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Murders Michigan

NEWS
August 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who killed a gay acquaintance who had revealed a crush on him during a "Jenny Jones Show" taping was convicted of murder Thursday for the second time in a case that threw a spotlight on daytime TV's titillating fare. The jury rejected the crime-of-passion defense of Jonathan Schmitz who, three days after the taping in 1995, shot Scott Amedure at his trailer home and then called police and confessed. Schmitz, 29, could get life in prison at sentencing Sept. 14.
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NEWS
August 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who killed a gay acquaintance in 1995 after the victim revealed a crush on him during a talk show taping went to trial in Pontiac, Mich., for the second time. The defense lawyer for Jonathan Schmitz said the gay man, Scott Amedure, was to blame because he pursued his client to the point that Schmitz "lost it" after the taping of "The Jenny Jones Show." Schmitz was convicted of second-degree murder in 1996 and sentenced to 25 to 50 years in prison.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A lawyer for Dr. Jack Kevorkian asked a judge to throw out his murder conviction, saying he had bad legal advice--even though Kevorkian defended himself at his trial. Lawyer Mayer Morganroth blamed Kevorkian's lawyer, David Gorosh, for "ineffective assistance of counsel." Morganroth alleged that Kevorkian acted as his own attorney out of frustration over the way Gorosh was handling the defense, the Oakland Press of Pontiac, Mich., reported.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A jury in Michigan returned a $25-million civil judgment against the "Jenny Jones" show on Friday, a stinging indictment of the "trash TV" genre that could have a chilling effect on a wide variety of TV programs, say television producers and executives.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | From Reuters
A lawyer for the family of a slain gay man who is suing the producers of the "Jenny Jones" talk show made an emotional plea Wednesday for a $71-million judgment in the lawsuit, expected to go to the jury today. Attorney Geoffrey Fieger, who accused the show of driving a Michigan man to murder his gay admirer by humiliating him in an episode about same-sex secret crushes, raised his damage demands from $50 million in closing arguments in the wrongful death case.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nine years, five trials, 130 assisted suicides and finally a murder conviction, former pathologist Jack Kevorkian was sentenced to 10 to 25 years in prison Tuesday and, smiling sadly, led in handcuffs from the courtroom. "You said you invited yourself here to make a final stand," Oakland County Circuit Judge Jessica Cooper said sternly before meting out the sentence prosecutors had sought. "You invited yourself to the wrong forum."
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Some major events in Dr. Jack Kevorkian's assisted suicide campaign: June 4, 1990: Janet Adkins, 54, of Portland, Ore., becomes the first person to use a suicide machine developed by Kevorkian. Murder charges are dropped when a judge rules Michigan has no law against assisted suicide. November 1991: Michigan suspends Kevorkian's medical license. May 2, 1994: Kevorkian acquitted of assisted suicide. March 8, 1996: Kevorkian acquitted of two assisted suicides.
NEWS
April 13, 1999 | From Reuters
Talk show host Jenny Jones testified Monday she did not try to embarrass Jonathan Schmitz, described by lawyers as so humiliated on her show about same-sex crushes that he killed his gay secret admirer. Jones, seen in nearly 4 million U.S. households daily, said in the $50-million wrongful death lawsuit against her producers that Schmitz showed no indication that he would later kill Scott Amedure.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Kevorkian, the eccentric former pathologist who for a decade defined and drove the national debate over assisted suicide, was convicted late Friday of second-degree murder in the death of a terminally ill man who had asked for his help. Separated from the courtroom gallery by a wall of 10 deputy sheriffs, the diminutive 70-year-old Kevorkian stood blank-faced, clasping his hands as the jury foreman declared him guilty of murdering Thomas Youk.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking rumpled and grandfatherly in his $3 gray thrift-store suit, Jack Kevorkian stood before a jury here Thursday and made what was perhaps the strongest defense argument of his murder trial. "Just look at me," he said, lifting his arms slightly. "Just look at me. Do you see a murderer?" Half an hour later, the panel left the courtroom to decide the fate of the retired pathologist in a murder trial that could prove the end of his decade-long crusade for physician-assisted suicide.
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