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October 9, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
In a steely and stressful time, geopolitically speaking, it is curiously refreshing to step aside for an evening or several, and contemplate the course of musical beauty from the 14th Century forward. Composer Leonard Rosenman's cathedral-ceilinged living room has a grand piano flanked by a pair of hi-fi speakers capable of raising the dead. There is on one side of the room an open stairway and an open mezzanine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Without as much as a hint, Beyonce stealthily released her new album. As the West Coast was tucking into bed Thursday night, the singer rolled out one of the best-kept secrets in recent music history: The album she had spent the last year teasing was now available for purchase on iTunes. The self-titled set comes as a “visual album” featuring 14 new tracks and 17 music videos. It's currently available as an iTunes exclusive. Manufacturing of physical albums begins Thursday and a double disc CD/DVD will be available before the holidays, according to her label.  PHOTOS: Beyonce's Mrs. Carter tour Working with Jay Z, Timbaland, Justin Timberlake, Pharrell Williams, Drake, the Dream, Sia, Ryan Tedder, Miguel, Frank Ocean and Hit Boy, the singer churned out her most ambitious project to date, without ever actually saying she was putting out an album any time soon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Deep within the high-security Iron Mountain storage facility in Hollywood, where nearly every doorway except for the restroom is protected by a security-card swipe lock, sits the Grammy Museum's permanent collection of pop music artifacts, recordings and memorabilia. Hundreds of 10-inch 78 rpm discs - some from Thomas Edison's record label - reside in archival boxes on 20-foot-long metal shelves, near antique radios and phonograph players, musical instruments, posters and some celebrity fashion items stored out of sight in sturdy garment bags.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
MTV, VH1 and CMT are looking to celebrate America's independence the old-fashioned way. Not with burgers and hot dogs and fireworks, but by playing music videos on their channels in what they're calling "Music Independence Day. " The plan is that all three networks will play music videos on July 4th from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. EDT/PDT. What makes this plan even more intriguing is that they're branching out from just the standard Top 20 playlists or classic hits. While there will be big names and classic moments from music history spotlighted, they're also looking to play music from new and emerging artists, culled from music submitted to the music networks' new online music discovery site called the Artists' Platform.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1995 | DAN MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Graphix Zone Inc., the multimedia company best known for its interactive disc featuring singer Bob Dylan, said Wednesday that it has signed a deal with legendary jazz pianist and composer Herbie Hancock to produce a three-part CD-ROM series on the history of jazz. The four-time Grammy award winner has already been assigned an office at the Irvine company's headquarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
A new line of Jazz 101 recordings -- "Jazz Legends" -- has arrived and it's as valuable as the series created for Ken Burns' "Jazz" documentary for PBS. This one's from a far less publicized source: Portland, Ore., distributor Allegro. All the recordings are from the first half of the 20th century, and all are the original versions. Selected and annotated by writer Scott Yanow, they are being released in groups of four. The first dozen are in stores now and more are coming later this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
From a 1927 Broadway musical comedy to a 2008 basketball game in Anaheim is a big journey for a song to make. But that's exactly the trip that one of UCLA's fight songs will be completing tonight, thanks to its creators -- the incomparable Gershwin brothers. As the Gershwins might say, 's wonderful. UCLA's Varsity Band is expected to play "Strike Up the Band for UCLA" at Anaheim's Honda Center as the men's basketball team plays in the first round of the NCAA's March Madness tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Without as much as a hint, Beyonce stealthily released her new album. As the West Coast was tucking into bed Thursday night, the singer rolled out one of the best-kept secrets in recent music history: The album she had spent the last year teasing was now available for purchase on iTunes. The self-titled set comes as a “visual album” featuring 14 new tracks and 17 music videos. It's currently available as an iTunes exclusive. Manufacturing of physical albums begins Thursday and a double disc CD/DVD will be available before the holidays, according to her label.  PHOTOS: Beyonce's Mrs. Carter tour Working with Jay Z, Timbaland, Justin Timberlake, Pharrell Williams, Drake, the Dream, Sia, Ryan Tedder, Miguel, Frank Ocean and Hit Boy, the singer churned out her most ambitious project to date, without ever actually saying she was putting out an album any time soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected, please see below for details. In March, the Sunset Strip music venue the Key Club announced that it was closing for good. Few local music fans were especially surprised. The venue had operated in various guises since the '60s - first as Gazzarri's, where it hosted such rock 'n' roll royalty as the Doors, Guns N' Roses and Van Halen - and as the Key Club since 1998. It closed briefly in 2009, but 2013 was to be the final curtain for the club's monthly slate of heavy metal, hip-hop and stuffed local bills where bands sometimes had to prepay for blocks of tickets.
