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Murders Michigan

NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
One of the youngest murder defendants in U.S. history was convicted of second-degree murder Tuesday for shooting a stranger outside a convenience store with a rifle when he was 11. In a case that stirred fierce debate over how to treat young offenders, Nathaniel Abraham, 13, sat expressionless and looked straight ahead as the jury announced its verdict after 18 hours of deliberations over four days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
They're dramatic, they're theatrical, and running them generally stinks. Is anyone else repulsed by TV newscasts gratuitously using 911 calls as centerpieces of titillation? Obviously so, judging from the anger of some viewers objecting to newscasts all across the TV landscape--from local stations to national networks--deploying "Star Trek" hero William Shatner's frantic Aug.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who killed a gay acquaintance who had revealed a crush on him during a "Jenny Jones Show" taping was convicted of murder Thursday for the second time in a case that threw a spotlight on daytime TV's titillating fare. The jury rejected the crime-of-passion defense of Jonathan Schmitz who, three days after the taping in 1995, shot Scott Amedure at his trailer home and then called police and confessed. Schmitz, 29, could get life in prison at sentencing Sept. 14.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who killed a gay acquaintance in 1995 after the victim revealed a crush on him during a talk show taping went to trial in Pontiac, Mich., for the second time. The defense lawyer for Jonathan Schmitz said the gay man, Scott Amedure, was to blame because he pursued his client to the point that Schmitz "lost it" after the taping of "The Jenny Jones Show." Schmitz was convicted of second-degree murder in 1996 and sentenced to 25 to 50 years in prison.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A lawyer for Dr. Jack Kevorkian asked a judge to throw out his murder conviction, saying he had bad legal advice--even though Kevorkian defended himself at his trial. Lawyer Mayer Morganroth blamed Kevorkian's lawyer, David Gorosh, for "ineffective assistance of counsel." Morganroth alleged that Kevorkian acted as his own attorney out of frustration over the way Gorosh was handling the defense, the Oakland Press of Pontiac, Mich., reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
First the verdict, now the spin. The rutabaga on the screen is Jenny Jones, her eyes sparkless, her face as vacant as a turnip. There's no evidence of guile, nor even a glimmer of fakery as she says to Katie Couric with the sincerity of a true believer, her pale suit, blouse, skin and hair bleeding together reassuringly like pastels in a muted still-life: "I defend the right to have gay people on the show." With equal innocence, she adds later: "This is about homophobia." Say what?
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A jury in Michigan returned a $25-million civil judgment against the "Jenny Jones" show on Friday, a stinging indictment of the "trash TV" genre that could have a chilling effect on a wide variety of TV programs, say television producers and executives.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | From Reuters
A lawyer for the family of a slain gay man who is suing the producers of the "Jenny Jones" talk show made an emotional plea Wednesday for a $71-million judgment in the lawsuit, expected to go to the jury today. Attorney Geoffrey Fieger, who accused the show of driving a Michigan man to murder his gay admirer by humiliating him in an episode about same-sex secret crushes, raised his damage demands from $50 million in closing arguments in the wrongful death case.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several American newspapers and television networks called this week's mass killing in Littleton, Colo., "the worst U.S. school massacre." The people of Bath, Mich., a small farming town just outside Lansing, know differently. On the sun-drenched morning of May 18, 1927, 45 people--including 38 children--where killed when an embittered school board official set off a series of bombs inside the town's three-story brick schoolhouse. That horrific attack has been called the bloodiest ever on a U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years, five trials, 130 assisted suicides and finally a murder conviction, former pathologist Jack Kevorkian was sentenced to 10 to 25 years in prison Tuesday and, smiling sadly, led in handcuffs from the courtroom. "You said you invited yourself here to make a final stand," Oakland County Circuit Judge Jessica Cooper said sternly before meting out the sentence prosecutors had sought. "You invited yourself to the wrong forum."
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