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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Elvis Costello and Elton John are joining forces for a talk-and-tunes series to air on Sundance Channel. "Spectacle: Elvis Costello With . . ." will be a 13-week series on which Costello plays host to artists and other personalities for an hour of discussion and performance. "This is a wonderful opportunity to talk in complete thoughts about music, movies, art or even vaudeville, then frame it with unique and illustrative performances," Costello said in a statement. John, who also will appear, will be an executive producer of the series, which is scheduled to premiere in December.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | Times staff and wire service reports
Michael Heisley Billionaire businessman moved NBA's Grizzlies from Vancouver to Memphis Michael Heisley, 77, a billionaire businessman who moved the NBA's Grizzlies from Vancouver to Memphis and made an unsuccessful bid to buy the Dodgers in 2012, died Saturday, the Grizzlies said. Heisley, who sold his basketball team before the start of the 2012-13 season, suffered a stroke last year. Co-founder of The Heico Companies, Heisley was a computer salesman who parlayed investments in underperforming businesses into a corporation with interests in food production, heavy equipment, pre-engineered metal buildings and other industries.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
There are frequent fliers, and then there are people like Steven Rothstein and Jacques Vroom. Both men bought tickets that gave them unlimited first-class travel for life on American Airlines. It was almost like owning a fleet of private jets. Passes in hand, Rothstein and Vroom flew for business. They flew for pleasure. They flew just because they liked being on planes. They bypassed long lines, booked backup itineraries in case the weather turned, and never worried about cancellation fees.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Simon Mundy
  The plot of the South Korean television series "My Love From the Star" is farfetched, dealing with an alien who falls in love with a pop star. But the drama dominated a morning of debate for a Chinese Communist Party committee last month when delegates lamented the inability of homegrown offerings to match the show's runaway success in China. "The Korean drama craze … is resulting in a lack of confidence in our own culture," warned Xu Qinsong, a party official from Guangdong.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jermaine Jackson says he took a biting musical swipe at his superstar sibling, Michael, because his younger brother had frozen him out of his life. In an interview, Jermaine explained that the cantankerous lyrics to his song "Word to the Badd!!," which criticize Michael for allegedly changing his skin color and obtaining plastic surgery, were written in retaliation for eight months of unreturned phone calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country's rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn't allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela's jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela's messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
Pop & Jazz Previews by August Brown (A.B.) and Todd Martens (T.M). Music Go Music "Expressions," the debut album from Music Go Music, had little pre-release hype -- it was issued with only a vague news release with clearly made-up aliases (TORG, Gala Bell). In reality, the band is fronted by Meredith and David Metcalf from prog-ish outfit Bodies of Water, and their debut is a hook-filled blast through pop's past. Or to be more specific, the '70s, as Music Go Music's songs are packed with spooky synths, brash guitars and colossal, ABBA-inspired choruses.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Since the beginning of time, or at least until Sony rolled out the Walkman, listening to music has been a stationary experience -- you went to the source of the sound, whether it was a bunch of tribesmen beating their drums or the stereo system in the living room. But the Walkman and then Apple's iPod dramatically changed the way we listen to music. And now music apps are transforming the experience even more by turning smartphones into portable jukeboxes and radios. Because there are so many music listening apps coming out these days it's hard to keep track of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
In 1978 on a 1,600-acre farm in rural Washington, Don Emerson Sr., one of a long line of builders, loggers and sawmill workers whose livelihood was earned in the timber surrounding them, noticed that two of his teenage sons, Joe and Donnie, had taken a liking to music. He'd see them doing their chores while listening to radio from Spokane 70 miles to the southeast and encouraged them as they began writing and playing their own music. They even went into a studio to make a record but were disappointed with the experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011
Ojai Music Festival When: Thursday through Sunday, full schedule at http://www.ojaifestival.org Where: Libbey Bowl, Ojai Tickets: $15 to $110
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Kari Howard
Ever since I started working with Raja Abdulrahim on her Syria stories two years ago, I've listened to Radiohead while editing them. It didn't start out as a running soundtrack to a writer and the conflict she still covers, but Radiohead's music has that combination of sorrow and alienation and dread and vulnerability that runs through the Syria conflict. I remember choosing “Talk Show Host” for the first story. (Warning: There's a bit of Anglo-Saxon language.) Its line about “I'll be waiting with a gun and a pack of sandwiches” seemed to echo the story's juxtaposition of violence and everyday life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival may have wrapped up last week, but still unfurling in Coachella's Pueblo Viejo District is an ambitious project that has brought together about a dozen muralists and international contemporary artists. "Coachella Walls," which has no formal connection to the Goldenvoice-produced festival, is billed as an "arts-driven community revitalization project. " Its organizers are Coachella-based Date Farmers Art Studios, a.k.a., the artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez, who grew up in the area and now show their work at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
