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May 18, 2005
The origin of the lamb frankie is a bit different than suggested in your excellent article on Mumbai street foods ["Straight Off the Carts of Bombay," May 11]. Frankies were invented by entrepreneur Amarjit Tibb and were not named after the frankfurter, but after Frank Worrell, the famed cricketer and captain of the West Indies cricket team that was often pitted against India in the late 1950s. Sun-Ki Chai Honolulu
October 9, 2005
I read Michael Stoops' advice on beggars' right to ask for money ["Close Encounters With Acute Poverty," Her World, Sept. 25] with some horror. It's very well-meaning advice for the United States but dangerous to beggars in India. According to my colleagues in Mumbai (Bombay), New Delhi and Calcutta, it's very helpful to buy packages of protein biscuits and oranges or bananas to distribute to beggars who will inevitably approach you in train stations and in the street. Many children, especially, have no other means to survive and little or no access to education.
November 11, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Danish-born actress and filmmaker Dina Rosenmeier attempts to square her mother Jessie's seemingly obsessive need to aid the world's underprivileged children — while regularly leaving her own six kids back home — in the stirring, if inconclusive documentary "A Journey in My Mother's Footsteps. " Jessie Rosenmeier, 75 when this film was made, is dubbed here "The Mother Teresa of Modern Times" for her four-decade devotion to the welfare and international adoption of children in such countries as Kenya, Haiti, Korea and, especially, India.
April 18, 2011 | Mark Magnier
It should have been Myleen and Jan Sjodin's greatest happiness. Their newborn was healthy, they were in exotic India and, following Myleen's uterine cancer, their surrogacy was successful. Instead, the Toronto couple claim, it all turned into a nightmare as the doctor hiked her fees just before the baby was born, hitting them at their psychologically weakest point. She also didn't pay outside hospital bills and tried to use India's infamous bureaucracy to delay their homecoming, the couple say. "We were robbed of our joy as first-time parents," Jan Sjodin said.
December 15, 2009 | By Jeff Coen and Josh Meyer
Two Chicago men accused of planning an attack on a Danish newspaper knew beforehand about the terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India, last year that killed nearly 170 people, federal investigators said Monday. In a conversation that investigators said they secretly recorded on a long car ride, U.S. authorities said the two men chatted about how they had known the terrorism rampage was about to begin in which 10 gunmen ran between hotels and other public places shooting people. During the ride, U.S. officials said, Tahawwur Rana asked David Coleman Headley to pass along congratulations to the planner of the attack, a leader of the militant Pakistani organization Lashkar-e-Taiba.
October 28, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Sushil Kumar's job entering data into a computer earns him $120 a month. His 50-year-old home is in serious need of repair. His family owes $8,500. But his life, so similar to the hardscrabble existence of fellow Indians, has taken a decidedly Bollywood turn for the better. The rags-to-riches story that unfolded in the 2008 Oscar-winning film "Slumdog Millionaire" came to life this week when the struggling government clerk from eastern India won $1 million on a TV game show.
November 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
President Obama is beginning a lengthy trip to Asia with a visit to India, hoping that symbolism and charm rather than breakthrough agreements will be enough to illustrate the value Washington puts on the South Asian giant and its importance as a counterweight to China. Obama arrives in Mumbai at midday Saturday, just days after Republicans handed the Democrats a major setback in congressional elections. The administration is likely to try to frame the trip around jobs and exports, and the president will be accompanied by a 215-member business delegation that includes the chief executives of PepsiCo and McGraw Hill.
November 6, 2010 | Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama's trip to Asia and South Asia has drawn unusual and apparently erroneous criticism that the visit will cost taxpayers $200 million a day. The apparent source of the figure is a Nov. 2 report by the Press Trust of India, a news agency that quoted a single, unnamed Indian official in Maharashtra state. No other news organization appears to have corroborated the figure. The White House does not discuss costs or security measures for presidential trips but said the numbers "have no basis in reality" and were "wildly inflated.
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