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September 11, 2002 | OLGA CONNOLLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"May joy and fellowship reign and, in this manner, may the Olympic torch pursue its way through the ages ... ," wrote Pierre de Coubertin in "Expression," a poetic reiteration of modern Olympic precepts that were to "pave the way for a more valiant humanity, stronger, and consequently more scrupulous and generous." To Coubertin, the Olympics were a meeting of nations, rather than entertainment for nations.
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July 6, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Jung-yoon Choi
Many Seoul residents, some with their faces colored the blue and red of the South Korean national flag, thrust their fists in the air and hugged strangers when word came that Pyeongchang, South Korea would host the 2018 Winter Olympics. In a landslide victory, Pyeongchang beat bids by Munich, Germany and Annecy, France. The South Korean town finished with 63 of a possible 95 votes. Munich garnered 25 and Annecy got seven. "It gave me goose bumps when I heard that we got it," said Jeong Shin-don, a white-collar worker in his 40s. "I'm beyond being excited.
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December 24, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Oh, to be in Munich. . . . The population of this stubbornly gemutlich yet quietly sophisticated city on the Isar numbers about 1.3 million. That makes it just a bit more crowded than metropolitan San Diego. Munich is proud of its beer and its Oktoberfest, and even prouder, perhaps, of its music. The Bavarian capital hosts three decent symphony orchestras. Chamber music is taken very seriously here, and international recitalists constantly parade through town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Gen. Nicolae Plesita, a die-hard communist and ruthless chief of the Securitate secret police who arranged shelter in Romania for terrorist Carlos the Jackal and was tried for the bombing of Radio Free Europe, has died. He was 80. Plesita died Monday in a Romanian Intelligence Service hospital in Bucharest, where he was being treated for various illnesses including diabetes, the Agerpres and Mediafax news agencies reported, citing family members. Plesita commanded the Securitate's foreign intelligence service from 1980 to 1984.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
MUNICH is an easy city to like: clean, bright and livable. It has world-class art museums, stylish shops, wide boulevards, parks and squares. Conviviality overflows in its fabled beer gardens, and its people have an open, animated air. Joachim von Halasz, a London-based financial analyst who often travels to Munich, knows well the attractions of this southern German city, including its towered and turreted Gothic revival Neues Rathaus, which the U.S.
SPORTS
August 26, 2002 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The terrorist in white hat and sunglasses, the one called Issa, steps onto the balcony and threatens to kill another hostage. This is what we recall. A girl named Olga smiles in a perfectly girlish way, in pigtails. A day before, she stood in tears but now she is triumphant, throwing her hands into the air to wave at the crowd. The memory endures.
SPORTS
September 5, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In awarding the Oscar for best documentary two years ago to "One Day in September," many Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters clearly sought to send a message--to revive interest in how and why the Palestinian terrorist attack on 11 Israelis at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games came to be, and in the sheer brutality of the way the Israelis were attacked, held hostage and, ultimately, died. Since then, the movie has been seen worldwide.
SPORTS
September 4, 2002
Spitz Wins 7th Gold Medal, Quits A seventh race, a seventh gold medal, a seventh world record. Mark Spitz, swimming the butterfly, anchored the 400-meter medley relay team to victory, giving him gold medals in three relays to go with those he won in four individual events. He announced immediately afterward that he was retiring. "All the way down that last lap, I kept saying, 'Just a few more strokes and it will be over.' I couldn't wait to get out of the pool."
SPORTS
September 5, 2002 | Randy Harvey
HEADLINES * Nine Olympic Hostages Die in Shootout In a blaze of gunfire and explosions at a military airport west of Munich, nine Israeli hostages, all members of the country's delegation to the Olympics, five Palestinian terrorists and a West German policeman died. The bloodbath came after West German police opened fire on the Arabs as they were in the process of transferring the hostages from helicopters to a waiting transport plane.
SPORTS
September 5, 2002 | Jim Murray
The late Jim Murray was in the athletes' village on Sept. 5, 1972. This was his column for The Times. MUNICH--I stood on a rooftop balcony on the Connollystrasse in the Olympic village Tuesday and witnessed an Olympic event Baron de Coubertin never dreamed of and the purpose of which is as arcane to me as the discus, the team foil, the hammer, individual epee, or Greco-Roman wrestling.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
MUNICH is an easy city to like: clean, bright and livable. It has world-class art museums, stylish shops, wide boulevards, parks and squares. Conviviality overflows in its fabled beer gardens, and its people have an open, animated air. Joachim von Halasz, a London-based financial analyst who often travels to Munich, knows well the attractions of this southern German city, including its towered and turreted Gothic revival Neues Rathaus, which the U.S.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002 | OLGA CONNOLLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"May joy and fellowship reign and, in this manner, may the Olympic torch pursue its way through the ages ... ," wrote Pierre de Coubertin in "Expression," a poetic reiteration of modern Olympic precepts that were to "pave the way for a more valiant humanity, stronger, and consequently more scrupulous and generous." To Coubertin, the Olympics were a meeting of nations, rather than entertainment for nations.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadly hostage-taking incident at the 1972 Olympic Summer Games left an indelible mark on this festive city's collective psyche and has come to symbolize the start of an era in which athletes, like political leaders, are regarded as fair game by extremists. But time and an ever-more-terrifying world have allowed the disturbing memories of that savage standoff 30 years ago to fade for many here, while the competition's highlights still burn bright.
SPORTS
September 10, 2002
HEADLINES * The Great Gold Robbery The long count came to basketball. With three seconds put back on the clock--not once, but twice--the Soviet Union finally scored the winning basket in a 51-50 victory over the United States that remains one of the most controversial games in Olympic history. It was the first loss for the United States since basketball became an Olympic sport in 1936. The U.S. players to this day have not accepted their silver medals. Shorter Wins Marathon; U.S.
SPORTS
September 10, 2002 | Mike Bresnahan
Frank Shorter won a gold medal at the Munich Olympics. The rest of the U.S. took it from there. In becoming the first American to win the Olympic marathon since 1908, Shorter sparked a fitness craze that spawned a stream of successful U.S. marathon runners. Shorter's victory in 1972 by nearly 2 1/2 minutes led to people of all professions pounding the pavement at 6 a.m., jogging in small packs or individually on the sides of city streets and rural roads.
SPORTS
September 7, 2002 | Peter Yoon
Matthews and Collett Booed on Victory Stand by Fans Vince Matthews of Brooklyn and Wayne Collett of Santa Monica were booed by the Olympic Stadium crowd for chatting and fidgeting instead of standing at attention on the victory stand during the national anthem. They had finished 1-2 in the 400 meters. Matthews denied any disrespect was intended. "If we wanted to protest, we could do a better job than that," he said. "People are trying to make something out of nothing." *--* HEADLINES *--* But U.
SPORTS
September 5, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after Munich, at the 1976 Summer Games in Montreal, the relatives of the 11 murdered Israelis began a campaign that so far has proved fruitless--requesting that the IOC honor the memory of the 11 dead at the Games with a moment of silence dedicated solely to the Israelis. Over the years, according to confidential minutes from IOC executive board meetings obtained by The Times, senior IOC delegates have made it plain they do not want to risk causing offense to Arab interests.
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