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July 1, 2010
Mummies of the World Where: California Science Center, 700 Exposition Park Drive, L.A. When: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily through Nov. 28. Closed Thanksgiving. Price: Adult $19.50; children 4-12 $12.50; seniors, students and children 13-17 $16.50. Contact: (213) 744-2019; http://www.mummiesoftheworld.com.
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WORLD
February 13, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- An archaeological team in Egypt has unearthed a rare find: an ornately carved, 3,600-year-old sarcophagus with a well-preserved mummy inside, the country's minister of antiquities said Thursday. The discovery came as welcome news for antiquities authorities, who have been struggling to protect and preserve Egypt's cultural treasures amid three years of nonstop political turmoil. Last month, Cairo's Museum of Islamic Art was badly damaged in a bombing, and poor security conditions have led to looting at sites across the country.
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SCIENCE
July 10, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An international team of archaeologists have discovered that two mummies found on an island off the coast of Scotland are, like Dr. Frankenstein's monster, composed of body parts from several different humans. The mummified remains, as much as 3,500 years old, suggest that the first residents of the island of South Uist in the Hebrides had some previously unsuspected burial practices. The West Coast of South Uist was densely populated from around 2000 BC until the end of the Viking period around AD 1300.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
As medical director of the MemorialCare Heart & Vascular Institute at Long Beach Memorial Hospital, preventive cardiologist Dr. Gregory Thomas counsels modern-day patients, urging them to eat right, exercise and quit smoking to keep their hearts healthy. But for the last five years or so, Thomas and a 19-member "dream team" of cardiologists, anthropologists and radiologists from all over the world have also been spending a lot of time focusing on a different set of patients, long-deceased: mummies.  Traveling from Egypt to Peru to the hallways of great American museums, they have been seeking permission to place the preserved bodies of ancient people in CT scanners to look for evidence of hardened arteries.  Their hope is to figure out why it is that so many people today develop the vascular blockages that lead to heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
January 27, 1993 | ROY RIVENBURG
Modern mummy activity isn't limited to Summum. Excessively bandaged creatures have also been lurking in college dorms, flunking drug tests and taking center stage at bizarre sadomasochistic parties, according to recent stories. In 1990, for example, a freshman at Wesleyan University in Connecticut was shocked to discover a 2,500-year-old Egyptian mummy lounging in his dorm bed--apparently placed there by a prankster who spirited it from a library attic.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Thanks to vaccination efforts, smallpox - killer of hundreds of millions people around the world over the course of the 20th century alone - was eradicated in 1979.  But even today the lethal variola virus, which causes the disease, is not completely impossible to come by. A team of French and Russian researchers recently found new snippets of smallpox DNA in 300-year-old mummies from Siberia, according to an article in the New England Journal...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Charles Burress, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Strange that no horror movie ever featured these creatures from the crypts of ancient Egypt — crocodile mummies. The toothy reptiles were embalmed and wrapped in worship of the crocodile god Sobek, and two painstakingly preserved 2,000-year-old specimens are now on display at UC Berkeley in an ancient Egypt exhibit that marks a sharp departure from touring King Tut spectacles. Berkeley's show at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is free, small and devoid of crowds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
A well-dressed miller from Hungary, a 6,500-year-old child found in Peru, a baby crocodile — these aren't your mother's mummies. You can see all three of them, along with more than 40 others, at the world premiere of "Mummies of the World," starting Thursday at the California Science Center. Don't worry, there are a few linen-wrapped Egyptian mummies too. But this exhibit isn't limited to one ancient civilization. Made up of specimens lent from 20 international institutions, it showcases the incredible variety of mummies, highlighting how they're created and all that can be learned from these relics of the past.
