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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1998
We could not agree more with your Nov. 10 editorial "Keep Music in Mind." The American Assn. of University Women, Orange Branch, has for the past 22 years supported music education in Orange, Tustin and Santa Ana public schools by providing musical instruments at nominal rental cost to children who would otherwise be unable to participate in school music programs. The need is great, as are the rewards for providing an opportunity for eager young students. The decline in California school-based music and band programs has been a source of concern.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's multifaceted TchaikovskyFest has thus far weathered political incident. That is to say, nothing happened Friday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall to land performances of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto and Second Symphony on the front page or in the international spotlight. The concert, performed by the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela (sharing the festival with the L.A. Phil) and conducted by Gustavo Dudamel, did draw an assembly of demonstrators in front of Disney.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Rabbit helps sell children on classical music in "Disney's Young People's Guide to Music: The Greatest Band in the Land" on the Disney cable channel at 7:30 tonight. It's the first of two specials aimed at music appreciation. The second, "A Tune for Toon," will air in the spring. The sprightly half-hour has a simple formula: On stage is the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, a slew of instruments and personable young conductor Rachel Worby of the Wheeling West Virginia Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By David Ng
Gustavo Dudamel has found himself in the midst of a political debate in his native Venezuela over a recent concert he conducted that was attended by the country's controversial leader, President Nicolas Maduro. The Times' World Now blog reported Friday that Dudamel led a performance of the Youth Orchestra of Lara in the city of Maracay on Wednesday. Maduro, who was in the audience, is facing a national crisis following eruptions of violence in a number of cities, leaving three dead and many more injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Music teachers Diane Simons and Jane Hardester have seen a generation of children who don't know how to sing. They don't even know songs like "Hot Cross Buns." And the veteran musicians are concerned that this is just the beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
The plight of music in the schools is not unlike the old saw about the weather--everyone talks about it, but no one does anything about it. Last January, however, a group of educators, parents and members of the local music community organized to lobby the San Diego Unified School District to increase its support of music education within the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1999 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't even know the alphabet yet. Their fingers are too small to play more than three notes consecutively, and six or seven years will pass before their feet can touch the piano pedals. But the 2- and 3-year-olds taking piano lessons at Patrick Music School in Fullerton are not working on technique.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Opera Pacific, the county's only professional opera company, shut down its education department in budget cutbacks two years ago, Ann Noriel and Steve Parkin lost their jobs. But they knew what to do to make sure kids still got to experience opera. They formed their own troupe, Southland Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Nearly 6,000 members of the Music Educators National Conference have convened at the Anaheim Convention Center this week to discuss issues ranging from the effects of computer technology to state certification of teachers.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | KATHRYN BOLD
The Event: Big Toys for Big Boys, a benefit for the Pacific Symphony Orchestra League, featured exotic cars, martinis and swing. The event, which included a buffet dinner and auction, took place Sunday at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin. A guy thing: About 250 guests--nearly half of them men--roamed around the museum admiring ultra-rare Ferraris, Mustangs and race cars from the Marconi collection. Some sipped martinis and danced to Doc Anello and the Swing Machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Donald J. Para, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Cal State Long Beach, was appointed Thursday as interim president while the college searches for a successor to the departing F. King Alexander. During 26 years at the Long Beach campus, Para has served in several positions including dean of the College of Arts. Para also previously served as chair of the department of music at Cal State Los Angeles. He earned a bachelor's degree in music education and master's in music composition at Western Michigan University and a doctorate in music composition from Michigan State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
LONDON - Downing a lunch of fish and chips just before going onstage Friday at the Barbican Centre here, 10 upbeat teenagers from Los Angeles acted, like teens everywhere, as if they were casually taking it all in. They weren't. For most of these high-schoolers, this was their first trip away from home, and it didn't take long for them to admit that everything, from flying in an airplane to witnessing a snowstorm just after they landed last Wednesday, was a gleeful new experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013
Princess Leia is onboard Carrie Fisher has said "yes," she will reprise her role as Princess Leia in "Episode VII" of the "Star Wars" franchise. Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford may be close behind. George Lucas says that three stars of the first trio of "Star Wars" films were in "final negotiations" months ago to appear in the film that Disney is preparing. They'd "already signed," he told Bloomberg in an article published Thursday, or were "pretty much in final stages" of negotiations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By David Ng
Gustavo Dudamel will fly to Caracas, Venezuela for the funeral Friday  of President Hugo Chavez, and the L.A. Philharmonic music director might lead a concert tied to the Chavez events. The Venezuelan-born conductor is expected to head to Caracas directly after the Thursday evening performance of  "The Gospel According to the Other Mary" at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Grant Gershon, the artistic director of the L.A. Master Chorale, will conduct the Friday evening performance of the piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
Staples Center is bustling with activity ahead of Sunday's Grammy Awards. Red carpets are being rolled out, producers are going over the run of the show, and chart-topping artists are polishing their performances. Just two miles away, in USC's Grand Ballroom, another type of Grammy-related rehearsal is taking place. The music director for Latin superstar Juanes stands in the middle of a seven-piece band giving its members pointers on how to play "Me Enamora. " However, the musicians intently running through the track aren't employed by the Grammy-winning singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By David Ng
Gustavo Dudamel, 31, seems practically middle-aged compared to Jose Angel Salazar, a 14-year-old El Sistema student who has gained attention recently for his talent as a conductor. Salazar is the subject of a recent profile by Reuters that recounts his training in El Sistema,Venezuela's state-funded program that provides free music education to disadvantaged youth. The report states that Salazar is the youngest conductor in the country.  Dudamel, who was also trained in El Sistema and is the music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was in his early 20s when he started attracting international attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Musically, Venezuela is like no other place on Earth. Along with baseball and beauty pageants, classical music is one of the country's greatest passions. In the capital, Caracas, superstar Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel is mobbed wherever he goes. Classical music teeny-boppers run up to him for autographs when he walks off the podium at concerts. The state-run music education program, which is known as El Sistema and from which Dudamel emerged, is the most extensive, admired and increasingly imitated in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's appropriate that when Tricia Tunstall first entered the world of Gustavo Dudamel, her guide was the daughter of the musician Dudamel regards as one of his spiritual mentors: Leonard Bernstein. In winter 2008, Jamie Bernstein, a writer and broadcaster, went to hear Dudamel conduct the Israel Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall in a program that included her father's Concerto for Orchestra ("Jubilee Games"). She brought along her friend Tunstall, a New York musician, music educator and author of the just published book "Changing Lives: Gustavo Dudamel, El Sistema, and the Transformative Power of Music.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
This post has been updated. What better way to usher in summer than by celebrating legends outdoors with a loaded picnic basket, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and a night sky streaked with pastel fireworks as though Monet had been dispatched by God to spruce up the heavens? Reba McEntire, the queen of country, and Chaka Khan, the queen of funk - two singers whose genre-crossing talents have impressed connoisseurs from across the musical spectrum - were inducted into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - When Gavin Martin and his family moved here from southern India in the early '70s, the country's capital city offered the gifted young pianist exactly one option for continuing his music education: the Delhi School of Music. It was the only place in town - perhaps in the whole of northern India - that taught Western classical music with any degree of competence. Even so, life wasn't easy for the serious student born in a country where the sitar is king. "Growing up in India playing the piano was kind of like [being]
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