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NEWS
October 21, 1993
Residents and builders who do business with the city will have to pay more to get it done. The City Council unanimously agreed recently to raise fees for 74 municipal services, from reviewing building plans to copying documents. The city also will add new fees. Council members will review the proposed fee increases one more time Nov. 1. If final approval is given, the increases will become effective Jan. 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2011 | By Joseph SernaLos Angeles Times
Barred by the courts from slashing its payroll by outsourcing city jobs to private companies, Costa Mesa is now exploring forming partnerships with neighboring cities to share municipal services. City officials said they are looking into sharing such things as police SWAT teams, emergency dispatch operations and animal control. Costa Mesa has become a flash point in California in the debate over government finances for its plan to reduce expenses and pension costs by cutting more than 200 workers, a drastic proposal that has caught the attention of political and labor interests throughout the state.
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NEWS
November 7, 1993 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was as if dollars had fallen from the heavens when the California Legislature allowed Long Beach to use money from its wealthy Harbor Department to make up for losses in state funding. But now harbor officials, backed by an opinion from state legal experts, say City Hall misinterpreted the law and took too much money. As a result, the city may not receive more than $12 million it had counted on this year to help pay for services including police and fire protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2010 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Maywood, whose political marriage to the city of Bell made national headlines, is considering a quickie divorce. In late June, Maywood fired most of its workers and turned over operations to its neighbor city. But the scandal over eye-popping salaries in Bell has become a "distraction" and Maywood leaders say they may look for someone else to run their affairs. "We're caught in a situation where we need to move forward," said Maywood Councilman Felipe Aguirre. "We don't want to be distracted by things that are not germane to our city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
The city has appointed a full-time staff member to concentrate on enforcing ocean water quality ordinances and educate the public about the regulations. Michael Phillips, a community service officer in the Fire Department for four years, will serve as an environmental specialist in the Municipal Services Department, a newly created position. His job will include citing people for littering, washing down kitchen mats into public drains and dumping hazardous waste into storm drains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City officials say residents have a clear-cut choice: vote for a higher surcharge on utility bills or cope with cuts in municipal services such as public works projects and police protection. Buena Park is beginning fiscal 1996-97 with a budget deficit, and "this is not a one-time blip, this is a structural problem," Councilman Donald L. Bone said. "There is no easy answer. We either raise revenues or cut costs. Either one will impact residents."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
At the risk of asking whether the emperor is wearing any clothes, perhaps Irvine Mayor Michael Ward or City Manager Paul O. Brady Jr. would be kind enough to tell Irvine residents precisely how it will be possible to cut 50 full-time and 20 part-time staff positions, continue to "reduce the cost of doing business in Irvine," and yet still "provide the same level of service citizens have come to rely on" from city government. Such a miracle must also be accomplished as the city continues to grow, increasing demands for municipal services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2011 | By Joseph SernaLos Angeles Times
Barred by the courts from slashing its payroll by outsourcing city jobs to private companies, Costa Mesa is now exploring forming partnerships with neighboring cities to share municipal services. City officials said they are looking into sharing such things as police SWAT teams, emergency dispatch operations and animal control. Costa Mesa has become a flash point in California in the debate over government finances for its plan to reduce expenses and pension costs by cutting more than 200 workers, a drastic proposal that has caught the attention of political and labor interests throughout the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | GREG RIPPEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bringing two months of haggling to an uneasy conclusion, the City Council has reluctantly approved a $331-million budget that includes fee increases, reduced municipal services and the loss of some temporary jobs. The council, which raced the clock to trim a $6.1-million budget shortfall before July 1, voted 4 to 1 Tuesday night, with Councilwoman Ginger Bremberg dissenting, on a budget that includes $494,000 in increased city fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1996
Flying in the face of a state order, officials at the Los Angeles Port poured $20 million into city coffers last week to pay for municipal services performed on its property. The payment is the second $20-million transfer made by port officials, who said a private analysis of their finances had found that the Harbor Commission owed the city a total of $80 million in old and current fees for such services as parks construction on port property and police and fire protection.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2006 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Internet service provider EarthLink Inc. expects to launch its first municipal wireless system today, with high-speed connections in six square miles of downtown Anaheim. The Orange County city is key to EarthLink's strategy as it adapts to changing online habits and the evaporation of its dial-up business. Anaheim is the biggest city so far to embrace a nationwide trend of creating citywide wireless Internet access for residents and businesses.
