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Muscular Dystrophy

HEALTH
April 24, 2006 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
ANDREW KILBARGER was 4 years old when his preschool teacher realized something was terribly wrong. He didn't run or jump, and he couldn't pedal a bike. When his parents had him checked by his pediatrician, even the physician was stunned by the diagnosis: Andrew had Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a rare, inherited, degenerative muscle disorder that afflicts 30,000 in the U.S., almost exclusively boys.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good, the bad and the Uglys hit the road again Sunday for the nation's biggest motorcycling party--the Love Ride. More than 21,000 bikers, most of them astride powerful Harley-Davidsons and some from as far away as Canada, rumbled into Glendale early Sunday for the 11th annual Glendale-to-Castaic charity ride to benefit the Los Angeles chapter of the Muscular Dystrophy Assn.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | KATHRYN BOLD
A cuddly puppy, a wedding cake and $10,000 worth of cosmetic surgery were among the more unusual items on the auction block when the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. of Orange County held its inaugural gala to kick off the MDA's Labor Day weekend telethon. More than 250 guests turned up for the "Starry, Starry Night" dinner and auction Friday, which took place on the terrace of the Waterfront Hilton at Huntington Beach. The $75-per-person gala was expected to net about $25,000 for the MDA.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When the capped and gowned members of the Class of '92 gathered for graduation ceremonies on Wilson High School's athletic field last Friday night, nobody accepted a diploma with greater pride and gratitude than Ruben Cardiel. "I just kept thinking, 'I can do it, I can do it' . . . and I did," the young Highland Park man said of his determination to graduate from high school despite his debilitating, degenerative illness.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have developed a revolutionary way to treat genetic diseases that could greatly accelerate human gene therapy, which has been delayed for a decade by ethical considerations and technical problems. Special genetic material would simply be injected into muscle tissue every few days or weeks in much the same fashion that insulin is now injected daily to treat diabetes.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | HELEN O'NEILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is how Bill Rinaldi describes himself: a monster, a creature so different, so grotesque, that society feels threatened by his very existence. His huge head rolls back and his blue eyes twinkle. As usual, Rinaldi is exaggerating, pushing the limits of what people see when they first meet him, goading them into seeing something more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1993 | BERT ELJERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he turned 12, Neal Harvey started taking care of his father. He would wake up at 5, get his father out of bed, help him dress and then fix his breakfast. Neal, now 16, is still handling that daily routine. But that wasn't enough. The 6-foot-5 10th-grader at Los Alamitos High School wanted to do something more. So Neal nominated his father, Bernard Harvey, who suffers from muscular dystrophy and has been confined to a wheelchair since 1985, for one of the Muscular Dystrophy Assn.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
In the latest in a series of landmark studies involving muscular dystrophy, researchers reported last week they had identified a protein defect that apparently causes a less severe form of the crippling disorder. The findings reported in the New England Journal of Medicine will enable doctors to better diagnose various forms of the disease and should help in the search for treatments, experts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Jerry Lewis Labor Day Telethon raised $54.9 million for the Muscular Dystrophy Assn. and more than $1 million for victims of Hurricane Katrina. Lewis, 79, decided after seeing reports from the Gulf Coast to devote the two-day telethon both to children with muscular dystrophy and to Katrina victims. The telethon's total to fight muscular dystrophy was $4.5 million less than last year, but lower figures were expected due to the outpouring of donations for the hurricane victims.
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