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BUSINESS
March 25, 1987 | JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writer
Trade legislation affecting new music technology that some say may produce "perfect sound" faces its first congressional hurdle today as a House panel is expected to vote on whether to restrict the sale of digital audio tape recorders. The technology, also known as DAT, is the focus of a long-simmering dispute between Japanese audio equipment manufacturers and the U.S. music industry.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With federal lawmakers divided over how to police entertainment, a new report issued Tuesday forced record executives to defend their failure to revise marketing practices as promised. The report by the Federal Trade Commission, which gives the movie and video game industries faint praise, refocuses attention on an issue that had lost steam on Capitol Hill after last fall's highly publicized hearings.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For those who want to get their music sooner, easier and perhaps even cheaper, this may be your year. After running scared from the Internet for several years, the music industry is now rushing headlong into the technology-driven future. Time Warner Inc.'s back-to-back deals with America Online Inc. and music giant EMI Group--an accord expected to be announced today--signal the rising conviction in the music industry that its future hinges on a medium that so far has mainly threatened it.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark accord that should open the floodgates to a wave of new music-recording technologies, electronics manufacturers have agreed to pay royalties to the music industry on the sale of all digital home-recording equipment. The agreement, which will be formally announced today and requires congressional approval, will end a battle that began four years ago with the advent of digital audiotape (DAT) technology.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wherehouse Entertainment's name is hardly music to the ears of major music company executives this week. The Torrance chain of 339 music and video stores has become the talk of the music industry for engaging four powerful record conglomerates in an unprecedented legal fight over its right to buy and sell used compact discs. Retailers and music companies often have their differences, but rarely does this level of ill will surface publicly.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1994 | JAMES BATES and CHUCK PHILIPS
Among the rules established in 1994 in the music industry: The Eagles can still sell a lot of records and concert seats, monks with good voices can break into the Top 10, and it's important to differentiate whether rap refers to rap music or a rap sheet. Mostly, 1994 in music was the year of executive suite turmoil, played out publicly for weeks. Although things have calmed down at Time Warner's music group for now, there remain some hot spots to watch in 1995.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Royalties that digital music companies, including Apple Inc. and record labels, pay songwriters for selling their music as ring tones, CDs and permanent digital downloads are to be set today by a federal agency. This is the first time in nearly three decades that the industry has been unable to decide the fee for sales of recorded music on its own. Apple has so strongly opposed increasing the rate, now 9.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2004 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
They have been compared to the Rolling Stones for their longevity and legions of loyal fans. They've sold tens of millions of albums in Latin America. Now the seminal Mexican rock group El Tri is getting dumped by its record label. The reason: Bootleggers are the only ones profiting. Piracy is so rife in Mexico that the vast majority of the band's album sales are illegal CDs peddled on the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Being a jazz singer these days isn't easy, even for one as celebrated in her craft as is Rebecca Parris. Her infrequent recordings, notably the 1993 "Spring" from MusicMasters Jazz and her 1994 collaboration with vibraphonist Gary Burton for GRP, "It's Another Day," have received rave reviews. She has been championed by such established jazz stars as Burton and singing great Shirley Horn.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and federal lawmakers are planning to launch hearings into music industry business practices after a series of high-profile lawsuits and newfound activism among recording artists. Sharp criticism of industry customs is resonating in Washington and Sacramento, where officials are preparing to examine what rock stars such as Courtney Love and Don Henley are calling the "unconscionable" contracts and accounting practices of the Big Five music conglomerates.
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