Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMusic
IN THE NEWS

Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Kari Howard
One of the qualities I value most in the writers of the Great Reads are their powers of observation. I'm a big believer in showing, not telling -- in giving those little scenes and details that make readers connect to people whose lives might seem impossibly remote from theirs. The writer of Friday's powerful Great Read, Raja Abdulrahim, is particularly gifted: She finds those moments when she's directly in the line of fire in Syria. In Friday's story, Raja, who has made her way into rebel-held territory many times during the three-year conflict, wrote from Aleppo, where life alternates between terror and a grotesque version of normalcy.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Elvis Costello and Elton John are joining forces for a talk-and-tunes series to air on Sundance Channel. "Spectacle: Elvis Costello With . . ." will be a 13-week series on which Costello plays host to artists and other personalities for an hour of discussion and performance. "This is a wonderful opportunity to talk in complete thoughts about music, movies, art or even vaudeville, then frame it with unique and illustrative performances," Costello said in a statement. John, who also will appear, will be an executive producer of the series, which is scheduled to premiere in December.
HEALTH
April 12, 2014 | Vincent Boucher
Not long ago, I read an article about how some men stay in shape, and one guy said his tactic was to hit the gym any time he could and take whatever class was on tap. That speaks to the appeal of classes -- a defined start and end time with a leader to put you through your paces, no aimless wandering around the gym waiting for equipment, plus the camaraderie of exercising with a group. And going to class regularly can be important. Besides the obvious physical benefits, studies such as one recently published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology suggest that inactivity affects the structure and function of the brain and contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Everyone has had the experience of disagreeing with a critic, but do critics ever second-guess themselves? We asked Calendar's critics whether there are any reviews they regret. One in a series of occasional articles. -- Since 1976, I have enjoyed the music of Philip Glass. Before then, I did not. "Einstein on the Beach" changed everything. Experiencing the five-hour opera with its repetitious score performed without a break, no real text and a staging by Robert Wilson full of unforgettable images may not have been the full-blown religious conversion for me that it had been to some.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jermaine Jackson says he took a biting musical swipe at his superstar sibling, Michael, because his younger brother had frozen him out of his life. In an interview, Jermaine explained that the cantankerous lyrics to his song "Word to the Badd!!," which criticize Michael for allegedly changing his skin color and obtaining plastic surgery, were written in retaliation for eight months of unreturned phone calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country's rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn't allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela's jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela's messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
Pop & Jazz Previews by August Brown (A.B.) and Todd Martens (T.M). Music Go Music "Expressions," the debut album from Music Go Music, had little pre-release hype -- it was issued with only a vague news release with clearly made-up aliases (TORG, Gala Bell). In reality, the band is fronted by Meredith and David Metcalf from prog-ish outfit Bodies of Water, and their debut is a hook-filled blast through pop's past. Or to be more specific, the '70s, as Music Go Music's songs are packed with spooky synths, brash guitars and colossal, ABBA-inspired choruses.
NEWS
January 9, 2011 | By Eryn Brown
You know that feeling you get when you listen to a favorite part of a favorite song?  Some scientists have a refreshingly unscientific word for it: They call it the "chills. " In the lab they can measure the chills, which correspond with a specific pattern of brain arousal and often are accompanied by increases in heart and breathing rates and other physical responses.   Now neurologists report that this human response to music -- which has existed for thousands of years, across cultures around the world -- involves dopamine, the same chemical in the brain that is associated with the intense pleasure people get from more tangible rewards such as food or addictive drugs.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Ogilvie
Onstage at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, an older couple assumes a ballroom dance position. A tango begins, and the man, wearing a porkpie hat and suit, leads. The woman, wearing a floral dress, follows gracefully. Judging by the ease and fluidity of their movements, one would never know that Nancy Dufault, 72, has Parkinson's disease. When she is dancing, moving in time with her husband, Bob, she experiences a brief respite from symptoms. "She asked me to write a tango," says Mike Garson, a classically trained pianist who played with David Bowie for nearly 40 years.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Gregory Kelly is a small-scale historian who is out to memorialize big-time Southern California landmarks, one by one. There's the miniature Watts Towers, an elaborate depiction of Newport Beach's Balboa Pavilion and a proportionally correct model of Silver Lake's Music Box Steps - all tucked in Kelly's crowded Tustin hobby shop. Not bad for a man who had never even built a plastic model airplane before deciding at age 20 to open his own shop in a building owned by his father.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes
The push to bring a major music festival to downtown Los Angeles - one with rapper Jay Z expected to play a creative role - has set off a tussle between two L.A. politicians. Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar contends he was left out of discussions, spearheaded by Mayor Eric Garcetti in recent weeks, over bringing the two-day Budweiser Made in America music festival to Grand Park and the nearby steps of City Hall. Huizar, who represents most of downtown, called for the city to withhold approval of any permits for the Labor Day weekend event until the details are properly vetted.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Finding healing in music,” Column, March 22 Music as a tool to help children cope with feelings of grief and pain has been shown to be an effective intervention; in fact, even lighthearted group drumming sessions can be of positive benefit. Incorporating sensory integrative activities, such as music, help break down barriers posed by the feelings of fear, frustration, desperation and helplessness that children face when dealing with the loss of a loved one. I underscore Arvis Jones' music therapy methodology as part of a psychosocial grief management recovery process for traumatized children.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Rocki is a music streaming device that lets users listen to music from their smartphones on their big speakers without having to put their phone down. The gadget works by hooking up directly to users' speakers through an auxiliary or RCA cable. Users then connect the device to the same Wi-Fi network as their smartphone so that they can send music over the network and onto the Rocki . The Rocki is a tiny little gadget that fits in the palm of the hand. It comes in seven skin colors: orange, purple, pink, red, yellow, black and green.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By James C. Taylor
NEW YORK - Pianist Evgeny Kissin speaks many languages, but to audiences around the world he is best known - and in some circles, revered - for his ability to articulate, with precision, the greatest scores of the classical piano repertoire. Talking with the Russian-born artist on New York's Upper West Side a few days before a sold-out solo recital at Carnegie Hall (the program of Scriabin and Schubert will repeat at Disney Hall on Monday), it becomes immediately clear that Kissin's mind is hard-wired for accuracy.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic
This is Beverly Hills?, I wondered, oh so many years ago when a friend took me to lunch in a sweet little house with a fireplace on South Beverly Drive. Chez Mimi later moved to Santa Monica, and Urth Caffé now dispenses soy lattes and iced green tea from that rose-covered cottage. Back then (and now), South Beverly Drive didn't seem fancy at all, more like a small-town Main Street where you'd find shops selling nightgowns and one-piece swimming suits, baseball cards and birthday gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2009 | Steve Appleford
Hope Sandoval prefers the darkness. It's how she feels comfortable onstage, with the lights down low, freeing the singer from the distraction of all those strangers watching from the audience. "I just hide and sing," she explains. Sometimes, she hides a little too well. After a September performance in San Francisco, four fans demanded a refund because they couldn't see her, as if unconvinced that Sandoval had been there at all. "It's so ridiculous," she says, more puzzled than annoyed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
How do you help little children, too young to know what death really means, cope with the feelings of grief and pain that the loss of a loved one brings? If you're music therapist Arvis Jones, you let them bang on a drum, do the hokey-pokey or join a choir and sing. Jones is part of a growing professional field that taps the restorative power of music to help traumatized children heal. For 20 years, she's been going to crime scenes, hospitals, funerals and schools, reaching out to grieving families with a bin of unorthodox tools - keyboards, claves, jingle sticks, tambourines, djembe and tubano drums.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|