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Murders Rwanda

NEWS
May 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Rwandan minister, fired because he demanded punishment for rogue soldiers carrying out revenge attacks against suspects in his nation's 1994 genocide, was fatally shot, a family friend said. Seth Sendashonga, who survived a assassination attempt in February 1996, was killed in Nairobi, the Kenyan capital, along with his Rwandan driver, the friend said. Police refused to comment on the killings or whether any suspects were in custody.
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NEWS
February 3, 1997 | Associated Press
A gunman killed a Roman Catholic priest who was delivering communion to parishioners in a small settlement in northwestern Rwanda on Sunday, church officials said. The priest, who had worked in Rwanda for more than 35 years, was killed in Kampanga settlement and his body brought to the bishop's residence, said an official with the Roman Catholic diocese in Ruhengeri, who spoke on condition of anonymity. No Rwandan officials were available to comment, and details were sketchy.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | Associated Press
The Rwandan army and Hutu rebels have recently killed nearly 300 people in the northwestern corner of the country, a U.N. official said Friday. Many of the victims were unarmed civilians. The U.N. report, based on witness accounts, disputes government accounts that place the death toll lower. Ian Martin, head of the U.N. human rights team in the central African country, said the Tutsi-led army has killed more than 200 people in the Gisenyi area since June 24.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | From Associated Press
Machete-wielding Rwandan Hutu rebels attacked a resettlement camp in northwestern Rwanda, hacking to death at least 29 people and injuring scores of others, security officials said Friday. The attack occurred in Mutura, a border village 50 miles northwest of Kigali, Rwanda's capital, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Most of the victims were Tutsi civilians. The rebels had crossed over Thursday from Congo.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
European police arrested three men wanted by the United Nations for crimes against humanity during the 1994 Rwandan genocide, including the country's former finance minister and a priest. In Geneva, U.N. war crimes prosecutor Carla Del Ponte identified the men as Emmanuel Ndindabahizi, a former finance minister arrested in Belgium; Emmanuel Rukundo, a former army chaplain who was taken into custody in Geneva; and Simon Bikindi, a musician and founder of a radio station that incited the killings.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | From Reuters
A Rwandan militia leader pleaded guilty before a United Nations court Monday to charges of genocide and crimes against humanity for his role in the 1994 massacres of more than 800,000 people. He was formally convicted by the court's panel of three judges, who said the sentencing process will start Jan. 29.
NEWS
June 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A Belgian court today found two Rwandan nuns guilty of war crimes in the African nation's 1994 genocide in which more than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were slaughtered. The jury convicted the Roman Catholic nuns, Sisters Gertrude and Maria, of most of the counts of homicide against them. They were charged with helping Hutu extremists kill more than 5,000 people at their convent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2002 | Kenneth Reich, Times Staff Writer
Humanity is being challenged by private organizations such as Al Qaeda -- illegal combatants who would spread genocide throughout the world -- and aggressive countermeasures are necessary, the Bush administration's ambassador at large for war crimes issues told a Pepperdine University student convocation Wednesday.
OPINION
April 5, 2004 | David Scheffer, David Scheffer, U.S. ambassador at large for war crimes issues from 1997 to 2001, is a visiting professor at Georgetown University Law Center.
Ten years ago Tuesday, the Rwandan genocide -- the most concentrated slaughter of human beings in our generation -- began. During 100 days in 1994, an estimated 800,000 women, children and men, mostly ethnic Tutsis, were massacred. These murders were instigated by Rwandan government, military and media leaders and carried out by thousands of machete-wielding Hutus. Resurgent massacres plagued the countryside for years thereafter.
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