Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMumbai
IN THE NEWS

Mumbai

WORLD
December 15, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown offered Pakistan and India help fighting militants during a visit to the region aimed at easing tensions. Brown asked both countries to allow British police to question suspects in last month's attack in Mumbai, India. His visit coincided with a new spat between the neighbors. Pakistan said Indian warplanes had inadvertently violated its airspace. India denied any incursion.
Advertisement
FOOD
May 18, 2005
The origin of the lamb frankie is a bit different than suggested in your excellent article on Mumbai street foods ["Straight Off the Carts of Bombay," May 11]. Frankies were invented by entrepreneur Amarjit Tibb and were not named after the frankfurter, but after Frank Worrell, the famed cricketer and captain of the West Indies cricket team that was often pitted against India in the late 1950s. Sun-Ki Chai Honolulu
OPINION
March 21, 2011 | By Geetika Tandon Lizardi
Last pilot season NBC made a crazy move. It green-lighted an unlikely new sitcom set in a Mumbai call center. "Outsourced" was the hippest thing to happen to South Asians in the United States since Madonna discovered henna. As a writer, I was thrilled to hear about the show, not only because I'm an American of Indian descent but because I recently lived in Mumbai, helping my husband run a call center. Let's face it, if my agent couldn't get me an interview on this one, I might as well move back to Mumbai.
TRAVEL
October 9, 2005
I read Michael Stoops' advice on beggars' right to ask for money ["Close Encounters With Acute Poverty," Her World, Sept. 25] with some horror. It's very well-meaning advice for the United States but dangerous to beggars in India. According to my colleagues in Mumbai (Bombay), New Delhi and Calcutta, it's very helpful to buy packages of protein biscuits and oranges or bananas to distribute to beggars who will inevitably approach you in train stations and in the street. Many children, especially, have no other means to survive and little or no access to education.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Danish-born actress and filmmaker Dina Rosenmeier attempts to square her mother Jessie's seemingly obsessive need to aid the world's underprivileged children — while regularly leaving her own six kids back home — in the stirring, if inconclusive documentary "A Journey in My Mother's Footsteps. " Jessie Rosenmeier, 75 when this film was made, is dubbed here "The Mother Teresa of Modern Times" for her four-decade devotion to the welfare and international adoption of children in such countries as Kenya, Haiti, Korea and, especially, India.
WORLD
October 28, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Sushil Kumar's job entering data into a computer earns him $120 a month. His 50-year-old home is in serious need of repair. His family owes $8,500. But his life, so similar to the hardscrabble existence of fellow Indians, has taken a decidedly Bollywood turn for the better. The rags-to-riches story that unfolded in the 2008 Oscar-winning film "Slumdog Millionaire" came to life this week when the struggling government clerk from eastern India won $1 million on a TV game show.
WORLD
November 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
President Obama is beginning a lengthy trip to Asia with a visit to India, hoping that symbolism and charm rather than breakthrough agreements will be enough to illustrate the value Washington puts on the South Asian giant and its importance as a counterweight to China. Obama arrives in Mumbai at midday Saturday, just days after Republicans handed the Democrats a major setback in congressional elections. The administration is likely to try to frame the trip around jobs and exports, and the president will be accompanied by a 215-member business delegation that includes the chief executives of PepsiCo and McGraw Hill.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2010 | Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama's trip to Asia and South Asia has drawn unusual and apparently erroneous criticism that the visit will cost taxpayers $200 million a day. The apparent source of the figure is a Nov. 2 report by the Press Trust of India, a news agency that quoted a single, unnamed Indian official in Maharashtra state. No other news organization appears to have corroborated the figure. The White House does not discuss costs or security measures for presidential trips but said the numbers "have no basis in reality" and were "wildly inflated.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|