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OPINION
September 6, 2009 | Greg Kot, Greg Kot is the Chicago Tribune's music critic, co-host of the nationally syndicated public radio show "Sound Opinions" and the author of "Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music."
The invention of the phonograph was going to discourage people from going out to see live music. The introduction of music radio was a surefire way of killing record sales. "Home taping is killing music" screamed the magazine ads when the cassette tape was introduced to the marketplace. Of course, each of those sky-is-falling alerts from the music industry over the last century was a false alarm. With each technological innovation, music became more accessible and more lucrative than ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
The biggest act scheduled to perform this week at the annual South by Southwest music festival is also one of the biggest acts in the world. On March 13, Lady Gaga will take to the outdoor stage behind Stubb's for a concert sponsored by Doritos, which is temporarily renaming the barbecue joint #BoldStage (after its line of flavored tortilla chips) and requiring would-be showgoers to complete one of several so-called bold missions to get inside. Yet Lady Gaga won't be the only A-list artist - nor Doritos the only blue-chip brand - at SXSW, set to run March 11 through March 16 in Austin, Texas.
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BUSINESS
August 29, 2010 | By Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson
The collapse of the old music industry — the happy business of spotting talent, pressing millions of LPs or CDs and wondering how to spend the profits — is so well documented that it is almost a surprise to find a new book on the subject. If you were starting now, you might tell the story by dissecting Guy Hands' disastrous buyout of EMI, studying the Lady Gaga-to-Amy Winehouse hit factory at Universal Music or even revisiting the Japanese-German culture clash that followed the Sony-BMG merger.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2000 | ERIC EASTMAN, Eric Eastman is a senior at Foothill High School in Tustin
I am a frequent user of Napster, which I see as a valuable service. Others, however, see it as a way to steal music. They think of it as circulating music without giving proper compensation to the musicians, producers and record companies. What people who are opposed to this service fail to understand is that Napster really isn't about songs that you hear on the radio all the time or the videos you see on MTV.
OPINION
August 4, 2003
What is euphemistically called trading music online is theft, most of it petty. Songs downloaded free deny artists and record companies their due. Even so, the recording industry has abetted the robbery with its own greed and ineptitude. Though the industry is showing a glimmer that it understands there are better ways to deal with the problem, it also is employing a legal blunderbuss to pursue small-time downloaders as big-time criminals.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Jac Holzman, who founded Elektra Records 60 years ago with $600 — half from his bar mitzvah money — should by all rights be sipping mai tais on a tropical island at this point in his career. Instead, the 79-year-old is exactly where he likes to be: in the thick of a technological tidal wave that's crashed over the very industry he helped to build. Holzman is senior advisor to Edgar Bronfman Jr., the chief executive of Warner Music Group Corp. who asked the veteran to return to the label that bought Elektra in 1970, along with Nonesuch Records, which Holzman launched in 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989
A rock-music industry investigation will be the storyline of a seven-episode arc on CBS' "Wiseguy" beginning March 1. The stories will feature guest stars Tim Curry ("Amadeus," "Rocky Horror Picture Show"), Mick Fleetwood (Fleetwood Mac) and Deidre Hall ("Our House," "Days of Our Lives").
