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NEWS
September 12, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Wednesday, the first Latin Grammy Awards show will be held at Staples Center and broadcast live on CBS. So, what, exactly, is a Latin Grammy? And how--or why--is it separate from a regular Grammy? Here's the short answer: A Latin Grammy is an award honoring musical excellence by artists who perform in Spanish or Portuguese. What's that, you say? You thought the regular Grammys already did that?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2000
General Categories Record of the Year: "Corazon Espinado," Santana featuring Mana (Fher Olvera and KC Porter, producers; Benny Faccone, engineer/mixer). Album of the Year "Amarte Es Un Placer," Luis Miguel (Luis Miguel, producer; Rafa Sardina and Al Schmitt, engineers/mixers). Song of the Year: "Dimelo" ("I Need to Know"), Marc Anthony, Robert Blades, Angie Chirino and Cory Rooney (Marc Anthony, artist). Best New Artist: Ibrahim Ferrer. Pop Female Vocal: "Ojos Asi," Shakira.
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NEWS
September 12, 2000
General Categories * Record of the year / Grabacion del ano: "Dimelo (I Need to Know)," Marc Anthony (Cory Rooney, producer; Tony Maserati & Robb Williams, engineers/mixers); "Tiempos," Ruben Blades (Ruben Blades, Walter Flores, Edin Solis and Carlos Vargas, producers; Roberto Delgado, Oscar Marin and Alexander Orozco, engineers/mixers); "Livin' La Vida Loca," Ricky Martin (Desmond Child and Robi Rosa, producers; Charles Dye, engineer/mixer); "Corazon Espinado," Santana featuring Mana (Fher
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY
We are left here with two extremes: La Ley and Cafe Tacuba. The former is the nice boy group; the latter, the bad boys. La Ley is conventional and clean in its sound, compositions and arrangements; Cafe Tacuba is the revolutionaries, eclectic, very sui generis, the enemies of the musical stereotype. In music, barriers must continue to be broken. And the band that has shown the most creativity and bravery in rock (at least in the language of Cervantes) is Cafe Tacuba. That's why it's my choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2000 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Organizers of the new Latin Grammy Awards said Thursday that criticism of their event by Fonovisa, the nation's largest independent Latin label, is unfair. Fonovisa's general manager, Gilberto Moreno, earlier this week said Fonovisa would not support the Sept. 13 Latin Grammys ceremony in Los Angeles because he feels the event does not adequately represent Mexican regional artists and that it favors Miami-based producer and music mogul Emilio Estefan and the Sony Music labels.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY, LA OPINION
Names such as Ricky Martin, Marc Anthony and Enrique Iglesias have become familiar in the mainstream U.S. market; but, in the coming months, they may have to make room for Shakira, who is recording her first English-language album and who is being called the next revelation from the Spanish-speaking world. The 23-year-old Colombian singer is a Latina version of Alanis Morissette.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, C. Michael Greene has built a mighty power base as head of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, the not-for-profit group that stages the annual Grammy Awards show. The once-struggling musician drives a Mercedes-Benz, enjoys a membership at the Bel-Air Country Club and makes $1.3 million a year--all at the expense of the academy and its charitable arms.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Living in Los Angeles, it might be easy to think that most Latinos are brown-skinned and of Mexican descent; after all, about 80% of the city's Latino population identifies as Mexican. Listening to Spanish radio in Los Angeles, it might seem that Latin music means only ranchera, banda and mariachi, or, most recently, the pop stylings of Ricky Martin and Enrique Iglesias.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY
We are left here with two extremes: La Ley and Cafe Tacuba. The former is the nice boy group; the latter, the bad boys. La Ley is conventional and clean in its sound, compositions and arrangements; Cafe Tacuba is the revolutionaries, eclectic, very sui generis, the enemies of the musical stereotype. In music, barriers must continue to be broken. And the band that has shown the most creativity and bravery in rock (at least in the language of Cervantes) is Cafe Tacuba. That's why it's my choice.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARCELO REY, LA OPINION
Names such as Ricky Martin, Marc Anthony and Enrique Iglesias have become familiar in the mainstream U.S. market; but, in the coming months, they may have to make room for Shakira, who is recording her first English-language album and who is being called the next revelation from the Spanish-speaking world. The 23-year-old Colombian singer is a Latina version of Alanis Morissette.
NEWS
September 12, 2000
Cafe Quijano Listening to the old-fashioned bolero "Falsas Promesas" on the debut album of this Spanish group--the manly vocal delivery, sweeping orchestral arrangement and measured percussion--will make you think you're listening to a vintage recording from the '50s. And yet "La Extraordinaria Paradoja del Sonido Quijano" (The Extraordinary Paradox of the Quijano Sound) was recorded in Madrid in early 1999.
NEWS
September 12, 2000
Al lado del camino: FITO PAEZ This Argentine rocker has always showcased a knack for impressionism, filling his songs with vivid images of life in the Third World. This time, he has outdone himself with a torrent of metaphors and musings that reveal the soul of a restless poet inside the body of a famous singer.
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