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Murder Suicides San Francisco

NEWS
July 10, 1993 | From the Associated Press
City officials on Friday blamed equipment overload, a shift change and the absence of a fail-safe emergency computer system for the 4 minutes and 4 seconds it took to send police to last week's high-rise shooting. A faster response time probably would not have prevented the deaths of eight people and the injury of six others, authorities said.
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NEWS
July 7, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the bloodstains washed away and the bullet holes repaired, employees of the Pettit & Martin law firm returned to work Tuesday for the first time since last week's high-rise shooting and immediately began pushing for stricter gun control laws. An impromptu memorial with dozens of flowers and cards greeted employees outside the 48-story office tower at 101 California St. A team of four counselors was on hand to help the lawyers and staff members cope with their return to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1993
Searches of the Woodland Hills home and office of the gunman who killed eight people last week in a San Francisco high-rise office provided detectives with conflicting views of the killer but no clue to his motivation, the lead investigator said Thursday.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN and PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lugging a black canvas satchel full of ammunition, handguns and a police scanner, a man roamed through four floors of a high-rise building in the financial district Thursday spraying bullets as he went, killing eight people and wounding six others before shooting himself to death as police moved in, officials and witnesses said. Firing "in six-bullet bursts" from two 9-millimeter pistols and a .
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | PETER H. KING
There's not much about what happened last week at 101 California Street, a sparkling skyscraper in the center of this city's financial district, that can be described as novel. Yes, the details were different, but mainly this was a movie that has played many, many times before and by now everyone in the audience should be able to predict all the plot twists and recite, even before they're spoken, all the key lines. It opens, of course, with a madman.
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