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Roughly a quarter-century ago, Whitney Houston's peers crowned her pop's new princess when they awarded her the Grammy for best female pop vocal performance. At Sunday night's Grammy Awards, many of the same people came together to mourn her untimely death. Barely 24 hours after Houston died in her room at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, as the music world's glitterati massed at the Staples Center, it was evident that Houston's spectral presence would hover fitfully over the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before seeing how "Cosmos" did in the ratings. The Skinny: Man there was a lot of good TV last night. We had the "True Detective" finale, the return of "The Good Wife," the debuts of "Cosmos" and "Resurrection," and, of course, "Girls" and "The Walking Dead. " Alas, my Time Warner Cable DVR didn't record "The Good Wife" so I missed the first 20 minutes. Hope Comcast does better (see below). Today's headlines include the weekend box office recap and a look at the future of music.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Lucian Grainge has a vision for the future of the music business that bears scant resemblance to the traditional record company playbook. He is putting songs on smartphones in Africa, reviving moribund American record labels and making Lorde into a Grammy-winning global sensation. Above all, he wants to forge new partnerships with his industry's erstwhile adversaries - the technology firms that have upended the way people get their music. Skeptics question whether anyone can reverse the decline of an industry that has seen global sales plummet from $28 billion in 1999 to $16.5 billion in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By August Brown
The Grammys are conflicted about electronic dance music, and Beatport sees an opening. In 2012, the Recording Academy nominated dubstep producer Skrillex for new artist, but its Grammy "Tribute to EDM" was a strange melange of DJs performing mash-ups with rap and rock stars. In 2013, the academy was roundly mocked after a dance recording nomination went to Al Walser, a keytar-toting unknown (the Grammys later tweaked rules to prevent such flukes). Dance music legends Daft Punk won album of the year in 2014, but for an album that sounds more like classic disco than today's EDM. Pop Bites: Lea Michele, Robin Thicke and more In contrast, Beatport - the pacesetting EDM download site for DJs and dance-music fans - will announce the winners of its sixth annual Beatport Awards on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Clive Davis typically has many irons in many fires. So even though he's holed up in an elegant Beverly Hills Hotel bungalow he's had at his disposal "forever" - fielding phone calls, e-mails and, yes, even faxes while organizing the annual pre-Grammy Awards bash he's again hosting at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - the veteran producer and record executive makes a point of talking about a project especially close to his heart: a Whitney Houston live album....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
In the last few years, Morrissey  has penned an autobiography and has even briefly alluded to a retirement , but the artist, activist and quite possibly rock 'n' roll's most-adored grouch has more music in his system. Morrissey on Wednesday unveiled his intention to release a new album in 2014, his first since 2009's "Years of Refusal. " Recording for the as-yet-untitled album is slated to begin later this month with noted producer Joseph Chiccarelli, whose accolades include a Grammy for his work with the White Stripes on the act's "Icky Thump.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
A budding folk singer's struggle to connect with fans is at the heart of Joel and Ethan Coen's latest film, "Inside Llewyn Davis," their historically informed story of a musician trying to find his way in the Greenwich Village folk music scene circa 1961. Off the screen, however, Davis has already won some big fans in the music business who are delighted in those rare instances when music and musicians take the center stage on screen. "From our standpoint at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, we love movies like that because they really make people take a look at where the current music they listen to comes from," said Rock Hall of Fame Foundation President Joel Peresman.
OPINION
September 7, 2003
Re "Top Label Cuts CD Prices to Fight Net Downloads," Sept. 4: Some years ago I stopped buying classical CDs because of the high cost for a product that actually costs about $3 to put on the shelf. Also, some $17 to $18 issues were 20-year-old recordings in analog. So, consumers pay high prices for digital CDs that offer only analog sound. Ridiculous! No wonder sales have slipped. I don't download classical music from the Internet. I just stopped downloading too much cash from my pockets to the greedy record companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Yet another show business awards program has been scheduled with the first "Thanksgiving Awards of the Music Industry." The Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons with Brain Injury--which sponsors the annual "Singers Salute the Songwriter" concerts--will be honored at the Thanksgiving Awards when Clooney is given the first "Wind Beneath Our Wings" award. Dolores Hope, wife of comedian Bob Hope, and Edie Wasserman, wife of MCA honcho Lew Wasserman, are honorary chairwomen for the event.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The gig: Bill Gerber is a film producer whose credits include "Gran Torino," "The Dukes of Hazzard," and "The In-Laws. " His next movie, "Grudge Match," which will be released by Warner Bros. on Christmas Day, stars Robert De Niro and Sylvester Stallone as old boxing rivals who come out of retirement for one final fight. Rock 'n' roll dreams: Gerber, 56, grew up wanting to be a rock 'n' roll drummer. "The minute I heard [the Beatles'] 'I Saw Her Standing There,' the world changed," he said.
OPINION
November 19, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Trying to decode rap lyrics, as rich as they often are in regional slang and obscure references, can be like watching a foreign-language movie without subtitles. For instance, on "A Queens Story," what does Nas mean when he raps, "You be starving in Kew Gardens/Bolognas and milk from a small carton"? That's where the Rap Genius website comes in. Users of the site not only have transcribed and uploaded thousands of raps, they annotated them with explanations. For instance, three Rap Genius contributors explained that Kew Gardens is the site of the Queens Criminal Court, and bologna sandwiches with a carton of milk is a typical meal served in jail.
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