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Mumbai Attacks

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November 29, 2008 | Richard Boudreaux, Boudreaux is a Times staff writer.
Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni said Friday that Israelis were deliberate targets of the well-organized bands of gunmen whose attacks across the Indian city of Mumbai included one on an ultra-Orthodox Jewish center. Officials receiving reports from Mumbai initially hesitated to judge whether the attack on the center owned by the group Chabad-Lubavitch, where gunmen seized hostages late Wednesday, was planned or random.
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WORLD
July 21, 2009 | Alex Rodriguez and Anshul Rana
The only suspected gunman still alive after last November's deadly attacks in Mumbai, India, who for months denied any involvement in the three-day siege, on Monday calmly told the judge at his murder trial, "Sir, I confess to all my crimes."
WORLD
November 30, 2008 | Josh Meyer and Sebastian Rotella, Meyer and Rotella are Times staff writers.
As investigators focused Saturday on whether the attacks in Mumbai, India, were the work of a militant group with a history of strikes on the country, the Pakistani government pledged to investigate any evidence of involvement by extremists based on its territory.
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October 3, 2009 | Bruce Wallace
Pakistan's foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, is on a public diplomacy tour of the United States, arguing that the Obama administration will lose credibility if it pulls back in its war against the Afghanistan insurgency. Qureshi insists that Pakistan's democratically elected government and its security establishment, which is often accused of links to extremists, are committed to fighting militants in their own country. But it wants the U.S. to provide more military resources to do the job. Qureshi spoke with Times Foreign Editor Bruce Wallace about the prospects for lowering regional tensions with India, about allegations that the Afghan Taliban is establishing itself in the Pakistani city of Quetta, and about the timetable for a government offensive against extremists in the South Waziristan region.
WORLD
June 3, 2009 | Alex Rodriguez and Mark Magnier
A Pakistani court Tuesday ordered the release of a firebrand Islamic cleric with alleged links to the attacks in the Indian city of Mumbai last year, sparking an angry rebuke from Indian officials that Pakistan is not committed to meting out justice for militants. Hafiz Saeed, head of a charity that international organizations have said is tied to the militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, had been held under house arrest since Dec. 11, though he had not been publicly charged or indicted.
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May 3, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The lone surviving member of the November 2008 attack in Mumbai that killed 166 people was convicted Monday on 86 counts, including murder, conspiracy and waging war against India, while two alleged Indian accomplices were acquitted. The guilty verdict against Pakistan national Ajmal Amir Kasab, 22, was expected. Kasab was seen by several witnesses and recorded on closed-circuit video attacking the Mumbai railway station with a serene smirk that prompted Indian media to dub him the "smiling assassin."
WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The lone surviving member of the November 2008 attack in Mumbai that killed 166 people was convicted Monday on 86 counts, including murder, conspiracy and waging war against India, while two alleged Indian accomplices were acquitted. The guilty verdict against Pakistan national Ajmal Amir Kasab, 22, was expected. Kasab was seen by several witnesses and recorded on closed-circuit video attacking the Mumbai railway station with a serene smirk on his face that prompted Indian media to dub him the "smiling assassin."
WORLD
March 9, 2009 | Mark Magnier
With prosecution deadlines looming, Interpol announced an agreement Sunday with Pakistan to aid an investigation into the masterminds behind November's militant attack in Mumbai, which killed more than 170 people. Ronald K. Noble, secretary-general of the France-based international security organization, also chided Indian officials for not being more forthcoming in helping their investigation of the deadly rampage in India's financial capital.
WORLD
July 15, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
India's home minister said Thursday that it was too early to blame any particular militant group or individual for the deadly blasts that struck Mumbai at rush hour a day earlier, but that the coordinated attack was the work of terrorists. He also defended the intelligence services' record in the run-up to the three explosions, adding that they had no information that an attack was coming. "Whoever planned this attack worked in a very, very clandestine manner," Palaniappan Chidambaram told reporters Thursday morning.
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April 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The first trial in November's Mumbai terrorist attacks was abruptly adjourned an hour after police pulled a large cloth off the head of the defendant to reveal the blinking, scruffy-bearded Pakistani who police say is the lone surviving gunman. The presiding judge ordered the much-anticipated proceedings delayed after dismissing the defense lawyer for suspect Ajmal Amir Kasab for a conflict of interest. Trial Judge M.L. Tahiliyani said legal aid lawyer Anjali Waghmare failed to disclose that she had agreed to represent a victim in a compensation claim case, who is also a witness against Kasab.
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