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NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Friday afternoon, while South by Southwest festival attendees were sleeping off hangovers or busy making new ones, in a conference room at the Austin Convention Center, record people were discussing the return of indie record stores, the success of the annual Record Store Day and their vision for the future of brick and mortar music shopping. The panel was dubbed "Record Stores Are Dead. Long Live Record Stores. " It's not the most earth-shattering story coming out of Austin, Texas, but it is a curious one, considering that in 2014, technology start-ups and snack chip sponsorships rule the conversation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Barbara Isenberg
CHICAGO - When London-born Anna Clyne was 7, friends of her parents gave her family a piano with randomly missing keys. Undeterred, Clyne not only played that piano but by age 11 had written a few little songs for herself and a flute-playing friend. She had fun doing it, she remembers, but "I never thought I would become a composer. " These days, there is no longer any doubt on her part or anyone else's. Her idiosyncratic music has been performed not only at Symphony Center in Chicago but also in Los Angeles' Walt Disney Concert Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall and London's Barbican Centre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Concert season kickoff in Los Angeles this year boasts a few rare sightings, the most notable of which is New York singer and pianist Billy Joel, who arrives for the first concert of his classics here in years. Joel's been doing these sorts of shows as part of a monthly residency at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, so by the time he arrives at the Hollywood Bowl May 17 for the first of three nights the rust should be mostly knocked from his joints. Another curio, a French chanteuse and former first lady of France, Carla Bruni, will arrive in Los Angeles in the capacity for which she first gained renown: as a vocalist updating the classic French pop sound (that and as a supermodel)
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Kari Howard
I'm one of those music fans who never really gave their hearts to CDs. Sure, I bought a million of them, but their chilly perfection always left me cold, and I quietly mourned the warmth of vinyl. So it was particularly satisfying that when MP3s came along, not only did CDs fall by the wayside, but a new generation of listeners got turned on to vinyl. Of course, I had never given up my turntable, but it got a little less lonely in the album fan club. Then I saw something that's been making waves at SXSW this week: a wayback machine that turns MP3s into vinyl.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By David Ng
The late-career comeback of Sylvester Stallone took a detour to Broadway this week with the opening of his "Rocky" at the Winter Garden Theatre. The new show, which Stallone co-wrote and produced (but doesn't star in), is a musical version of his 1976 movie about a Philadelphia boxer who dreams of big victory. Stallone took a bow on Thursday when "Rocky" officially opened in New York following a month of preview performances. The actor has been working on the musical for a number of years, first unveiling the show in Hamburg, Germany in 2012.  The musical -- which comes with a reported price tag of $16.5 million, steep by Broadway standards -- features music by Stephen Flaherty, who has reworked some of the movie music originally scored by Bill Conti.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt
Controversy of one kind or another has dogged "Porgy and Bess" since its Broadway premiere in 1935. Just the fact that George Gershwin's first real stab at grand opera debuted on Broadway rather than the Metropolitan Opera, which had initially commissioned the work, encapsulates two of the work's main fault lines: the debate over whether it's a musical or an opera or something in between, and the matter of its African American cast, which necessitated...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By James Rainey
At just 21, a kid from the San Fernando Valley named Jim Berk began work as a music teacher at Carson High School. Within a couple of years, the teacher, not much older than some of his students, had turned a woebegone marching band into one of the best in Southern California. Then Berk moved to struggling Hamilton High School to launch a music magnet program. It gained national acclaim and so many new students that officials reversed their threat to close the Westside campus. "The Wunderkind of education" the Times dubbed him in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By August Brown
“If I forgot anybody, sorry, I just smoked before I came out here,” Lil Wayne said to guffaws from the overflowing room at the Austin Convention Center during the 2014 South by Southwest festival. “Shoutout to Willie Nelson.” Game recognizes game.  Wayne was tasked with rattling off all the artists currently on his label Young Money, and it sounded like he got them all. The list was an implicit torch-passing: Wayne has announced that his next album “Tha Carter 5” might be his last.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Wednesday's incident at the South by Southwest Music Conference in Austin, Texas,  in which two people were killed and nearly two dozen others injured by a suspected drunk driver who police say drove into a crowd outside a club while trying to evade officers, was just the latest tragedy to hit during a heavily populated music event. Here are a dozen others, from Pukkelpop to Altamont. 2012: Radiohead, Toronto: A drum technician was killed when a stage roof collapsed in fair weather before the English band was scheduled to perform.
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