OPINION
December 3, 2005
Your Nov. 23 editorial "Making connections" characterized municipal broadband Internet service as a "utopian-sounding promise" and implied that local governments are unfit to provide such services. High-speed broadband is not a utopian dream. In Belgium, Canada, Finland, South Korea and Taiwan, high-speed broadband already far exceeds the United States in penetration and speed, and often at half the price or less. Broadband service makes the new economy possible, creating new high-wage jobs, educational opportunity and investment galore.
WORLD
December 22, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
It began as a pro-Saddam Hussein march in the capital's Adhamiya district and turned into a raging gun battle with U.S. armored units surrounding a dozen fighters. When the smoke cleared, seven Iraqis lay dead. A week after the bloody exchange, the bitterness left behind in this northwest Baghdad neighborhood with strong ties to Hussein and his Sunni sect illustrates the challenges facing the U.S.-led coalition, even with the former dictator behind bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Moving to fulfill a campaign promise to decentralize city government, Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn on Monday will dedicate six new neighborhood city halls that are intended to give residents easier access to municipal services. Some of the buildings are existing municipal offices getting a new designation and an increase in city staff. Two will be new buildings, including the Marvin Braude Constituent Service Center in Van Nuys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2002 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Generous retirement plans for California public employees, approved during the 1990s stock boom, now threaten to burden state and local governments with huge new debts as the stock market declines. In 1999 and 2001, Gov. Gray Davis signed legislation--backed by unions for police officers, firefighters and other public employees--that allowed local governments to negotiate pension increases of up to 50%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
The city has appointed a full-time staff member to concentrate on enforcing ocean water quality ordinances and educate the public about the regulations. Michael Phillips, a community service officer in the Fire Department for four years, will serve as an environmental specialist in the Municipal Services Department, a newly created position. His job will include citing people for littering, washing down kitchen mats into public drains and dumping hazardous waste into storm drains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992
During 1992, many Orange County residents wrote about their thoughts and feelings in articles for Orange County opinion pages. As we look back on the year, some of those thoughts are recalled in these excerpts. Last year's state budget disaster left cities statewide with more than $400 million less for municipal services such as police, fire, public works and recreation programs.
NEWS
October 27, 1994
Contrary to what was presented in your coverage (Oct. 20) of the seven municipalities fighting for lower electric rates from Southern California Edison Co., the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power does pay property taxes in the counties of Los Angeles, Inyo, Mono, Riverside and San Bernardino, as well as in Nevada and Arizona. It does not pay taxes for properties owned within the city of Los Angeles. However, the DWP does support municipal services through a traditional 5% transfer of its gross revenues to the city's general fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999
First, I want to congratulate Mayor Richard Riordan on his charter amendment victory (June 9). I voted against it. It will now permit a mayor to legally do what the scandalously corrupt Frank Shaw machine did illegally. I appeared before the charter committee and suggested a series of changes that needed to be made to benefit the taxpayers of Los Angeles. None were adopted or even mentioned in news stories. The real problem is not only the financial burden imposed on L.A. residents by the mayor and City Council, it is also the financial burden placed on city residents by Los Angeles County when it provides municipal services at less than cost to most cities in the county, especially the "contract cities."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | GREG RIPPEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bringing two months of haggling to an uneasy conclusion, the City Council has reluctantly approved a $331-million budget that includes fee increases, reduced municipal services and the loss of some temporary jobs. The council, which raced the clock to trim a $6.1-million budget shortfall before July 1, voted 4 to 1 Tuesday night, with Councilwoman Ginger Bremberg dissenting, on a budget that includes $494,000 in increased city fees.
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