Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMushroom Cloud
IN THE NEWS

Mushroom Cloud

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Postal Service indicated Wednesday that it will bow to White House pressure and redesign a proposed "mushroom cloud" stamp that it had planned to issue next year to commemorate the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. In a statement issued late Wednesday, the service said it is "mindful of the sensitivities on this issue" and is "taking into consideration the views of the Department of State and the White House, as well as other groups and individuals."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 18, 2005 | PATT MORRISON
This is Hollywood, people, and in Hollywood we can't let even a game show -- far less a boffo cinematic moment in American politics -- pass by without a musical score: So. Should today's Senate confrontation be performed to the wet-your-pants suspenseful music from "Jaws"? The screeching violin terror from "Psycho"? The heart-cracking adagio lament from "Platoon"? Or the blackcomedic "Springtime for Hitler" from "The Producers"?
Advertisement
NEWS
December 5, 1985 | GEORGE STEIN and PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Two people were killed, three were missing and presumed dead and 45 were variously injured this morning when a chain of explosions from a gasoline-processing pump tore through an Atlantic Richfield refinery in Carson. The three-alarm blaze brought 23 fire companies, 2 hazardous materials teams and 3 paramedic helicopters to the scene, where witnesses said the series of blasts volleyed a fist of flame and a "mushroom cloud" of smoke as high as 500 feet into the air.
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Was that a mushroom cloud that the satellite saw hovering menacingly over North Korea or merely a patch of bad weather? Trying to end one of the more bizarre episodes in the standoff over North Korea's nuclear program, South Korea's deputy unification minister, Rhee Bong Jo, said Friday that "a closer inspection of the cloud suggests that it was a natural phenomenon." The cloud -- as well as an unexplained tremor measuring about magnitude 2.6 -- was detected Sept.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A Titan 34-D rocket, powerful enough to put a large truck into orbit, exploded seconds after lifting off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 10:45 a.m. today, sending a massive reddish cloud along the Central California coastline and rattling windows miles away. There were no reports of injuries, and an Air Force spokesperson said damage was confined to the launch complex itself on a bluff above the Pacific.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
Granados should count her blessings that her father was not on the Arizona or anywhere within reach of the Japanese forces during World War II. The ghastly legacy of Japanese tyranny in the 1940s is not as compact as a photograph of a mushroom cloud, but it exists, despite historical revisionism. I will never forget the Americans who died defending our country. Should the bomb have been used? The tough answer will always be yes, absolutely. Scott Holleran Glendale
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
The anti-nuclear group SANE criticized ABC today for refusing to air an anti-nuclear weapons ad during the "Amerika" series. David Cortright, executive director of SANE, said the group rejects ABC's "contention that 'Amerika' viewers must be shielded from a message about nuclear war." The 30-second ad shows a mushroom cloud and urges viewers to "say your peace." The "Amerika" series, beginning Sunday, present a fictional view of life in the United States after a Soviet takeover.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The commemorative program of anti-nuclear sentiment presented Monday at the Mark Taper Forum made me angry and unhappy. Can you imagine a more disturbing reaction to such a well-meaning event? The point was to underscore the obvious: That nuclear devastation is "pornographic." They didn't miss it. They subverted it. Unintentionally--which made it worse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999
It's 1955 and I am 9 years old, standing with my family on a solid wooden porch of the cabin my father built in Lucerne Valley, Calif. In the early morning hours of a hot summer we waited--with what seemed like front-row seats--for the moment when the entire eastern horizon would light up. First the sky turned from a glowing yellow to red, then gray. Puffy gray smoke formed a giant mushroom cloud. In a heartbeat the ground beneath us rumbled. It was the hydrogen bomb testing in Nevada.
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Was that a mushroom cloud that the satellite saw hovering menacingly over North Korea or merely a patch of bad weather? Trying to end one of the more bizarre episodes in the standoff over North Korea's nuclear program, South Korea's deputy unification minister, Rhee Bong Jo, said Friday that "a closer inspection of the cloud suggests that it was a natural phenomenon." The cloud -- as well as an unexplained tremor measuring about magnitude 2.6 -- was detected Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2002 | CHRIS KALTENBACH, BALTIMORE SUN
Baltimore gets nuked in "The Sum of All Fears." And people here seem to be taking it all in stride. "I haven't heard a whole lot on the street about it, to be honest," says Mayor Martin O'Malley, who attended a special screening of the film. "It's certainly riveting to see your skyline with a mushroom cloud rolling over it. But then, Hollywood has been sending tidal waves over New York for years."
