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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1991
Mary Tyler Moore, Morley Safer and Walter Cronkite will participate in a tribute to CBS patriarch William S. Paley at a benefit tonight for the Museum of Television and Radio in New York. The museum--which Paley founded--is moving to expanded headquarters in Manhattan and will open there Sept. 12.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
After 31 years, the Museum of Television & Radio, which operates facilities in Beverly Hills and New York, said Tuesday that it was changing its name to the Paley Center for Media. The change is intended "to better reflect MTR's evolution to a center that convenes media leaders and enthusiasts for programs that explore and illuminate the immense and growing impact of all media on our lives, culture and society," the organization said in a news release. The new name also honors William S.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE
The Super Bowl attracts record television audiences each year, making it a showcase for advertising. The Museum of Television and Radio has selected 51 commercials from the last 13 Super Bowls for a film now airing at the Beverly Hills museum. Among the spots highlighted: * A small boy is sucked into a Pepsi bottle as his sister tattles, "Mom, he's done it again." The 1995 commercial ranks among the most popular Super Bowl spots ever.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | From City News Service
The Museum of Television & Radio's 24th annual William S. Paley Television Festival will begin March 1 with a panel on "American Idol" and conclude March 15 with a celebration of the 400 episodes of "The Simpsons." In between, there will be an evening with George Lucas (March 3) and sessions devoted to the first-season hits "Heroes" (March 10) and "Ugly Betty" (March 12). Tickets go on sale to museum members Feb. 1 and to the public on Feb. 9 at Ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | JANE HALL
Wielding more pairs of scissors than Edward Scissorhands, Time Warner Chairman Steve Ross, MCA President Sid Sheinberg, GTG Entertainment President Grant Tinker, Fox Inc. Chairman Barry Diller, Capital Cities/ABC Chairman Tom Murphy, actress Marlo Thomas and other members of the board of trustees cut the ribbon Thursday at the opening of the new Museum of Television and Radio here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996
Monday was opening day for the Museum of Television and Radio, a 23,000-square-foot archive in Beverly Hills that is an offshoot of the original museum in New York. Soon after the doors opened at noon at 465 N. Beverly Drive, a line of about 20 people formed outside. Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for senior citizens and students. The museum has 75,000 clips of TV and radio programs and advertising spots that the public can view or hear.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's strange enough making a phone call in order to watch a TV program, like Sting's pay-per-view concert. It's stranger still having to go to a museum to watch a TV program or hear a radio show that you really want to experience. But it's absolutely kooky having to leave the global heart of mass-media that Los Angeles has become and travel 3,000 miles in order to get to the museum. That is, until you get inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New York City-based Museum of Television and Radio announced plans Monday to open a sister museum in Beverly Hills in the fall of 1995 using digital recordings of its collection of more than 60,000 radio and TV programs. "I don't think there's ever been a museum in two locations with exactly the same collection," said Robert M. Batscha, president of the museum, established by CBS founder William S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a scene that called for Jack Ego, the unctuous radio talk-show host who called everyone, including his buddy "Al" Schweitzer, a "very close, very personal friend," and for Barbara Musk, the eager Hollywood starlet who was making "The Big Sky," the life story of God--whom Ego immediately claimed as a very close, very personal friend.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | Matea Gold
PBS President Pat Mitchell has been named to be the next president of the Museum of Television & Radio, a nonprofit organization based in New York and L.A. that preserves broadcast programs and facilitates seminars about the industry. Mitchell, who announced last year that she would be leaving her post at PBS this spring after six years there, said she wants to make the museum a leader in discussions about the technological changes transforming television and radio.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | Matea Gold
PBS President Pat Mitchell has been named to be the next president of the Museum of Television & Radio, a nonprofit organization based in New York and L.A. that preserves broadcast programs and facilitates seminars about the industry. Mitchell, who announced last year that she would be leaving her post at PBS this spring after six years there, said she wants to make the museum a leader in discussions about the technological changes transforming television and radio.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
John Cassavetes was a staple on live television in the 1950s, long before he became the director of such seminal film classics as "Shadows," "Faces" and "A Woman Under the Influence" and an award-winning movie star ("The Dirty Dozen," "Rosemary's Baby"). And even after the acclaim, he would continue to appear on the small screen well into the 1970s. But his influential films have long overshadowed his television work.
NEWS
July 1, 2004 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
Kids of all ages -- including inner children everywhere -- latch on to superheroes faster than a speeding bullet. No matter the decade, stories of caped crusaders, masked avengers and heroic do-gooders provide more than just popular diversion -- they can soothe the psyche. "These cultural icons are far more important than we think they are," explains Ellen Seiter, professor of critical studies at the USC School of Cinema-Television, who has extensively studied superheroes on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
A landmark television drama thought lost for 49 years and the only radio coverage known to exist of the 1935 trial of the man convicted of kidnapping and murdering Charles Lindbergh's baby son were both recently discovered and will be added to the collection of the Museum of Television & Radio, museum officials announced Tuesday. Both programs were found by the same enterprising documentarian, Joseph Consentino, during his research for a History Channel project.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2002 | Dana Calvo
With money and assistance from the country's largest Spanish-language television network, the Museum of Television & Radio will add a collection of Spanish-language radio and TV programs from this country, Spain and Latin America to its archives. Univision, which is providing the grant, reaches the overwhelming majority of Spanish-speaking viewers in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fledgling medium of television took a major leap on Christmas Eve 1951 when "Amahl and the Night Visitors" aired live on NBC. Not only was it the first opera commissioned exclusively for television, "Amahl" was also the first program presented under the "Hallmark Hall of Fame" banner. Gian Carlo Menotti wrote the one-act opera, which tells the story of a crippled shepherd boy and his long-suffering mother who are visited by the Three Kings on their way to Bethlehem to see the Christ child.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the dour, Bergmanesque period of "Interiors," before the dissonant notes of "September" and "Shadows and Fog" and "Alice"--before there were Mia and Soon-Yi and he became a kind of creepy curiosity, sitting courtside at New York Knicks games with his former lover's adopted daughter, Woody Allen was a stand-up comedian.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | From City News Service
The Museum of Television & Radio's 24th annual William S. Paley Television Festival will begin March 1 with a panel on "American Idol" and conclude March 15 with a celebration of the 400 episodes of "The Simpsons." In between, there will be an evening with George Lucas (March 3) and sessions devoted to the first-season hits "Heroes" (March 10) and "Ugly Betty" (March 12). Tickets go on sale to museum members Feb. 1 and to the public on Feb. 9 at Ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Museum of Television & Radio is ringing down the curtain on its annual William S. Paley Festival on Tuesday evening with a tribute to one of the visionaries of the golden age of television. Fred Coe was an innovative and insightful director and producer who was responsible for producing such acclaimed live TV dramas as Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty," "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin, J.P.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Batscha, president of the Museum of Television & Radio, still remembers the evening he hosted the panel featuring the cast of "The Tracey Ullman Show" during the annual William S. Paley Television Festival more than a decade ago. In Ullman's case, the British comic actress was still new to U.S. television and on the still young Fox network. It was a perfect fit for the yearly festival, which is designed as a celebration of television--but one that doesn't rely on ratings.
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