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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
It had been a long night ? a concert, a reunion with an old friend, a midnight meal ? but as the clock ticked past 2 a.m. Quincy Jones sat in a rare state of silence in his estate at the very top of Bel-Air. The man they call Q nodded at the cellphone sitting on the kitchen counter. "I've deleted 188 names this year ? all the people who died, all these friends of mine," Jones said. "That's what happens when you're 77, man. That's life, man. You start out playing in bands and doing duets and then you worry that in the end it's all going to be a solo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
AN EXPANSIVE new work from one of the world's leading choreographers, set to an original score by a high-profile composer making his first foray into the world of dance -- this is hardly American Ballet Theatre's usual fare these days. The multi-part programs that once were the troupe's standard offerings have given way for the most part to full-evening narrative works, especially for touring engagements, as presenters prefer to play things safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
Twenty five years is a sizable slice in the history of any art form. In the case of jazz, it represents one third of the music's recorded history. Since the byline above first appeared regularly in these pages a quarter-century ago, vast changes have taken place on every level. In 1966, the term "fusion" was all but unknown, though the first significant jazz-rock group, Blood, Sweat & Tears, was only two years away.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1990
It is not too surprising to note that Republican politicians are increasingly revealed to have broken their campaign promises! President Bush, Gov. George Deukmejian and perhaps Sen. Pete Wilson too. It would seem that what Pete Wilson really wants most of all is another pension check.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You must remember this, a kiss is still a kiss. . . ." Bryan Ferry sings on "As Time Goes By," his new album of '30s pop standards. At 54, Ferry has been puckering up for a long time now--first as the flamboyant front man for the '70s art-rock pacesetters Roxy Music, later in solo interpretations of some '50s, '60s and '70s songs, and then in his post-Roxy career. But Ferry has never done more than flirt with the golden age classics until now.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorial lies at the heart of the 17th annual Baroque Music Festival of Corona del Mar, which opens Sunday. But that won't mean weeping and sorrow. The festival will premiere a new work to honor Robert Sangster, a prominent Huntington Beach city attorney, music critic and longtime member of the festival board, who died in 1995 after a six-year battle with cancer. The new work, "Cantata Jovialis" by Los Angeles composer Robert Linn, will be performed Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Lobos drummer Louis Perez remembers the time in the mid-'60s when he was growing up in East Los Angeles and his older sister dragged him across Whittier Boulevard to hear a few neighborhood rock bands playing in the parking lot of JohnSons Market. And he remembers a couple of years later taking his bike across the street and sitting on the steps of a Catholic church's social hall to hear bands rehearse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | JIM FRAGALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"My greatest claim to fame," F. Scott Fitzgerald once said, "is that I discovered Bricktop before Cole Porter." In his story "Babylon Revisited," the novelist nostalgically recalled the singer's self-named bistro--the "lost generation's" favorite watering hole, where toute Paris lined up at the door for one of the 14 tiny tables. Ernest Hemingway and Evelyn Waugh also wrote about her; T.S. Eliot referred to her in a poem; and Cole Porter composed a song for her, "Miss Otis Regrets."
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