NEWS
June 12, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Iowa music history professor has found portions of two little-known Viennese operas he says were written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the New York Times reported. The discovery was made by David J. Buch, a professor of music history at the University of Northern Iowa last year in the archives of the City and University Library in Hamburg, Germany. Mozart's compositions are included in "The Philosopher's Stone" and "The Beneficent Dervish."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected, please see below for details. In March, the Sunset Strip music venue the Key Club announced that it was closing for good. Few local music fans were especially surprised. The venue had operated in various guises since the '60s - first as Gazzarri's, where it hosted such rock 'n' roll royalty as the Doors, Guns N' Roses and Van Halen - and as the Key Club since 1998. It closed briefly in 2009, but 2013 was to be the final curtain for the club's monthly slate of heavy metal, hip-hop and stuffed local bills where bands sometimes had to prepay for blocks of tickets.
SPORTS
May 2, 2013 | By David Wharton
The death of Chris Kelly, half of the 1990s kid rap duo Kris Kross, recalls a time when the group's biggest hit, "Jump," was a staple in sports arenas around the country. The 34-year-old Kelly died at an Atlanta hospital on Wednesday of an apparent drug overdose, authorities said. "Jump" was he and partner Chris Smith's biggest hit, released in the early 1990s, which also produced several other arena favorites. Among them, House of Pain recorded "Jump Around" and C+C Music Factory produced "Gonna Make You Sweat  (Everybody Dance Now)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Deep within the high-security Iron Mountain storage facility in Hollywood, where nearly every doorway except for the restroom is protected by a security-card swipe lock, sits the Grammy Museum's permanent collection of pop music artifacts, recordings and memorabilia. Hundreds of 10-inch 78 rpm discs - some from Thomas Edison's record label - reside in archival boxes on 20-foot-long metal shelves, near antique radios and phonograph players, musical instruments, posters and some celebrity fashion items stored out of sight in sturdy garment bags.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
There was no mention of Sandy at the Israel Philharmonic's concert in Walt Disney Concert Hall Tuesday night. It wouldn't have hurt to play a little something in solidarity of the millions dealing with the storm's devastation, the Israelis having just appeared at Carnegie Hall last week. Then again, there was something comforting in an uncompromisingly traditional concert at which business was very much as usual. The Israel Philharmonic regularly appears in Los Angeles, where the orchestra has considerable support.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Singer Julie Fowlis is typically used to songs that are a tad older than the ones she sang in Disney/Pixar's  "Brave.  "Her comfort zone is about eight centuries ago. There's plenty of fanciful elements in "Brave"  -- magical wisps, a crafty witch and a mother turned into a bear -- but when it comes to music, the film is grounded in history. Along with composer Patrick Doyle, Fowlis is part of the Scottish contingent working on the film's score, aiming to marry Gaelic traditions with  its symphonic elements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Levon Helm is most widely known for the songs he sang that found their way onto the pop charts during his long tenure as drummer and singer for the Band: "Up On Cripple Creek," "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Don't Do It," earthy and infectious conglomerations of gospel, country, blues, folk and rock music. But the one that might crystallize his approach to music throughout his life was "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show," an ode to the kind of freewheeling gatherings in which the musician, who died of cancer Thursday at 71 in New York, thoroughly reveled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
It was as if the last 80 years of music history had never happened. So conservative were the pieces on the Winners Concert of the Pacific Composers Forum's Competition for New Music that they might have been written that long ago, and even then not caused a stir. Challenging their listeners would not seem to be among these composers' concerns. Pleasantness, accessibility, wistfulness would.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1987 | John Henken \f7
For traditionalists, the Pacific Symphony's Halloween effort includes Mussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain" and Dukas' "Sorcerer's Apprentice," both familiar from the film "Fantasia" and countless seasonal concerts. Children are invited to wear costumes to the performance Saturday morning at Orange County Performing Arts Center. The event is part of the "Mervyn's Musical Mornings" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
It had been a long night ? a concert, a reunion with an old friend, a midnight meal ? but as the clock ticked past 2 a.m. Quincy Jones sat in a rare state of silence in his estate at the very top of Bel-Air. The man they call Q nodded at the cellphone sitting on the kitchen counter. "I've deleted 188 names this year ? all the people who died, all these friends of mine," Jones said. "That's what happens when you're 77, man. That's life, man. You start out playing in bands and doing duets and then you worry that in the end it's all going to be a solo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By David Mermelstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a time when the relationship between African Americans and American Jews seems largely irrelevant to the national conversation, the Idelsohn Society for Musical Preservation is directing its gaze back at a different era. Not the early 1990s, when tensions between the two communities exploded into riots in Brooklyn's Crown Heights, but to the days more than 30 years prior, when blacks and Jews reached across the divide to embrace commonalities....
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