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December 24, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Oh, to be in Munich. . . . The population of this stubbornly gemutlich yet quietly sophisticated city on the Isar numbers about 1.3 million. That makes it just a bit more crowded than metropolitan San Diego. Munich is proud of its beer and its Oktoberfest, and even prouder, perhaps, of its music. The Bavarian capital hosts three decent symphony orchestras. Chamber music is taken very seriously here, and international recitalists constantly parade through town.
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SPORTS
July 6, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Jung-yoon Choi
Many Seoul residents, some with their faces colored the blue and red of the South Korean national flag, thrust their fists in the air and hugged strangers when word came that Pyeongchang, South Korea would host the 2018 Winter Olympics. In a landslide victory, Pyeongchang beat bids by Munich, Germany and Annecy, France. The South Korean town finished with 63 of a possible 95 votes. Munich garnered 25 and Annecy got seven. "It gave me goose bumps when I heard that we got it," said Jeong Shin-don, a white-collar worker in his 40s. "I'm beyond being excited.
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TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
MUNICH is an easy city to like: clean, bright and livable. It has world-class art museums, stylish shops, wide boulevards, parks and squares. Conviviality overflows in its fabled beer gardens, and its people have an open, animated air. Joachim von Halasz, a London-based financial analyst who often travels to Munich, knows well the attractions of this southern German city, including its towered and turreted Gothic revival Neues Rathaus, which the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Gen. Nicolae Plesita, a die-hard communist and ruthless chief of the Securitate secret police who arranged shelter in Romania for terrorist Carlos the Jackal and was tried for the bombing of Radio Free Europe, has died. He was 80. Plesita died Monday in a Romanian Intelligence Service hospital in Bucharest, where he was being treated for various illnesses including diabetes, the Agerpres and Mediafax news agencies reported, citing family members. Plesita commanded the Securitate's foreign intelligence service from 1980 to 1984.
SPORTS
September 5, 2002 | Randy Harvey
HEADLINES * Nine Olympic Hostages Die in Shootout In a blaze of gunfire and explosions at a military airport west of Munich, nine Israeli hostages, all members of the country's delegation to the Olympics, five Palestinian terrorists and a West German policeman died. The bloodbath came after West German police opened fire on the Arabs as they were in the process of transferring the hostages from helicopters to a waiting transport plane.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadly hostage-taking incident at the 1972 Olympic Summer Games left an indelible mark on this festive city's collective psyche and has come to symbolize the start of an era in which athletes, like political leaders, are regarded as fair game by extremists. But time and an ever-more-terrifying world have allowed the disturbing memories of that savage standoff 30 years ago to fade for many here, while the competition's highlights still burn bright.
SPORTS
July 6, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Jung-yoon Choi
Many Seoul residents, some with their faces colored the blue and red of the South Korean national flag, thrust their fists in the air and hugged strangers when word came that Pyeongchang, South Korea would host the 2018 Winter Olympics. In a landslide victory, Pyeongchang beat bids by Munich, Germany and Annecy, France. The South Korean town finished with 63 of a possible 95 votes. Munich garnered 25 and Annecy got seven. "It gave me goose bumps when I heard that we got it," said Jeong Shin-don, a white-collar worker in his 40s. "I'm beyond being excited.
TRAVEL
May 9, 1993 | LUCY IZON
It might not be everyone's ideal type of accommodation, but this summer the city of Munich will again provide lodging for young visitors--in a 400-person tent on the outskirts of the city--for 7 German marks (about $4.60 U.S.) per night. From June 30 to Aug. 31, the tent will be open daily, 5 p.m.-9 a.m., and officials expect about 20,000 young travelers to make use of it. Guests are provided with blankets and mattresses, and hot tea in the morning.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Michael Jackson is the $20-million corporate spokesman who won't speak. "Protect me. . . . Don't let them ask me any questions," Jackson whispered Wednesday morning to a top executive from L.A. Gear, moments after the enigmatic pop star told a Hollywood Palladium full of reporters that he was "very happy" to be a part of the L.A. Gear team. By next spring, Jackson will be starring in L.A. Gear commercials. In the meantime he will help design and market a new line of L.A. Gear shoes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
Gen. Nicolae Plesita, a die-hard communist and ruthless chief of the Securitate secret police who arranged shelter in Romania for terrorist Carlos the Jackal and was tried for the bombing of Radio Free Europe, has died. He was 80. Plesita died Monday in a Romanian Intelligence Service hospital in Bucharest, where he was being treated for various illnesses including diabetes, the Agerpres and Mediafax news agencies reported, citing family members. Plesita commanded the Securitate's foreign intelligence service from 1980 to 1984.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
MUNICH is an easy city to like: clean, bright and livable. It has world-class art museums, stylish shops, wide boulevards, parks and squares. Conviviality overflows in its fabled beer gardens, and its people have an open, animated air. Joachim von Halasz, a London-based financial analyst who often travels to Munich, knows well the attractions of this southern German city, including its towered and turreted Gothic revival Neues Rathaus, which the U.S.
SPORTS
September 11, 2002 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadly hostage-taking incident at the 1972 Olympic Summer Games left an indelible mark on this festive city's collective psyche and has come to symbolize the start of an era in which athletes, like political leaders, are regarded as fair game by extremists. But time and an ever-more-terrifying world have allowed the disturbing memories of that savage standoff 30 years ago to fade for many here, while the competition's highlights still burn bright.
SPORTS
September 9, 2002 | Lance Pugmire
HEADLINES * USC's Williams Leaps 27-0 1/2 to Win Long Jump Randy Williams, a 19-year-old USC freshman from Compton, ended a 48-hour gold-medal drought for the U.S. track and field team with a victory in the long jump. He jumped 27 feet 1/2 inch, then credited a teddy bear that a girlfriend had given him for good luck. Still, the U.S. failed to win the men's shotput for the first time since 1936, George Woods finishing second to Poland's Wladyslaw Komar.
TRAVEL
May 9, 1993 | LUCY IZON
It might not be everyone's ideal type of accommodation, but this summer the city of Munich will again provide lodging for young visitors--in a 400-person tent on the outskirts of the city--for 7 German marks (about $4.60 U.S.) per night. From June 30 to Aug. 31, the tent will be open daily, 5 p.m.-9 a.m., and officials expect about 20,000 young travelers to make use of it. Guests are provided with blankets and mattresses, and hot tea in the morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Oh, to be in Munich. . . . The population of this stubbornly gemutlich yet quietly sophisticated city on the Isar numbers about 1.3 million. That makes it just a bit more crowded than metropolitan San Diego. Munich is proud of its beer and its Oktoberfest, and even prouder, perhaps, of its music. The Bavarian capital hosts three decent symphony orchestras. Chamber music is taken very seriously here, and international recitalists constantly parade through town.
SPORTS
October 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Toronto has replaced Belgrade as host of the 1994 World Championships, the international basketball federation announced at Munich, Germany.
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