4672. Completed forms must be submitted to the association by the patient's neurologist.
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