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Museum Curators

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June 21, 1993
Name: Paul Apodaca Employer: Bowers Museum of Cultural Art Thumbs up: "We help people learn more about each other through the art they create and to gain a perspective on the history they live through. The artifacts and the people who made them become treasures and new-found family members." Thumbs down: "Schools, libraries, museums and zoos need protection from the fluctuations that occur in our society. These institutions are the keepers of our civilization.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When Native American activists from around the U.S. took over Alcatraz in 1969, George P. Horse Capture was a steel inspector for the state Department of Water Resources - a young man on his way to a solid career and ever further away from any sense of pride in his Montana reservation roots. "I was very happy climbing that white mountain of success," he once said. "But then I looked down over the top, and there was nothing there. " The solution was to switch mountains. Joining the protesters for short periods over their 19-month stay, Horse Capture went on to become a passionate advocate for Native American culture and a museum curator who helped give his people an unprecedented voice in how their heritage would be presented and their artifacts displayed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Two Southern California museums are represented in this year's awards for excellence in the categories of museum catalogues, articles and exhibitions from New York City's Assn. of Art Museum Curators. For exhibition catalogues, Elizabeth Armstrong took the top award for "Birth of the Cool: California Art, Design and Culture at Midcentury," for the Orange County Museum of Art's survey of the progressive cultural zeitgeist in Southern California that emerged after World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | By David Ng
This post has been corrected. The Assn. of Art Museum Curators handed out its annual awards this week, and among the honorees were Pacific Standard Time -- the recent survey of Southern California art organized by the Getty -- and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. PST received a first-place prize in the category of outstanding catalog based on an exhibition. The award was for the catalog " Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art 1945-1980 . " The first-place prize was shared by LACMA, for the exhibition catalog " Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore has opened an exhibit that trumpets its inclusion of forgeries to make a point: that forgeries now constitute as much as 60% of prints, paintings and artifacts bought and sold. The exhibit points out how difficult it is at first glance to determine the true from the false; on display are more than a dozen works purchased at high prices and believed to be original. "Caveat emptor. Let the buyer beware," said Gary Vikan, curator of the exhibit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
Is it possible to review an exhibition without ever having seen it? In the case of the San Diego Museum of Art's current show, "Reflections of Elegance: Cartier Jewels from the Lindemann Collection," the quality of the show itself is less at issue than the flawed direction it indicates in the museum's programming. This direction deserves comment, even if the show does not.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Holly Myers
Among the earliest work Walead Beshty produced after completing his MFA at Yale in 2002 was a series of photographs depicting his own body in various consumer settings -- shopping malls, department stores, supermarkets -- communing unceremoniously with the merchandise. He thrust his head into a miniature tent in the sporting goods aisle; pressed his torso into a wall of artificial flower leis; and draped himself limply across a frilly floral bedspread. Titled "The Phenomenology of Shopping," it was a peculiar and awfully funny body of work that seemed to point to a quirky, satirical sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2005 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
What happens when six artists get to rummage through a collection of 33 million objects with the understanding that they can mix and match their favorite findings to create new works? Left-brain logic goes out the window in favor of gut-instinct intuition that may or may not respect scholarly convention: A "cabinet of curiosities" is filled with fake Indian artifacts sculpted by a gifted con artist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Museum of Art named a new curator Thursday and announced the revamping of its permanent collection and the acquisition of major works believed to be valued in excess of $150,000. The new curator, Irene E. Hofmann, will join Deputy Director of Art and Chief Curator Elizabeth Armstrong and curator Sarah Vure on Oct. 1. Hofmann will be curator of contemporary art. "This is the largest curatorial team the museum has ever had," said OCMA board chairman emeritus Charles Martin.