Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMusic Industry Hispanics
IN THE NEWS

Music Industry Hispanics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY
We are left here with two extremes: La Ley and Cafe Tacuba. The former is the nice boy group; the latter, the bad boys. La Ley is conventional and clean in its sound, compositions and arrangements; Cafe Tacuba is the revolutionaries, eclectic, very sui generis, the enemies of the musical stereotype. In music, barriers must continue to be broken. And the band that has shown the most creativity and bravery in rock (at least in the language of Cervantes) is Cafe Tacuba. That's why it's my choice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Organizers of the new Latin Grammy Awards said Thursday that criticism of their event by Fonovisa, the nation's largest independent Latin label, is unfair. Fonovisa's general manager, Gilberto Moreno, earlier this week said Fonovisa would not support the Sept. 13 Latin Grammys ceremony in Los Angeles because he feels the event does not adequately represent Mexican regional artists and that it favors Miami-based producer and music mogul Emilio Estefan and the Sony Music labels.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY
We are left here with two extremes: La Ley and Cafe Tacuba. The former is the nice boy group; the latter, the bad boys. La Ley is conventional and clean in its sound, compositions and arrangements; Cafe Tacuba is the revolutionaries, eclectic, very sui generis, the enemies of the musical stereotype. In music, barriers must continue to be broken. And the band that has shown the most creativity and bravery in rock (at least in the language of Cervantes) is Cafe Tacuba. That's why it's my choice.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY, LA OPINION
Names such as Ricky Martin, Marc Anthony and Enrique Iglesias have become familiar in the mainstream U.S. market; but, in the coming months, they may have to make room for Shakira, who is recording her first English-language album and who is being called the next revelation from the Spanish-speaking world. The 23-year-old Colombian singer is a Latina version of Alanis Morissette.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living in Los Angeles, it might be easy to think that most Latinos are brown-skinned and of Mexican descent; after all, about 80% of the city's Latino population identifies as Mexican. Listening to Spanish radio in Los Angeles, it might seem that Latin music means only ranchera, banda and mariachi, or, most recently, the pop stylings of Ricky Martin and Enrique Iglesias.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a huge meteor were to plummet onto Miami Beach today, the Americas would instantly become a much quieter, sadder place. That's because thousands of the most influential people in the music business from North America, Central America and South America have descended upon this trendy town for a week of networking, performing, partying and general hustling known as MIDEM Americas.
NEWS
September 12, 2000
Ni es lo mismo ni es igual: JUAN LUIS GUERRA Like Colombia's Carlos Vives, Guerra has skillfully fused the rhythms of his native land--in this case, the Dominican Republic--with the inescapable influence of Anglo pop idioms. Guerra grew up listening to the Beatles and Pink Floyd, but the influence of the sticky merengue and bachata beats is ever present in his music.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY, LA OPINION
Names such as Ricky Martin, Marc Anthony and Enrique Iglesias have become familiar in the mainstream U.S. market; but, in the coming months, they may have to make room for Shakira, who is recording her first English-language album and who is being called the next revelation from the Spanish-speaking world. The 23-year-old Colombian singer is a Latina version of Alanis Morissette.
NEWS
September 12, 2000
Ni es lo mismo ni es igual: JUAN LUIS GUERRA Like Colombia's Carlos Vives, Guerra has skillfully fused the rhythms of his native land--in this case, the Dominican Republic--with the inescapable influence of Anglo pop idioms. Guerra grew up listening to the Beatles and Pink Floyd, but the influence of the sticky merengue and bachata beats is ever present in his music.
NEWS
September 12, 2000
A joint publication of The Los Angeles Times and La Opinion Editors: Oscar Garza (Los Angeles Times) Marcelo Rey (La Opinion) Writers: Ernesto Lechner Marcelo Rey Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez Art Directors: Reuben Munoz Chuck Nigash Photo Editor: Cindy Hively News Editor: Tom Bronzini Copy Editors: Loree Matsui Wil Ramirez Scott Sandell John Scheibe Cicely Wedgeworth Cover Illustration: Reuben Munoz To hear audio clips of the Latin Grammys' top nominees, and to see the complete bilingual section
NEWS
September 12, 2000
Dimelo (I Need to Know): MARC ANTHONY Anthony's crossover success is the story of a young salsero who funkified his clave and thus became a mainstream sensation. On hit salsa albums the Nuyorican singer had already demonstrated how he could incorporate R&B elements into his urban-friendly tropical style. When it came time to record an English-language pop album (which includes the nominated Spanish version of this song), the timbales and congas were brought along.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|