Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMusic Industry Finances
IN THE NEWS

Music Industry Finances

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite surprising sales dives by the new Prince and Madonna albums, record retailers across the nation voiced optimism Wednesday that the holiday sales season may help salvage what has been a flat year in pop. The reason for the rosy outlook: a feeling among retailers that there is a renewed sense of consumer confidence after the presidential election. "People seem to be in a more upbeat mood about the economy than they were before Nov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sales continued to flag, Garth Brooks announced his retirement and the Nashville Network removed "Nashville" from its name during 2000, a desultory year for the country music industry. Platinum sales for the Dixie Chicks and Faith Hill were hopeful signs for Nashville, which has seen its market share drop steadily for five years after explosive growth in the early 1990s.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been widely predicted that rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut album next month will explode onto the national pop charts at No. 1--selling as much as 300,000 copies in its first week. But that was before the rapper was charged with murder by Los Angeles police on Tuesday. Snoop did not pull the trigger but was allegedly driving the Jeep the shots were fired from. So will the negative publicity of a murder charge derail the album's likelihood of storming the charts?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Maybe it's time to think of LeAnn Rimes as the giant killer in pop music. As unlikely as it may seem given all the hoopla surrounding the Rolling Stones and U2 stadium tours, the 15-year-old country music sensation apparently generated more pop dollars in North America during 1997 than U2, and almost more than the Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Maybe it's time to think of LeAnn Rimes as the giant killer in pop music. As unlikely as it may seem given all the hoopla surrounding the Rolling Stones and U2 stadium tours, the 15-year-old country music sensation apparently generated more pop dollars in North America during 1997 than U2, and almost more than the Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it seems that U2 is "Pop"-ing up all over the place these days, that's good news to Island Records. Along with the Irish rock group's management team, the record company has been working behind the scenes for months trying to guarantee maximum media exposure in anticipation of the release next Tuesday of the band's new album, "Pop."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sales continued to flag, Garth Brooks announced his retirement and the Nashville Network removed "Nashville" from its name during 2000, a desultory year for the country music industry. Platinum sales for the Dixie Chicks and Faith Hill were hopeful signs for Nashville, which has seen its market share drop steadily for five years after explosive growth in the early 1990s.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death Row Records dominated the nation's pop chart this week with Tupac Shakur's posthumous album, and based on sales projections of its fourth-quarter release schedule, the company stands poised to rule the rap market during the lucrative Christmas rush. But even as the company generates millions of dollars in revenue and is regarded as the most successful rap label in the country, Death Row's future is in jeopardy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Concert promoters around the country are singing the summertime blues--again. Once considered recession-proof, the concert industry has had a tough time making ends meet since 1991 when it suffered its own economic downturn on the heels of the nation's. Arena revenues plunged from $1.2 billion in 1990 to $830 million in 1991. While grosses rebounded slightly last year, promoters complained Wednesday that they do not expect the situation to improve any this summer--especially in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it seems that U2 is "Pop"-ing up all over the place these days, that's good news to Island Records. Along with the Irish rock group's management team, the record company has been working behind the scenes for months trying to guarantee maximum media exposure in anticipation of the release next Tuesday of the band's new album, "Pop."
BUSINESS
November 14, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death Row Records dominated the nation's pop chart this week with Tupac Shakur's posthumous album, and based on sales projections of its fourth-quarter release schedule, the company stands poised to rule the rap market during the lucrative Christmas rush. But even as the company generates millions of dollars in revenue and is regarded as the most successful rap label in the country, Death Row's future is in jeopardy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been widely predicted that rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut album next month will explode onto the national pop charts at No. 1--selling as much as 300,000 copies in its first week. But that was before the rapper was charged with murder by Los Angeles police on Tuesday. Snoop did not pull the trigger but was allegedly driving the Jeep the shots were fired from. So will the negative publicity of a murder charge derail the album's likelihood of storming the charts?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Concert promoters around the country are singing the summertime blues--again. Once considered recession-proof, the concert industry has had a tough time making ends meet since 1991 when it suffered its own economic downturn on the heels of the nation's. Arena revenues plunged from $1.2 billion in 1990 to $830 million in 1991. While grosses rebounded slightly last year, promoters complained Wednesday that they do not expect the situation to improve any this summer--especially in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite surprising sales dives by the new Prince and Madonna albums, record retailers across the nation voiced optimism Wednesday that the holiday sales season may help salvage what has been a flat year in pop. The reason for the rosy outlook: a feeling among retailers that there is a renewed sense of consumer confidence after the presidential election. "People seem to be in a more upbeat mood about the economy than they were before Nov.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|