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Murder Capital

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NEWS
August 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Homicides are claiming an average 60 victims a day in Colombia, a country of 29 million, where drug wars and political violence have pushed the nation's murder rate to the highest level in the world, police said Wednesday.
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NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
When voters in Honduras head to the polls Sunday to elect a new president, they will undoubtedly ask themselves one question: Who can restore security and justice to a nation beset by violence? It's an important question given that Honduras has the highest homicide rate in the world, with more than 91 people killed for every 100,000 inhabitants, according to a 2011 United Nations report. The global average of homicides per 100,000 is about eight, according to the Washington Office on Latin America.
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NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
When voters in Honduras head to the polls Sunday to elect a new president, they will undoubtedly ask themselves one question: Who can restore security and justice to a nation beset by violence? It's an important question given that Honduras has the highest homicide rate in the world, with more than 91 people killed for every 100,000 inhabitants, according to a 2011 United Nations report. The global average of homicides per 100,000 is about eight, according to the Washington Office on Latin America.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012
This can't be correct: Cloris Leachman and Tara Reid topline a period horror-thriller about a young boy who becomes convinced the Manson family has moved into the cornfield in back of his house? And it's not some mad parody but, rather, an earnest effort, which makes it even more weird. The absolute best part of "The Fields" is simply that, letting the very idea of this cast and this story marinate in the brainpan for a moment before coming to the obvious common-sense conclusion: This cannot possibly work out. And indeed the film, directed by Tom Mattera and David Mazzoni from a screenplay by B. Harrison Smith, is flat and lifeless, not even the odd object promised by its unlikely cast, who play it straight and with little energy.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | Associated Press
Florida's Dade County, which surrounds the Miami metropolitan area, was the nation's murder capital in 1984, according to FBI statistics released Saturday. The county's homicide rate increased to three times the national figure, the FBI said. The figures showed that Dade County has 23.7 homicides per 100,000 population, surpassing all other major metropolitan areas. The nationwide rate was 7.9 murders per 100,000 persons.
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The District of Columbia spent $859 per person for criminal and civil justice--four times the national average--the year it became the nation's murder capital, according to a Justice Department report. Washington assumed the unofficial title as the nation's murder capital in 1988 when it recorded 369 homicides, highest per capita for any major U.S. city.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | Reuters
The mayor of this former steelmaking center said Monday that Gary had earned the unenviable title of U.S. murder capital. "It's the result of too many guns, too many drugs and not enough jobs," Gary Mayor Thomas Barnes said at a news conference. Barnes also blamed a shortage of police for the lawlessness in this city of 120,000, a few miles from Chicago. A record 110 murders were committed in Gary last year, computing to a nationwide high of 91 murders per 100,000 residents.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | Associated Press
Washington again ended a year as the leading contender for the title of America's murder capital, with 487 homicides recorded in 1991, four more than the 483 reported in 1990. The last homicide of the year was an unidentified male who was shot about 8:20 a.m. Tuesday, police said. The new year started off with four killings in the first four hours.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | From United Press International
The number of murders in the nation's capital this year passed the 300 mark Tuesday after a night of street violence fueled by drug warfare, District of Columbia police said. One man was stabbed to death Monday night, and two more died in shootings Tuesday morning, raising the 1989 city homicide toll to 301 victims. At least one of the three most recent killings was drug-related, police said.
OPINION
December 23, 2002
Re "No Break for City's Gun Dealers," Dec. 19: Outrageous! I second the plea for information on where the money from the 1,000% increase in police-permit fees is going. L.A. City Councilman Jack Weiss and his compatriots must be idiots. According to the article, "He said the fees are needed to ensure firearms dealers follow the law." So crime prevention is their goal? Then perhaps this wise City Council should assess similar fees on the muggers, rapists and murderers who flock to this "murder capital" for its easy pickings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012
Although "8 Murders a Day," Charlie Minn's disturbing documentary about the ultra-violent drug war in Juarez, Mexico, is somewhat repetitive and not terribly well-organized, it shines an important light on what the filmmaker deems "the greatest human rights disaster in the world today. " Aided by vivid archival news clips, you-are-there footage from the so-called "murder capital of the world" (Juarez saw more than 3,000 homicides in 2010 alone, hence the movie's title) and frank interviews with academics, reporters and first-hand observers, Minn lays blame for the border city's anguish largely on Felipe Calderon who, after being elected Mexico's president in 2006, waged what became a failed — and, some say, disingenuous — fight against Juarez's competing drug cartels.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
Although "8 Murders a Day," Charlie Minn's disturbing documentary about the ultra-violent drug war in Juarez, Mexico, is somewhat repetitive and not terribly well-organized, it shines an important light on what the filmmaker deems "the greatest human rights disaster in the world today. " Aided by vivid archival news clips, you-are-there footage from the so-called "murder capital of the world" (Juarez saw more than 3,000 homicides in 2010 alone, hence the movie's title) and frank interviews with academics, reporters and first-hand observers, Minn lays blame for the border city's anguish largely on Felipe Calderon who, after being elected Mexico's president in 2006, waged what became a failed — and, some say, disingenuous — fight against Juarez's competing drug cartels.