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
As Nevada officials fight against hosting the nation's nuclear repository, the state is offering license plates bearing the image of a nuclear blast. The fund-raising license plate designed to honor Nevada's atomic past has bombed with some as ill-timed and inappropriate. Others don't have a problem with the idea of cars with optional mushroom cloud license plates sharing roads with tractor-trailers hauling radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | MARY MELTON
THE PREPPING HANDBOOK * The Democratic National Convention handed out hospitality kits to each of the 4,506 delegates, filled with California-grown raisins, oranges, tuna, olives, dates and wine, and a jar of "dietetic" fruit labeled, "Welcome Delegates -- Gov. 'Pat' Brown." * To accommodate feeding as many as 16,000 daily attendees, the Sports Arena installed "new radar ranges that can cook beef, bake potatoes and vegetables in a minute and 10 seconds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999
It's 1955 and I am 9 years old, standing with my family on a solid wooden porch of the cabin my father built in Lucerne Valley, Calif. In the early morning hours of a hot summer we waited--with what seemed like front-row seats--for the moment when the entire eastern horizon would light up. First the sky turned from a glowing yellow to red, then gray. Puffy gray smoke formed a giant mushroom cloud. In a heartbeat the ground beneath us rumbled. It was the hydrogen bomb testing in Nevada.
BOOKS
August 9, 1998 | TOM ENGELHARDT, Tom Engelhardt is the author of "The End of Victory Culture" (University of Massachusetts Press) and co-editor of "History Wars: The Enola Gay and Other Battles for the American Past" (Metropolitan Books)
Aficionados might reasonably differ over which were the vintage years for atomic films. As "Celluloid Mushroom Clouds" shows, the years from 1953 to 1955, a cusp moment in the on-screen development of nuclearized America, should be near the top of anyone's list.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO
A few nuclear bombs can really ruin your day, or so that 1970s-era line used to go.Let's hope no one worried for even a minute last week that India's sudden appetite for destruction might have a dampening effect on U.S. financial markets. U.S. Treasury bond yields just gyrated in their usual (of late) thin-as-a-toothpick range, and the Dow Jones industrial average went on to a new high by Wednesday, though it gave some modest ground by Friday.
NEWS
November 6, 1986 | JOYCE A. VENEZIA, Associated Press
Twelve-year-old Emma Weiskopf and her friends want to collect the names of children who are opposed to war, even if it means that some classmates will mock their attempts. "It's kind of embarrassing because the kids in middle school think we're geeks," Emma said. "They're into music and makeup, and they think war is not going to happen. That's stupid." Last year, Emma and a circle of friends started a group called Children Against War.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2002 | CHRIS KALTENBACH, BALTIMORE SUN
Baltimore gets nuked in "The Sum of All Fears." And people here seem to be taking it all in stride. "I haven't heard a whole lot on the street about it, to be honest," says Mayor Martin O'Malley, who attended a special screening of the film. "It's certainly riveting to see your skyline with a mushroom cloud rolling over it. But then, Hollywood has been sending tidal waves over New York for years."
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
Granados should count her blessings that her father was not on the Arizona or anywhere within reach of the Japanese forces during World War II. The ghastly legacy of Japanese tyranny in the 1940s is not as compact as a photograph of a mushroom cloud, but it exists, despite historical revisionism. I will never forget the Americans who died defending our country. Should the bomb have been used? The tough answer will always be yes, absolutely. Scott Holleran Glendale
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | MARY ANN HOGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's time again for the ultimate test of what's in and what's out. Early next month, behind closed doors, the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee will meet here to discuss who and what should appear on that singular place of national honor--a U.S. postage stamp. The issues are sticky. What about popular but tainted? Think Elvis stamp, with its $36 million in revenue last year--although other drug-using singers (Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin) were rejected. What about historic but tainted?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|