Keira Knightley is used to early wake-up calls. The actress has a penchant for period films, and it takes a while to get tied into a corset. But on the set of the modern-day romance "Begin Again," the British star's call time was decidedly later than on "Anna Karenina" or "Pride & Prejudice. " "I'm so used to sitting in a chair for two hours getting my hair and makeup done," she said recently via telephone from the U.K., "but this time I turned up half an hour before I needed to start shooting and chucked my hair in a ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
The scene in the early hours of Stagecoach 2014 invites a philosophical inquiry of Socratic dimension: Which came first: the deluge of country songs about girls in Daisy Dukes, or the deluge of girls in said Daisy Dukes? Perhaps that historic first song, whichever tune it was that warrants blame for the outpouring of one-dimensional celebrations of imagined rural life that barely run skin deep, was inspired by some real-world situation. Even so, the subsequent assembly line response from the Nashville songwriting community no doubt has fueled the sea of cutoff jeans that constituted part of the official uniform of at least half the country music audience today in Indio.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Depending on your knowledge of the material and expectations going in, the touring version of "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess," which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, might be either an ingenious, audience-friendly re-creation or a bastardization of this classic American show. Both perspectives can reside within the same spectator, as they do within me, one alternately gaining the upper hand over the other. Undeniable, however, is the majesty of the score, which begins after the Overture with "Summertime" and keeps soaring with "My Man's Gone Now," "Bess, You Is My Woman Now" and "I Loves You, Porgy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By John Horn
SYDNEY, Australia - The video playing on the television inside Baz Luhrmann's bedroom was supposed to be much steamier. But where there should have been desirous bumping and prurient grinding, the couples were remarkably chaste, as if they had been ordered to abstain from all manner of randy moves. "Look at this," the filmmaker behind "Moulin Rouge!" and "The Great Gatsby" said from the foot of his bed. "You couldn't get any more sexless. " Working inside the creative compound he calls Iona in Sydney's arty Darlinghurst neighborhood, Luhrmann was sitting with a reporter, reviewing news clips from 1980s Australian ballroom dancing competitions, whose judges favored technique over passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
MUSIC Jacaranda, the Westside music series that presents obscure and experimental classical music, will stage a concert featuring the work of composers Leon Kirchner, Richard Rodney Bennett, Christopher Rouse and William Schuman. First Presbyterian Church, 1220 2nd St., Santa Monica. 8 p.m. Sat., 6 p.m. Sun. $20 to $40. (213) 483-0216, http://www.jacarandamusic.org
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Documentary short "Music by Prudence" Roger Ross Williams and Elinor Burkett In a category some might be surprised to still see on the broadcast in a year of 10 best picture nominees, the Oscar for documentary short subject went to "Music by Prudence," made by Roger Ross Williams and Elinor Burkett, the story of a band of disabled musicians in Zimbabwe. Williams made it to the stage first and had begun speaking when Burkett stepped to the microphone and excitedly began to talk over Williams, saying, "In a world in which most of us are told, and tell ourselves, that we can't, we honor the band behind this film who teaches us that we're wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Michael Nesmith's name is far more often associated with the Monkees than the birth of Southern California country rock. Yet the former rock sitcom star played a key part in a 1960s scene when long hair and cowboy boots all a sudden made sense together. Nesmith blended rock and country music alongside artists such as Linda Ronstadt and Gram Parsons. Much of it happened at the Troubadour, where the hybrid sound was taking shape. "Linda would come play, the Dillards, [Roger] McGuinn would come play, [David]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Elizabeth Hand
"People are trapped in history and history is trapped in them," wrote James Baldwin in "Notes of a Native Son. " Much of novelist Emma Donoghue's literary career has involved the liberation of historical figures, often women, from the constraints of the recorded past to the relative freedom of fiction, as in her novels "Slammerkin," "The Sealed Letter" and "Life Mask," all set in the 18th or 19th century. Her most recent work, the multiple-award-winning international bestseller "Room," took a more contemporary approach, loosely inspired by the experiences of women recently held captive by abusive men. In her new novel, "Frog Music," Donoghue returns to the more distant past to take on an unsolved San Francisco murder: that of young Jenny Bonnet, shot by an unknown killer lurking outside her railway hotel room.
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