OPINION
January 24, 2003
Re "Battle Looms Over Prison Spending in State Budget," Jan. 22: Gov. Gray Davis' decision to decrease school and other program budgets while increasing the prison budget once again shows the short-term mentality of our politicians. Building prisons might help crime rates in the immediate short term, but when sacrificed against spending for schools, after-school programs and other programs this only ensures that we will have to build more prisons in the long term. Is it any surprise that the prison guards union favors such state budgeting?
OPINION
December 23, 2002
Re "No Break for City's Gun Dealers," Dec. 19: Outrageous! I second the plea for information on where the money from the 1,000% increase in police-permit fees is going. L.A. City Councilman Jack Weiss and his compatriots must be idiots. According to the article, "He said the fees are needed to ensure firearms dealers follow the law." So crime prevention is their goal? Then perhaps this wise City Council should assess similar fees on the muggers, rapists and murderers who flock to this "murder capital" for its easy pickings.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a middle-aged man with thinning hair and a bit of a paunch, strapped to a reclining dentist chair. An eagle feather lay on his chest. He barely moved. His eyes were shut. So quiet were Darrell Keith Rich's final moments that his passage from life to death was imperceptible to witnesses. It was a striking contrast to the summer of rage that had led him to San Quentin's execution chamber, a seemingly peaceful end for a man who had killed brutally and repeatedly during two months of 1978.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | RUBEN CASTANEDA, THE WASHINGTON POST
The number of people slain in the District of Columbia dropped 11% this year, the largest reduction in homicides since the mid-1980s, when the widespread advent of crack unleashed a seemingly unrelenting tide of violence in the eastern half of the city. As of Friday, 414 people had been slain in the city in 1994, down from the 467 homicides that occurred in 1993. The year ended with 780 nonfatal shootings, a reduction of 14% from the previous year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
Although "8 Murders a Day," Charlie Minn's disturbing documentary about the ultra-violent drug war in Juarez, Mexico, is somewhat repetitive and not terribly well-organized, it shines an important light on what the filmmaker deems "the greatest human rights disaster in the world today. " Aided by vivid archival news clips, you-are-there footage from the so-called "murder capital of the world" (Juarez saw more than 3,000 homicides in 2010 alone, hence the movie's title) and frank interviews with academics, reporters and first-hand observers, Minn lays blame for the border city's anguish largely on Felipe Calderon who, after being elected Mexico's president in 2006, waged what became a failed — and, some say, disingenuous — fight against Juarez's competing drug cartels.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | from United Press International
The District of Columbia began putting more police on street patrol today to combat drug-related violence that has made this the nation's "murder capital." Under a crime emergency directive from Police Chief Maurice Turner, about 400 officers will leave their desk duties to walk a beat one or two days a week. At City Hall, numerous other measures being considered range from calling in the National Guard to tightening the district's already strict gun laws to adding 700 officers to the force.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | RON LESKO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When your decaying hometown is known as the deadliest place in an increasingly dangerous nation, what do you say in its defense? You can point to the past, to the nostalgic "Gary, Indiana, my home, sweet home" from "The Music Man." You can point to the future, and hopes that riverboat gambling will end two decades of socioeconomic free fall. Or, as many longtime residents do, you can shrug your shoulders. No one denies that Gary has the highest murder rate in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1994
Scott Harris makes the statement (Jan. 11) that "I've yet to hear a good argument against stronger firearms regulations." How about this one: Firearms regulations have no effect on violent crime except to exacerbate the problem by diverting precious police and judicial resources from real crime as opposed to potential crime. And what about this: Without exception, every city in the United States with the strictest firearms laws has a higher rate of violent crime than the cities with fewer gun laws.
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