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Scott Schaefer, the County Museum of Art's curator of European paintings and sculpture for the past seven years, has resigned. Citing "differences" with administration over "what a museum is about" but declining to elaborate on them, Schaefer told The Times he will leave the museum at the end of the year. Museum Director Earl A. Powell also declined to comment on any philosophical differences that might have prompted Schaefer's departure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Mary Hunt Kahlenberg, an authority on antique and ethnographic textiles and a former curator and head of the Department of Costume and Textiles at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has died. She was 71. Kahlenberg, the longtime co-owner of Textile Arts Inc., an art gallery in Santa Fe, N.M., died of carcinoid cancer Thursday at her home in Santa Fe, said her husband, Rob Coffland. Over the last five decades, Kahlenberg traveled extensively around the world learning about and searching for textiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Collector Without Walls Norton Simon and His Hunt for the Best Sara Campbell Yale University Press: 496 pp., 2,250 illus., $65 Of all the eccentricities attributed to Norton Simon, his lack of interest in publishing scholarly books about his art collection is among the most baffling. Was Simon, one of the 20th century's premier collectors, spurning the academic establishment to which he didn't belong? Or just being himself, a brilliant contrarian and proud of it?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010
The new curators bring a rich mix of experience and aspirations to their jobs. Here's a sampling: FRANKLIN SIRMANS Department head and curator of contemporary art at LACMA A native of New York known as a critic and writer as well as curator of the national traveling exhibition "NeoHooDoo: Art for a Forgotten Faith," which grappled with ritualistic processes and spirituality in contemporary art, Sirmans came from the Menil collection...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Two look-alike oil paintings hang side by side in an alcove of the Fisher Museum at USC: one in an intricate gold frame, the other pinned to the wall like a memo. To the untrained eye both are the work of French painter Charles Émile Jacque, but USC senior Jayme Wilson points out a handful of flaws in the unframed painting. The lighting is off, details such as the animals and house are warped, and there are color variations. It turns out the pinned-up painting is a replica. The sociology and art history student had discovered that at least two museums claimed to own the same painting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Antonio Pineda, the internationally renowned Mexican modernist silversmith who was praised for his bold, striking jewelry designs and ingenious use of gemstones, has died. He was 90. Pineda died of kidney failure Monday at his ranch home in Taxco, Mexico, said his daughter Veronica Falzone. A Taxco native, Pineda was among the most prominent of the many silversmiths to emerge from the mountain mining town beginning in the 1930s. He was the subject of a 2008-09 exhibition at UCLA's Fowler Museum, “Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda,” which traced the evolution of his work through the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2009 | Janet Eastman
Sam Maloof, a designer and woodworker whose furniture was initially prized for its simplicity and practicality by Southern Californian homeowners in the 1950s and later valued for its beauty and timelessness by collectors, museum curators and U.S. presidents, has died. He was 93. Maloof died Thursday at his home in the Alta Loma section of Rancho Cucamonga, his longtime business manager Roz Bock confirmed. No further details were given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ned Johnson, a renowned ornithologist and curator of the UC Berkeley Museum of Invertebrate Biology, has died. He was 70. Johnson died June 11 at his home in the Northern California community of Orinda after a long battle with cancer, the university announced in a statement Wednesday. Over the years, Johnson collected more than 7,200 bird specimens, most of which are in the university's museum and available for study.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | Holly Myers
Among the earliest work Walead Beshty produced after completing his MFA at Yale in 2002 was a series of photographs depicting his own body in various consumer settings -- shopping malls, department stores, supermarkets -- communing unceremoniously with the merchandise. He thrust his head into a miniature tent in the sporting goods aisle; pressed his torso into a wall of artificial flower leis; and draped himself limply across a frilly floral bedspread. Titled "The Phenomenology of Shopping," it was a peculiar and awfully funny body of work that seemed to point to a quirky, satirical sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Two Southern California museums are represented in this year's awards for excellence in the categories of museum catalogues, articles and exhibitions from New York City's Assn. of Art Museum Curators. For exhibition catalogues, Elizabeth Armstrong took the top award for "Birth of the Cool: California Art, Design and Culture at Midcentury," for the Orange County Museum of Art's survey of the progressive cultural zeitgeist in Southern California that emerged after World War II.
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