WORLD
August 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The mummy a British Egyptologist says could be the ancient Egyptian Queen Nefertiti is more likely a man, antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said in Cairo. Joann Fletcher, a mummification specialist from the University of York in England, said in June there was a "strong possibility" her team had unearthed Nefertiti from a Luxor tomb. But Hawass said, "I'm sure that this mummy is not a female." Among other things, he said, its hips were very narrow and Nefertiti gave birth six times.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Urumqi, China ? Almost invariably when visitors approach the middle-aged woman enshrined in a climatized exhibit case in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region Museum, they pause and do a double take. What gets the most attention is her nose: high-bridged, slightly hooked, the sort of nose that reminds you of Meryl Streep. Then a little gasp. " Weiguoren!" (A foreigner!), one young woman exclaimed to her friends. They were touring the museum earlier this month on a Chinese public holiday.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
People tend to think of heart disease as a scourge of modern life, brought on by vices such as greasy fast food, smoking and the tendency to be a couch potato. But 21st century CT scans of 137 antique mummies gathered from three continents show that hardened arteries have probably plagued mankind for thousands of years - even in places like the Aleutian Islands, where hunter-gatherers subsisted on a heart-healthy marine diet and occasional snacks of berries. Fully a third of the mummies examined - who lived in the American Southwest and Alaska as well as Egypt and Peru as much as 5,000 years ago - appeared to have the same vascular blockages that cause heart attacks and strokes in Americans today.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Thanks to vaccination efforts, smallpox - killer of hundreds of millions people around the world over the course of the 20th century alone - was eradicated in 1979.  But even today the lethal variola virus, which causes the disease, is not completely impossible to come by. A team of French and Russian researchers recently found new snippets of smallpox DNA in 300-year-old mummies from Siberia, according to an article in the New England Journal...
SCIENCE
July 27, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Studies of a 15-year-old Incan girl who was sacrificed on an Argentine mountaintop 500 years ago show that she had a lung infection when she died, most likely tuberculosis, researchers reported this week. Two younger children who died with her did not have an infection, they said. The mummy, known as the Maiden, was discovered in 1999 about 25 yards from the summit of Llullaiaco, a high-elevation volcano in the province of Salta, Argentina, by archaeologists led by Johan Reinhard and Constanza Ceruti of the Mountain Institute in Franklin, W.Va.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An international team of archaeologists have discovered that two mummies found on an island off the coast of Scotland are, like Dr. Frankenstein's monster, composed of body parts from several different humans. The mummified remains, as much as 3,500 years old, suggest that the first residents of the island of South Uist in the Hebrides had some previously unsuspected burial practices. The West Coast of South Uist was densely populated from around 2000 BC until the end of the Viking period around AD 1300.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
British Airways shared the above archival photo of a telegram from mother to daughter - but not just any mother and daughter. The mother was the onetime Lady Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon, whose husband was King George VI; the daughter was Elizabeth, who was on her way to a tour of Australia and New Zealand when she received news in Kenya of the death of the king, her father, on Feb. 6, 1952.   Here's what the telegram says: Address: “Her Majesty the Queen.” Text: “All my thoughts and prayers are with you. Mummie Buckingham Palace.” The message, says British Airways (BOAC, British Overseas Airways Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a B-movie actress in the 1940s, Elyse Knox was perhaps best known for the only horror film she ever made, "The Mummy's Tomb," with Lon Chaney Jr. as the monster who kidnaps her. She later recalled working through the night on the abduction and graveyard scenes with Chaney, miserable in heavy makeup and wearing a strap around his neck to help support her weight as he carried her. "After it was over, he thanked me for being petite," Knox...
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Peruvian mummy, on exhibit in a local museum for years as a specimen of an ancient infant, actually is the remains of a teen-ager or a young adult, a team of scientists said Friday. San Diego radiologist Hano A. Siegel said he and his colleagues asked the Museum of Man here if they could examine the contents of a Peruvian sarcophagus in mid-July and recently completed their findings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Kevin Jarre, a screenwriter steeped in American history who wrote the Civil War saga "Glory" and the western "Tombstone," died unexpectedly of heart failure April 3 at his Santa Monica home, said his aunt, Patty Briley Bean. He was 56. Jarre had been a self-described "Civil War freak" since childhood, when he received toy soldiers from the era for Christmas. His interest in the 54th Massachusetts, a regiment that was one of first black units during the Civil War, was piqued when a friend, Lincoln Kirstein, observed that a photograph of Jarre on horseback resembled a statue of Col. Robert Gould Shaw, the regiment's white leader.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
CT scans of Egyptian mummies show that many of them suffered from hardening of their arteries, researchers said Sunday. Cardiologists have generally believed that atherosclerosis is a byproduct of the modern lifestyle, caused by eating foods that are too high in fats, lack of exercise and smoking. The new findings indicate that "we may understand atherosclerosis less well than we think," Dr. Gregory S. Thomas, a cardiologist at UC Irvine, told a New Orleans meeting of the American College of Cardiology.
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